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Skagit heads are shorter for a given grainage, which means they are thicker, too.

The extra weight (and a less tapered front end) allows them to turn over heavy-ish sink tips with ease.

Scandi's tend to be a bit longer for a given weight, with a front end tapering to a finer tip. They are intended for light-ish polyleaders, sometimes sinking but generally floating (or you can just use a mono leader for floating work).

For most of us, Skagits are for winter work and Scandi's for summer use.

I use the very same casts for either: doubles, snaps of various types, pokes, etc--Right shoulder or cackhanded.

For a given rod, "sweet spot" scandi's tend to be 50 grains (give or take 50 grains, or so) lighter than skagits.

Your mileage may vary.

Keith
 

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Scandi's tend to be a bit longer for a given weight, with a front end tapering to a finer tip. They are intended for light-ish polyleaders, sometimes sinking but generally floating (or you can just use a mono leader for floating work).


Not exactly. The are an excellent sinking heads on the market, like triple density Guidleine, which have triangle taper, the head travels in the water column under higher angle then a dual density lines and unlike Sagit set-up where thick floating belly act as bobber for sink tip ( T-11, T-14), 3D line ( e.g: Floater-Hoever-Inermediate or Int-S2-S4) enters the water column closer to an angler. In case of faster sink rate lines, most of the line drops quickly under water surface, what substantially reduces a speed of the line ( a surface water travels much faster the mid or bottom sections) and eliminates the need for unnecessary mending.

In case of heads like F-I-S2, I-S2-S4, one can of course use a short polyleader, however considering rather fine front taper, 3-7' leader/tippet can be used, specially for oversized flies. Also, oi case of higher wt. heads, 9/10 or higher , the front 8 feet of the head weights ca. 8-9 gr/foot what enables to case pretty large size flies in needed.

Since the rear part of the head is floats higher then mid or front sections, 3D line are quite easy to lift and can be fish longer then traditional dual density lines.

For example GL 3D wt. 9/10 cut from the back to ca. 37' weights 470-485 gr depending on the sink rate.

In low water conditions when fishing top 6-12" of the water column, F-H-I is absolutely brilliant, fishes great, cuts throughout wind beautifully and cast a tight loops.
 

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Timely post for me as well

I'm still trying to sort out when I'll use a Scandi. I have a couple, but as I been learning and practicing, I've found that using a mid-belly line is to my liking. I'm able to make pretty decent single spey casts with it and with that said, why would I want to use a Scandi versus the mid-belly line?
 

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With mid-belly line, depending on the rod length, you need to have 55-65' of belly out of the tip. What about if you want to cast closer? Can you do the same cast so well with part of the belly inside the guides.

With Scandi and shooting line there is plenty of versatility. When using underhand cast one can execute short or long cast with much less effort. There is no need for a lot of back cast room too.
 

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With mid-belly line, depending on the rod length, you need to have 55-65' of belly out of the tip. What about if you want to cast closer? Can you do the same cast so well with part of the belly inside the guides.
Yes you can. When casting rod bends more when there is heavy belly inside guides and on forward stop rod tip "overshoots" as well which opens line loop slightly but when you don't shoot any line the line loop straightens very well.

When line is shot when some belly is inside guides line loop widens. Not pretty but casting is light anyway.

Esa
 

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Thanks for the info

Sazan, good points. If I'm on water that will require a mixture of distances, the Scandi may be more convenient.

I also think that shorter casts are doable with the mid-belly line, I'll just need to be more conscious of the distance and the length of the line I have out.
 

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Bender,

I did not say you can't, but is not so pretty. In such cased Scandi heads form floater to fast sinking are more effective and easier to play with.

When there is plenty of room to form D-Loop with full head out f the tip and longer cast are needed, mid-belly lines are great.
 

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Practice helps

Understatement I know, but this afternoon I worked on short casts with a mid-belly line and as noted, it isn't pretty, but it works. I needed to pay more attention to timing to be consistent. But, in fairness, the scandis did work well also. A short cast on a steelhead river may be a long cast on a trout stream. It seems good to have as many tricks in your basket as you can.
 

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In regards to scandi, skagit or mid belly lines, which would be best for a 11' switch rod that may be used for occasional nymping. ive been looking at a scandi short but didnt know if the floating tip would allow for dead drifting nymphs.

hope i didnt post this question in the wrong spot.

thanks
 

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Scandi or Skagit?

I am a Skagit fan, in fact, I would be interested in a 35' Skagit head. I fish the Deschutes quite a bit. I was convinced a while back to get a Scandi head for my 12.5 foot spey rod. I did and it casts beautifully - until the wind comes up. On the Deschutes that means gusts to 25-30 mph. That Scandi head went about halfway out, the nice tapered front section looked like a suspended snake, landing upstream from the body so far that it was almost impossible to mend and get a drift. In those same circumstances, a Skagit would be much, much better. The heavy body pierces the wind and the tip can't go too far wrong. So, next weekend I'll go back to my Skagit and cheater rig. It may not land like a feather, but it won't get blown to the next county either. All I am saying is that if you fish the surface in a gale, a clunky ol' Skagit is the better choice. If its calm, a Scandi would be the better choice. And of course, Skagits are much better for dredging.
 
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