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So I get the salmon trout mag. from the UK and they had an article about sea trout in wales in there..

They showed a pic of the flies and the "singles" looked a helluva lot like awesome salmon flies...Is there any difference and does anyone know what they are or use?
 

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''Speydo-masochist''
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Here in celtic West of the UK most of the sea trout fly fishing is a nocturnal sport, consequently the size of flies can be quite large with Tubes, Waddingtons, large surface lures & dressed single hook flies all being used.

Day time fishing needs a really careful approach [they are much more easily spooked than salmon] & often tiny flies like wee size 14 - 20 doubles or micro-tubes all being popular for clear water conditions.

I guess you are looking at the night time flies, the popular starting point is probably a silver stoat tied slim on a size 8 [for early on on a floater] going up to a 1.5" tube or a size 2 single [or both if you fish a dropper] from a sink tip/ intermediate or full sinker depending on the depth & flow in the pool/ run in question. [early season cold nights can see 3" tubes & big tandem singles being deployed].

Then the variations start! add a bit of red, or blue, or yellow - or any comination of these or any other colours to suit that river in those conditions.

Now some flash material, jungle cock, fluorescent threads, luminous materials etc etc, or other traditional patterns like the Haslem - which is still very popular on the Dovey & neighbouring rivers.

Basically the variations are almost infinate, but a slim silver stoats tail is a pretty good place to start.

Regards, Tyke.
 

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''Speydo-masochist''
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Just back in from 3 hrs night fishing on the Towy; one half hearted pull was all.

None of the various patterns worked, although the otter was interested & came within 5 feet of me whilst I was wading.

Damn sea trout, I'm going to try a hand grenade if this goes on........

Better get to bed now, I may manage about 5 hrs before the alarm goes off.

Regards, Tyke.
 

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I wouldn't be too religious about the spooking effect. Remember that sea trouts are regularly taken by relatively large fishing lures - The same goes with the atlantic salmon ... at least here in Denmark. So there is no way that you will be able to spook a trout with even a monster sized fly unless you involve bombarda floaters and that doesn't count as fly fishing.

What will have an impact is the choice of fly regarding which food items are swarming/prevalent, whether or not the water is clear or cloudy, which time of day you are fishing, and where you choose to fish and how you strip your fly.

Before starting to whip the water, take a look into the water. What moves around? Do you see swarms of mysis, shrimp, stickleback, tobis, nereids? Choose a fly that mimics the food items which are the most prevalent.

If the water is cloudy you want to pimp up on UV, flash or peacock ... if the water is clear you want to downsize the fly and go ultra realistic.

At day see above for good advise, for dawn or evening, or summer night, choose larger denser and darker flies, which make a visible outline when seen from below. Black flies with a hint of blue, preferably with some good UV.

Fish over "leopard bottom" which is the bottom with strands of seaweed, pools and rocks. Sandy bottom is a waste of time, unless you fish for flounders ;-)

Imitate the movement of the food item you try to mimic and vary the way you strip the fly. Remember to make good pauses in the stripping. Attacks will often come after you let the fly rest on the bottom after a frantic stripping ;-)

And remember to enjoy the bycatches. I had my boss out fly fishing in the fjord for the first time in knee deep water. He was pretty sceptic when we started, nonregarding that many many sea trouts had been landed at this exact spot. After a while he got pretty exalted by experience of frantic garfishes and the shock waves produced by the attacking garfishes, and proclaimed that this was in many way similar to flyfishing for bonefish on the flats ;-) Still no sea trouts but one heck of a day ;-)



Knæk og bræk
Søren
 

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i was in Denmark last month and caught a sea trout (while targeting salmon)
not sure if these are Seatrout flies... but they worked

This was my morning fly


and on a tube
this is the one that got the eat


 

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You're fishing rivers - a whole other kind of ball game ;-) When the trout start to wander up the rivers, the hunger subsides and your approach will be to provoke not to entice ;-)

Søren
 

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Do you guys have any tips for fishing them in rivers? In your experience, how is different from salmon fishing? We have some very small runs of sea trout in the eastern US. I don't know where to find them in the sea (they would quickly become food for striped bass and bluefish). We find them in rivers in different seasons. Any tips for targeting them would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
 

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In Denmark they are in the big rivers, in the estuaries, in the fjords and in the sea. On low mottled bottom in fjords and beaches you find the small adults, and if you go trolling from a boat you can catch real monsters ;-) In my humble opinion then fishing wise I don't think you will find river going sea trouts much different from salmon. After all sea trout is closer related to atlantic salmon, than your steelheads and chinooks etc. ...
 
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