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Discussion Starter #1
I am trying to get a feel for the strengths/weaknesses of the 8136 vs. the 7141, and thought the opinion of board members would be a good place to start.

I am familiar with the different actions as outlined by the mfg.'er - but was hoping to get some more personal input from the board, like which one throws tips better, what RIO WC line sizes work, etc.

I heard that the 7141 is more of an 8wt than the 8136, but what do i know?

any advice?
 

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Pullin' Thread
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The 7141 is a much faster, stiffer rod than the 8136 although it is a true 7 wt. many folks overline it with an 8 wt in order to slow it down. The 8136 is a medium recovery rate, rather flexible, somewhat soft 8 wt that bends down into the butt section (into the cork when casting 70' or more), while the 7141 doesn't bend into the cork unless you are really reaching out there to 90' or so.

I have liked the 7141 when loaded with 6/7 mid-belly lines or the 6/7 SA XLT.The Windcutter I liked on it was the 6/7/8. The 8136 felt best to me with the 7/8/9 Windcutter or the 7/8 mid-belly lines. It didn't like the extended belly XLT at all.

Both of these rods are very well-made, very good casting and performing rods; however, their very different actions and flex profiles make them very different rods. If you like slower recovering, softer, more flexible rods that bend down into the butt section on most casts, you will be very happy with the 8136. If you like medium-fast, fast recovering, medium stiff, less flexible rods that don't bend to the butt section unless really putting the wood to the rod, you will like the 7141.
 

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Which rod would handle heads better, a line like a Rio Mid-Spey with the quad tips for example?
I'm looking for a lighter rod as well.
thanks
 

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Pullin' Thread
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Both of them work equally well with tips, provided you use the right line weight. The question really is which type of rod action do you like. The 7141 is a medium action, medium stiff rod; the 8136 if a medium-soft, less stiff, slower rod. Pick the one that has the action you like best and you will be a happy man.
 

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Jumbo

If you can take them on the water and cast them side by side, you will defininatley feel a difference both are excellent rods and I would have a hard time trying to pick between the two.

Brian
 

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loco alto!
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these two rods are nothing at all like each other, but to my senses, they achieve similar power through radically different tapers.
 

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I have never cast the 8136, and I own the 7141.

The 7141 excels at bringing tips out of the water with either the MS7/8 and tips including the Tip Compensator. It does well with the GS7/8 and tips, however, you know that you have been casting it after a few hours.

Yesterday, I tried the 7141 on the Ocean and parts of Bodega Bay. I had read about the 7141's ability to cast single handed deepwater lines with the overhand cast on Dan Blanton's board.

So I tried my favorite deep water line, the Rio Striper 26' DC 350 Grain line in the inlet of Bodega Bay on the rocks. The wind was from the North from 30 to 40 mph. I was able to roll cast it from the rocks due west about 40 to 60'. As with Meiser's Ocean, rod I could do a double or single spey after I set the line up on the retrieve. I had a small crowd watching this fun. I was not able to overhand cast.

Then, I moved over to the beach with the wind quartering behind me, and I was able to do an overhand cast for most of the running line with a size 4/0 Gummy Minnow. I roll cast the head with about 10 to 15' of running line to set up the overhand cast and shot most of the running line out my semi crippled overhand casts.

Next, I went to my new Rio Striper Versi-Tip Line with the 26' DC heads. I went to the 450 grain, and the 7146 preformed very well with this line and head combo. It not only shot the running line, on many casts it pulled off a few feet off the spool. It was easier to cast with the 250 grain head, but the wind messed with the lower weight on my back cast and my forward cast. I will have my son make me a 26' T14 head to try with this rod and line combo.

Yesterday, I had 4 single handed fly casters, who left their rods in their trucks/cars due to the high winds, come up to me during and after my casting to find out what rod I was using and what lines.

Summary: If you want a winter steelhead rod or a mid size surf/coastal rod, the 7141 with the Striper DC line or Striper DC Versi Tip, the 7141 might be the ticket. The rod performs well with the MS 7/8 with tips and the G/S 7/8 with tips.

It is a heavy rod and when balanced with a reel and some heavy line, you will know that you are casting a heavy rod. However, its ability to rip tips out of a river or an ocean and get them out where the fish are, is excellent. The small diameters of the rod at its butt and the tip combined with its stiffness enables me to cut through the wind with minimal effort versus a rod with larger diameters and more flexibility.

The 7141's factory handle grip/cork was big even for my X-large hands. Bob Meiser made the grip smaller in diameter, easier to handle and more aerodynamic. If you are interested in a 7141, have Meise build you one to make sure the grip fits you.
 
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