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Discussion Starter #1
I am sure many of you have experience with Ross Reel BG Canyon reels.
It is well know that drag system on this reel is great, but how it performs when reel is immersed in water.
( fresh water situations only)

Thanks is advance
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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I've had no problems with my BG-7 used for double-duty as a spey reel for medium sized lines and as a saltwater two-hander reel with short compact heads.

I rinse religiously after immersion in salt. Sand getting in does make it's presence known, like chewing tin foil.

Drag may become a touch lighter after immersion but nothing worth worrying about at least for mine.

I like the reel a lot and it's a great price performance level reel, although it would really take my appreciation to the next level if the spool cap and drag knob were metal instead of plastic.

That's the reel on the Atlantis 1111a to the left in my image.

.02
 

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BG Drag

I have had several of the Ross reels with the same drag system for several years and I have never noticed any problems after getting them wet. I keep them clean and try not to get sand and dirt in them and so far no problems. Last winter I had problems with the spool freazing on my BG5 so the only solution to that problem was to avoid dunking the reel.
 

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they all do it

If you dunk a reel and it is below freezing, you can expect some problems. I was fishing the Clearwater a couple of years ago when the air temperature was 17 (F). I was using a short head and had to dunk the rod every couple of casts to get the ice off to make the next cast. Unfortunately I also dunked the reel. When I tried to reel in, It was frozen solid. fortunately no steelhead took advantage of it.
 

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I think that the drag is fine when it gets wet, but the clutch is very sensitive to suspended grit. It woould not stop me from fishing the reel except in the surf. These are nice reels.
 

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Mr. Mom
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625 Posts
Last fall in Baja I was in the middle of a wideopen yellowfin, skippy, and dorado bite. Wave after wave of fish. I fell in the panga's bait tank, hurt like a mutherhubbard, but sprang up, grabbed another rod and kept fishing. Left the rod and reel in the tank. It was a canyon BG. after fifteen minutes or so pulled it out of the tank, and it wouldn't free spool anymore (you know what I mean by freespool). According to the owner it still doesn't.

This in NO WAY hurt the fishability of the reel. The lowest drag settings were and still are absolutely smooth, but the reel was permanently affected.

Would I buy one? probably not for a variety of reasons. Would I talk someone out of one? Nope. But what do I know, I fish a vortex in the surf :hehe:
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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OK, the same thing just happened to me but due to use in the briny surf. I've been using it extensively and although a dose of suspended sand does require a rinse the drag is unaffected by sand. Salt on the other hand, is a problem.

The drag would not loosen even when the knob was opened so I whipped out the screwdriver and went in for an exploratory.

I popped off the logo plate and that exposed a retaining ring on a stainless recessed flange-nut (hex head) that sits inside the knob. If you turn the knob to loosen the space between the retaining ring and the flange increases so it's easier to remove. Absolutely clean as a whistle so far.

I removed the ring and turned the knob additionally to loosen the hex/nut/flange. This reveals the tightening washers for the drag system, a series of (a) soft rubber washer (b) stainless washer 1 (b) thin washer of slick material of some sort (c) stainless washer 2.

These pile up against a hex nut that is the backside of the drag plates where the spindle comes through the body. This was coated with a thick layer of corrosion, which was also on the stainless washer it mates with. I cleaned the surfaces throughly and the drag operates as good as new. But I am concerned that within the cavity that the knob encases, the washer system that actuates friction and tension on the drag discs can hold water and develop a layer of corrosion that affects the operation of the reel.

To help combat this:

- you could store the reel with the knob completely loosened and pointed downward after thoroughly rinsing to help drain the cavity

- one could apply a healthy dose of lube to help keep that inner-most but/flange surface from developing a layer of corrosion although it's kind of a pain in the ass to get at that bottom assy

- Ross could seal the cavity somehow (e.g. o-rings) and eliminate the problem

The good news is it was an easy fix once the problem was revealed. The reality is, this is not a true sealed drag system but the fact that a corroded washer system only made the drag act normal in a fishable setting was pretty impressive. As Philster said it was certainly fishable even though not very adjustable.

It operates like brand new now; I am certain yours will too given that little 'operation'.
 

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RBG Drag

The last time I had my RBG reel drag apart I recall the same corrosion or buildup. I used a very thin film of water proof grease on the Delrin washer. I believe it is "Phill" grease its sold in the bike shop. This seems to help keep the gunk out.

I think here is allot of talk about what is the best reel, or best drag or weather something is any god at all. Its mostly talk though and what it all boils down to is what you can afford whether it works for you, and how you take care of what you have. Mostly the latter. As an example no fly reel is going to last if you lay it down in the dirt or leave it in the tackle bag after a salt water trip.

Now that Im on the subject.

Maybe part of being a competent fly fisher is being able to field strip and clean your reel without losing any parts. I carry a repair and maintenance kit which fits in the palm of my hand and has everything I need to fix my reels, replace a guide on a rod, splice a line etc. If you interested I can post a list of what is in it.
 

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Mr. Mom
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Hey Natrix

The grease is "Phil Woods" ?

Tackle prep and maintenance is big. I recall a post earlier on Abel reels and one guy who owns them, but won't use them for steelhead because he has drag problems when the reels get wet.

He knows they require maintenance, but chooses not to oil the cork, and knows that the result will be an undependable drag, so he doesn't use the reel. That's his choice, and more power to him, but as you pointed out, it doesn't make the Abel a bad reel.

As to field maintenance there are three rules:

1. Have the tools and parts you might need on your person or in a close vehicle

2. NEVER work on a reel when you are around sand

3. Never work on a reel whe you are around sand :D
 
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