Spey Pages banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just put my last day in on the Sandy here in Oregon. Tough one for me. 15 days on the water and 1 grab. Wondering how others fared this winter? If you fish the Sandy at all I'd love to know how your season went.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,310 Posts
What?! You aren't springer fishing?!

Not many people that I know who fish the Sandy had much luck this year with steelhead. It seemed there weren't big pushes if fish. In stead, they just sort of trickled in. The Clackamas fished a little better, but you know the ins and outs of fishing that water. The steelhead fishing seemed to pick up late. Hopefully springers won't disappoint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Along those lines, has anyone put up some 2017 projections for the Columbia steelhead runs? A bit worried the three year run of below average NW precip may have us in the toilet for a couple more season.:confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
I fished hard the oxbow area for four days straight end of last month. Camped, fished all day long. One bump.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Damn... depressing news indeed. Last summer on the JD and Deschutes were scary. Most everyone I respect on the Deschutes seems to be optimistic of higher future returns and that 2016 was an anomaly. I consider myself pretty educated on the happenings of local river conservation in regards to wild steelhead and there seems to be absolutely no definitive answers everyone can agree on as to the long-term health of these river systems. Can it all be weather, hatchery genes, and over harvest on free flowing rivers?

Also, with all this precipitation and snow pack this winter and last, shouldn't that improve steelhead returns over the next few seasons?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,304 Posts
Damn... depressing news indeed. Last summer on the JD and Deschutes were scary. Most everyone I respect on the Deschutes seems to be optimistic of higher future returns and that 2016 was an anomaly. I consider myself pretty educated on the happenings of local river conservation in regards to wild steelhead and there seems to be absolutely no definitive answers everyone can agree on as to the long-term health of these river systems. Can it all be weather, hatchery genes, and over harvest on free flowing rivers?

Also, with all this precipitation and snow pack this winter and last, shouldn't that improve steelhead returns over the next few seasons?
One and two salt fish will be the returns from these bleak years. Few spawners, fewer returns.
 

·
Undertaker
Joined
·
1,363 Posts
salmon return projections

:surprise:please allow me to explain a few things before you go to the link below. First, the projections from spring Chinook returns to the Columbia River basin (Bonneville Dam) for 2017 and 18 are in the toilet. Ditto coho and fall Chinook. But you should know that these projections are based mostly (exclusively?) from correlations developed between ocean conditions during the juvenile ocean entry year (smolts) and the abundance of adult returns. NMFS has developed fairly strong correlations - but there have been outliers (years with more fish than expected, given the conditions). Sorry, they don't have a correlation for steelhead, but I think it is safe to say, they will also be in the toilet. If you scroll down, past the traffic-light dots you will find the depressing graphs - the predicted run sizes for 2017 and 2018 are shown by arrows on the graph. Over on the left you will see links to a plethora of data and analyses. The reason this year and next year are expected to be terrible years for salmon is that ocean conditions have been poor to terrible for salmon from 2014 through 2016. Two interrelated issues - the northeastern Pacific was much warmer than usual and there was an enormous algal bloom in the nearshore environment (largescale algal blooms can cause very low dissolved oxygen at night, suffocating all animals in the affected area and this algal species creates a toxin). On a more positive note, the persistent high pressure ridge and resulting calm, warm ocean are gone now and the biomass of larval fishes observed in recent plankton tows were huge. While the low diversity of ichthyoplankton is a counter-indicator, generally conditions this year look good for outmigrants, so expect a rebound in fish numbers - as early as 2018 for steelhead.

https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/research/divisions/fe/estuarine/oeip/g-forecast.cfm#TableSF-02
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
93 Posts
Bristerspielman: with the benefit of a great guide (Travis Johnson) and
lucky timing for a nice push of water, I went 2 for 2 in as many days this
season. This thread makes me realize how very fortunate I was to have
gotten a few grabs.

Got a nice pic of Berry's Rambulance and a very near miss on the hook set;-)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Sandy was tough all the way, poor numbers and less than ideal water conditions. The fish seemed to be very much podded up so when you found one, you might have found more. Yes, very frustrating season, but some days of glory. Gear guys struggled as well. Travis, Marty, Brian as guides upped your chances. I would say having hooked 3-5 fish was a god season for most people fishing a couple days a month.

It's not you😃

DH
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top