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Discussion Starter #1
OK I admit it - I am bored!! Rivers are blown and I had to reach to come up with a topic! Rod Grip Shape. It seems to me that a very gentle, relaxed grip of a two handed rod is much more critical in performing a good cast than say for a single handed rod. You can have a death grip on a single handed rod and still make a reasonable cast though you will soon tire out. With a two handed rod, a death grip really seems to destroy the cast. WHY? - Another topic for another day?

I am a fan of Scott rods - their grips are quite large and kind of a double wells. A number of friends who have picked up my rods do not care for this large diameter grip and many rods I have tried have much smaller diameter cork grips. But if you hold your hand so it is totally relaxed the fingers are somewhat curled in a semi-open postion. It takes some effort to have the hand fully open and some effort to have the hand closed (into a fist or tight grip). Thus the large diameter cork grip seems to help keep the hand in a relaxed position. Smaller diameter grips would tend to cause the caster to grip a bit more tightly? Just my thoughts and observations on another rainy day. STOP ALREADY!!
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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This is primarily a matter of taste, but I disagree. I tend to use a very light grip, in fact practice with a pad of my index finger and thumb a lot. A high-quality cork material and a streamlined profile make it very easy to cast with a light touch.

The sleeker diameter is also more accomodating to a range of casting styles where the big cork requires a clenching grip since it doesn't cradle in the hand with the fingers loosened to manage loops of line.

Of course one man's poison is another's medicine, and thus it started as a matter of taste and I am sure will end up one at the end of the thread.
 

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Pullin' Thread
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Juro,

You are right on rod grip size being as personal as rod action you like. And I like a grip that has some meat on it. Even the Scott's are too small in diameter for me. I like the diameter of the T&T and GLX rods because you get some meat to wrap your hand around. I hate those wimply little grips on the Winston rods.
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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To add more to the personal taste discussion, some grips are really short. At 5'8" I have very average length arms (DaVinci's arm breadth == height principle) but they are still too long for some of the rod grips that are out there on double-handed rods.

Yet some really like the closed hand position and can back it up with great casting. Different strokes I guess, literally.

The great thing about it is we have so many good choices!
 

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EAT IT!!!
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Well if we are going to pass our bordem talking about grip shapes, I suppose my thoughts won't hurt, though grip shape and size is completely a personal thing. I think we can all agree that a death grip does no one any good when Spey casting or single handed casting for that matter. I used to be a fan of big grips, but the past two seasons I have found that my hands cramp up a little when I am wearing gloves and fishing with a fat grip. Skinnier grips work better (for me) when I am wearing my gloves, which it seems I often am when fishing a two hander. A grip that feels comfortable without gloves, is often uncomfortable with them on, so I would tend to error more on the side a more narrow grip, as it works both ways. Maybe I have a tendency to grip the rod too tightly when it is cold out and this is the cause of my discomfort. Next time I fish in gloves, I'll pay more attention to this. Well, that is enough grip babble for me, Rick, I hope your rivers clear soon!
 

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Oh come on Rick, you know you wish your Scott had grips on it like my Burkie. Adios, I'm off to Playa del Carmen. John :smokin:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
John, John....

It seems that you are the one who had to have a shoulder operation - this came about soon after you got this rod with a skinny little grip!!!

If you had a rod with a man sized grip you would be going on our trip in February instead of Bruce while you sit home recovering!!

Per Juro's comment, another thing I like about the Scott grip is they are long enough. The wider grip especially the flare at the top lets me keep my thumb and forfinger spaced and not clamping down on a skinny section of the grip - for me it helps to keep a very relaxed grip on the rod
 

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In actual practice, I can handle most grips with no trouble. However, for aesthetic reasons, I like an upper grip that tapers to small diameter behind the front flare, on smaller rods, say for #8 lines and lighter. The grip on the ol' brownie Sage 9140-4 is a good example, although it's nearly too short.
Bottom grips deserve a mention. They shouldn't be too short; about 5-1/2" is good, slightly convex in profile. And we could do another poll about the preferred size, shape, and material of butt caps.
 

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I used to be a fan of big grips, but the past two seasons I have found that my hands

That pretty well covers it for me too. Have 'smallish' hands so 'fat grips' are a royal pain. Actually had Meiz' cut back the grip on my GL3 as it felt like I was holding onto the 'fat end' of a baseball bat. Loved the rod for years, but the fat grip always drove me nuts.

Agree with other comments above, manufactures frequently build the handles far too short. This would be my 'main complaint' about Sage rods.
 
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