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I have noticed in the pictures of flies that most Intruders have lead eyes. Knowing this is done primarily to get the patterns down is it also like saltwater flies with eyes, to get the fly to ride with the eye side down? If so do you set up the trailer hook to ride with the point up or the point down in relation to the eyes. Appreciate your response. Anyone really need to catch a tarpon on an Intrudewr? Its really good right now. Thanks
 

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You are right, the lead eyes serve a dual purpose. The first is to get/keep the fly down, Intruders have a large profile and the eyes counter this and allow good depth. Secondly, the hook is turned up away from the eyes (and the bottom).

I don't know about tarpon, but I did catch a couple of stripers in the Monomoy surf on a squiddly-looking Intruder.
 

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I like to add lead eyes to avoid spinning of the fly and get a good steady presentation of the side view.Another reason ,not yet mentioned,is to add a little possibility of a jiggy action.When my fly hits a softer current seam ,I want the head to dip or fall downward to look like a disabled critter.I also like the eyes for looks.I also like to add jungle cock.I feel these two additions bring out the predator reflexes.Beau
 

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Saltsprey
I mount the trailer with the point up relative to the eyes, while I do not fish these flies "on the stones" one does occasionaly find bottom (a risk with any weighted fly fished over an uneven bottom) and this arrangement results in less chance of snagging bottom and loosing a fly.
As mentioned by Beau the weighted eyes give a very attractive "jigging" action - I use the eyes more for this action than to obtain depth.
speydoc
 

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Jack Cook
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Article

In the Fish & Fly article Ed said from his point of view the eyes were to give the fly a straight path in the water, no rolling. He said he did not want big eyes which would cause it to drag on the bottom.

For my $$ a fly this big with this much stimulus does not need to hit them in the nose. They will pick it up aggressively or leave the pool. The first option is the best one. I believe this to be true as so many folks I have taught this pattern to mention that the takes are fierce with these big patterns compare to other flies they have caught fish on.

O remember in a Dec Hogan article about Ed that when the Intruder was being worked out as a pattern the goal was to get the biggest grabs possible. From my experience it is a success.
 

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The EYES have it

What size eyes are most of you using on your Intruders?

I generally use 1/20 oz. and 1/30 oz., tied on hook-shank flies, and at times go heavier tied on plastic tubes. I find they do react slightly different in the water when tying them on plastic tubes.

I have never read Ed mentioning what weight or range of weights he prefers?

Also, do you use different eye weights if you are fishing a Skagit set up, opposed to a mid-belly or long-belly line?
 

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Jack Cook
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Depends

I use 5/32 on the bugs I tie most. I have had requests for 7/32 and I have seen some REALLY big eyes on some. I agree with Ed that dragging on the bottom is not the goal here. And a 35mm Shank plus 5/32 eyes plus a 1/0 hook is a lot of weight already......
 

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I use 7/32 eyes on mine late in the fall and winter, so i can use a dry line till
the end of the T season Dec 31. Plastic tubes, and they tend to be fairly BIG!!
Cheers..
 
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