Spey Pages banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm gearing up for my first year steelheading on New York's Salmon River and I have a couple questions about fly selection. In the spey courses I took there was lots of talk about how great tube flies are, and that is something I'm absolutely looking into.

However, I'm curious if I can still use some of the more traditional patterns on a spey such as egg patterns, buggers, egg sucking leaches, and other nymph patterns? Or do I need to stick with more "speyfly" patterns?

Finally, I'm planning on using a simple 12lb floro setup for tippet. I assume it will still work fine to use this with egg patterns and buggers?

Thanks guys!
 

·
Swarner's Flies
Joined
·
1,400 Posts
You can use them (eggs, nymphs) on a spey rod, but your going to wear your shoulder out in no time if plan on high sticking. Your other option for those flies would be to use an indicator set up.

Most people who drift eggs and nymphs stick with 8-10 lb......if your swinging streamers go with 12 lb and up.

I personally would use a single hand rod for nymphs and eggs and use the spey rod for swinging flies.....
 

·
Addicted and Avid
Joined
·
583 Posts
Spey Fishing the Salmon River from October to May

I started fishing spey flies and bugger variations only on the Salmon about 3 years ago. I don't even know if I can find my eggs and glo-bugs anymore and that's ok with me. I've found that swinging medium to larger speys, even some sizable intruders works in October and November when the water temps are in the very low 50's and mostly mid to high 40's. Once the river really begins to cool, then I swing smaller versions of some of the same speys. In December, January and February and early March, when the water temp is hovering around 33 -36 degrees, I fish very sparse small speys and soft-hackles (size 6 - 10), SLOWLY and let them hang longer. I do a lot of mending with a floating line and no weight on the leader. Basic black, purple and then brightly colored small speys and soft-hackles seem to work pretty well. Even in the coldest months, you don't need to hug bottom, unless you want to spend most of your time sharpening dulled points and/or changing because you lost the fly to a rock, log or ball of 30lb test salmon line from the previous fall season. If you want to swing egg imitations, then tie up some double-egg sperm flies on a small salmon hook and swing through a faster trough of water where fish may be looking up as much as down for food. But, control the speed. In late March - April and especially in May, big anything, like large marabou speys, black or orange General Practitioners and Wooly Buggers from 1 1/2" to 4" work pretty damn well. Also, a brown and yellow marabou spey with a dark topping 1 1/2" to 3" long in October and November should get you some bigger browns, and the occasional steelhead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
You can also try comet and boss flies sz 2,4,6. They work very well in the deeper pools. I also prefer large stoneflies nymphs 12-8. Any variations in woolybuggers and egg sucking leeches. When the fish first enter the river I first use natural streamers like grey ghost, micky fins, muddlers ect. I also use atlantic salmon flies at this time as well. I do use some of the larger alaska style flies in early september into the first week of october. When entering october I start to use more eggs and nymphs. I keep a steady use of natural streamers, eggs, and nymphs until may.

Good Luck

Will
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
They all work, this river is stocked very heavily. I would be more focused on where your are going to go use these flies. Lots of areas aren't too freiendly due to crowds and currents...good luck it is a fun time for sure!
 

·
Swarner's Flies
Joined
·
1,400 Posts
Yes. Some of the guys I know use flies as long as 5" and some longer. Just make sure your hook gape isn't larger than 1/2"

October is bad for crowds....you will start to find room in November and more room when it gets colder.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top