Spey Pages banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking to buy a spey rod for $800 or less. I am looking for a versatile rod that I will primarily use on the McKenzie and the Willamette, with occasional trips to the Deschutes, Rogue, Umpqua, and Sandy. I have only been spey casting for a couple of years, and currently use a Cabela's LSi 12'6" 7wt.

I would appreciate any suggestions for rods I should consider. I am satisfied with the Cabela's rod, but I've convinced myself that I deserve an upgrade at this point.

I am intrigued by the Sage Accel, primarily because I love my 9' 4wt trout rod. I am also drawn to the Beulah Onyx, probably because it is beautiful. Neither of these seems like a particularly sound reason to pick a rod, so I would appreciate any input you might have.

Even though I know I probably should, I don't really want to wait for the Spey Clave. My local shop doesn't have demos to try.

This is my first post here, but I've lurked here enough to know that there is a ton of knowledge with this group. Thank you in advance for any advice you might have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
You have a myriad of choices within your budget outline. First however, what type of rod for what type of fishing? A 12'6" 7 weight is a good all around rod size and length generally. Are you looking for lighter/heavier. Switch rod for even more flexibility?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,052 Posts
keeper

You are right. You dont need an upgrade. On the other hand, if you want a rod because its pretty, that's a good enough reason.

Your Cabelas rod is a very fine rod. On one hand, you dont need another rod. On the other hand you need several.

Dont be fooled by marketing hype. I have heard, from sources reliable and otherwise that the Beulah Onyx has amazing dampening characteristics but I dont even know what that means.

I have a Carron competition rod that retailed for $2200 new, but I fish with Anglers Roost rods because I sometimes get swept downstream while fishing and drag my rods along the bottom and break them often and loose tip sections and stuff.

I've owned about 35 spey rods over the course of the last half dozen years and I dont know what to tell you except that 35 is nothing compared to what some members of this board own right now. But I am sure that you will get lots of input on what kind of rod to buy from people who barely know how to cast. Not that there is anything wrong with that. They very well may have the best advice available. I used to give advice all of the time until I realized I know nothing.

When I am tempted to buy a new rod I tell myself that when I have perfected every cast with either hand up with my old one I will need a new rod.

Here is is what you should do with your money. Book a guided trip with a really good guide who is an excellent caster and make him let you try as many line and rod combinations as he can. He will impulsively give you free casting advice because he has a fire in his bones and he cant shut up. This is good.

Or, get some casting lessons from a competent instructor who has lots of outfits and combos for you to try.

With the money left over you can still buy a really nice rod and have a better idea of what you want. Remember, you don't know what you don't know.

Spey rods are a lot like wives. If you work at it hard enough you can fall in love with the one you have and enjoy a long, satisfying, fulfilling, juicy relationship.

Or just get the Onyx.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
For your situation, these rods were suggested to me:

Scott L2H - $550
Loomis Pro 4x - $550
Echo 3 - $550
Beulah Platinum - $550
Meiser S2H - $635 (a little over $600)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
645 Posts
I've cast the 7136 Accel and liked it a lot. It blows the rod lineup it replaced ( VXP) out of the water. Fairly light in hand, nice feel. Easy to teach people to cast on this rod because they can feel the load. I liked it. Haven't cast the Onyx but I like the Sage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Olyfisher: I am looking for something pretty flexible. It is more important for me to be able to cast floating heads and lighter flies than Type 11 tips with 4 lb. moal leeches on them. I already own a switch rod. (To be completely forthcoming, I also own another 13' 8wt. Cabela's rod that I can use for winter fishing.)

I am at heart a gear hound, but I don't yet own a spey rod that I can just stare at with wonder on those mornings when the river is completely blown out and unwadeable. Plus, VW is giving me $500 for selling me an eco-friendly car that is actually slowly and silently killing the vulnerable folks in my neighborhood. That free money is burning a hole in my pocket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Sorry, floating tips (not heads). I expect to primarily, if not exclusively, use a skagit head with this rod.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
Caddis Fly? Or maybe buy used

Hey Willakenzie. If you're fishing those rivers then I'm guessing you're in the Eugene area. I've had great luck as a customer at The Caddis Fly in Eugene. I would at least get a look at something before you buy. They'd likely let you take a rod or two out to local water and cast a bit. They carry both those brands and lots of others in a similar price range. My other piece of advice would be to research rods here on spey pages (find out what some of the iconic rods in that weight class are) and buy used from another member. You could get a top of the line Sage, Loomis or even Burkie for under your budget if you're patient. Paying retail off the shelf is fine (and it keeps shops going), but you can often get more bang for your buck used. (I also like the thrill of the search). I will say I've had both Beulah and Sage rods and both customer service departments for rod repair have been positive experiences. Overall, sounds like you're in a good spot with a little money to burn. Also, aesthetics and pure enjoyment of ownership are fine reasons to buy another rod. Enjoy the process, AJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
It's really hard to select a rod off internet reviews without actually casting the rod. In the last six years, I think I've owned 15 different two-handed rods, never more than two or three at one time. Looking back, I liked quite a few very much but didn't care for others and kept searching for rods that I thought would fit my casting stroke and the rivers I fish better. I'm pretty happy with the two I own now and will likely hang on to them for some time, maybe add a third shorter winter stick to the mix. If I was in your shoes and fished the rivers you mention, and wasn't able to find a shop, clave, or friends to test cast, I'd consider that 1306 Meiser in the classified. It should be a great summer stick for the rivers you mention.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
946 Posts
Rod

My opinion is to get a used Sage One 13'6" for 8-weight. You can pick one up for between $500 and $600, If you do not like it, you can sell it for what you paid for it, but my guess is you will not be selling once you have cast it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Neither here nor there, but this is my favorite line ever about considering any rod:

"Dont be fooled by marketing hype. I have heard, from sources reliable and otherwise that the Beulah Onyx has amazing dampening characteristics but I dont even know what that means."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
The 7126 Accel is the best rod Sage currently makes but it's kind of silly expensive at $850 considering the finish and cork and lack of metal tube. The classic builds of the Burkheimers are only $100-125 more, I would look at 7127, 7134, 7133, 8128 if you want a "keeper" rod.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,052 Posts
Short answer

The “cheap” rod that you already have is every bit as good and possibly better than any $800 rod. You have been swept up in marketing hype to believe that an $800 fishing pole is $600 better than the $189 rod you now own. The cheaper rod may actually be the better rod. The only way to find out is to do a side by side comparison.
 
  • Like
Reactions: J.James

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
A couple years ago, I made a similar choice: I tested the Beulah Platinum Spey. It's my primary go-to rod now for chasing Atlantics in Canada. I absolutely love it -- and at that price point it's a great value. It's a nicer rod to cast than some twice the price, in my opinion.

Best,
Ben
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top