Spey Pages banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,736 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
this pertains mainly to double speys and circles/snap T's/.

Once you have completed the initial moves and are ready to proceed into the D loop what are your thougths on rod path?

I saw Simon address this at one of his demonstrations a few years ago and Jeff Putnam spends considerable time on this subject in his dvd's. They both talk about a straight line rod path. Rather than a swinging around arc up to the firing position, they suggest that you push out with the hands/arms ending with the rod tip pointing at your target, then you pull straight back with the arms into the firing position. This seems to do two things - helps keep the anchor closer to the body and not send it out to the side and also helps keep the D loop lined up with the forward cast.

Anyone do things differently? Does it change if throwing short heads/skagit vs long bellies?
 

·
loco alto!
Joined
·
3,109 Posts
I find that the approach described above is best used with stiffer, fast action rods, and especially when tossing longer lines. You throw the line outwards, then pull and throw it back into the D loop. In each step the rod is loading and unloading. It is very dynamic. A soft rod doesn't seem to handle it very well, all that loading and unloading in such short order, the line's inertia outwards ends up maneuvering the rod instead of the other way around. In my hands, softer rods do better with the continuous load imparted by a traditional type sweep.
 

·
chrome-magnon man
Joined
·
5,375 Posts
I use both approaches. I fish mostly mid-head and longer belly lines but this approach also works with Skagits--you just have to be a little less aggressive.

I do find the two-part D loop setup a little less pleasing from the relaxed casting standpoint. While it is more dynamic, it has less grace and flow to it. With the traditional sweep around style you can still get excellent rod loading as long as you apply the power directly opposite the intended target. The sweep around is done in a relaxed effortless fashion by simply keeping the rod bent and the line tight. Once the rod tip is pointing @45 degrees downstream pull back and up with as much acceleration as you need to form you D loop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
I'm very interested in hearing more from the experts on this topic as well. Through the years, I've been vexed by how to best form a D-loop using a short, heavy shooting head. Observing all the experts just confused me more because I didn't understand the nuances among different styles AND practioners. Long head versus short was easy enough, but it was the nuances among the many expert practitioners using short heads in the PNW that were most confusing. To my eyes at least, they are all different. Just watch the PNW casters shown on the RIO video along with others like Kinney, Hogan, et al. Even if those differences are subtle, not understanding the differences meant significant frustration the learning curve. I feel pretty comfortable now and I've settled on starting slow, accelerating smoothly in circular motions, and keeping constant tension. Nothing new but there's a chasm between knowing the principles and applying them. What I don't do is stop the rod tip to form a D-loop. I think I am decelerating to almost a stop when I'm about to turn over and start my forward stroke, but the tip is still moving even if slowly. I don't think I form a v-loop but there is enough tension for the casts to be long (80' for me is usually way more than enough), focused, turn over fully, and snap to the reel.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top