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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking for a steelhead rod that I will only fish tips with. I would like it to be 15' but it doesn't have to be that long. Price is not much of a concern. I prefer the more traditional actions but I am flexible there as well.
Thanks
Mike
 

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Thats a pretty broad spectrum, What size tips? summer or winter? Long lines or the shorter heads? My two fav's are the steelhead cnd and the cnd salar for winter tip work and early summer with long lines. The steelhead is equally at home with the short heads as well but have to get the grain weight up.

Brian
 

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Pullin' Thread
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Traditional meaning full-flexing, and fast recovery like the CND Custom, or full-flexing and slow like the Sage 9140 or the Lamiglas 14'6" 9/10?
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I was thinking of a rod for winter and spring fishing with more of a full flexing action. Basically a rod like the sage 8150 but with more power. I mostly fish 15' tips up to type six on a windcutter or midspey, with a little lead core every now and then.
Mike
 

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Pruple,

It seems like the CND Skagit Cast Specialist would fit your bill well. It has a full flexing traditional action but with the "balls" to handle heavy tips the big fish of spring. At the same time its IM8 graphite makes it very light in the hand. For strictly tip fishing this is my rod of choice. You could do a Forum search for some of the extensive threads re this rod.
 

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might consider the Scott ARC 1509 - this is a medium fast progressive action rod but casts tips very well.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
results

I have narrowed the field down to these:

Sage 9150
CND Stealhead sp
loop yellow 14' 9wt
CND Skagit sp
ARC 1509

Your thoughts
Mike
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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Choosing between the CND Steelhead and Skagit Specialists would be tough for me... they each have endearing characteristics that I've come to appreciate and I am glad I can cast and fish them both ;)

The Steelhead at 14'4" is a bit more powerful through it's upper regions and has a very authoritative taper that allows the caster to add a little stroke length, accelerate smoothly and really put a long line out there. It has been described by dealers and fishermen as being a rod that casts well with "any line" meaning any line within it's grain range, which appears to be very broad unlike some rods that are quite picky. I chose the Steelhead Specialist for my FFF cert test because it pretty much does anything you ask, including making the distance casts without breaking a sweat even under pressure.

But the Skagit is very light in the hands as Kush mentions, and has such excellent power transfer from it's willing tip, feel-good midsections down to a very deep reserve of surprising power in the butt that work really well with the more relaxed and circular motions that help keep sinktips moving despite additional water tension. It has been designed and field-proven by the authorities in fishing sinking tips with shorter heads and gnarly flies, passing field tests by the most scrutinous of river addicts with flying colors.

Both of these rods are superb dry line rods as well. The Steelhead is a great extended belly dry line rod with the guts to launch the big lines to cover great river expanses, in fact I would not hesitate to fish it on the Cowlitz or even the Thompson with a long belly line (although the Salar or Thompson Specialist would provide a some advantages there).

The Skagit is such a light agile rod that it makes a great summer run rod, and with a mid-length floater and that sweet tip you can throw laser beam loops with a little underhand tuck or switch to tips to reach into the reserve power in the butt anytime you want to get down and dirty.

Both are CND exclusive IM8 aerospace-grade graphite 4-pc rods with alum tubes in a distinct sagebrush finish with titanium framed SiC tip guide and hard chrome SiC Fuji strip guides, premium hardware throughout and have Mr.Nodera's "magic touch".

Tough choice, but I would base my decision on length of line you want to fish and summer/fall techniques you prefer. If you want a broad range of line styles from long belly lines cut with tips looped on, to mid-length w/ tips to shorter heads I would go for the Steelhead. It will also give you the extended belly summer long line rod.

If you plan to fish more conventional shorter heads with tips, and you're interested in Skagit casting in tighter quarters, also would like a lighter summer duty sweetheart then the Skagit is the way to go.

Good luck with your decision,
Juro
 

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Junkyard Spey
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Hey pruple_spey...

Your question can not really be answered by anyone else but you. The rods you have listed are all fine pieces of spey fishing equipment suited to the task you've stated. While I am in no way playing down the answers you have received from some very experienced spey casters the only sure way to know which of these rods suit your casting style and ability is to take them to the river and try them in "real world" conditions with your sink tip lines. Anything else is a guess.
Take care, MJC
 

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Excellent advice MJC - the only way to decide is to get out and cast them :smokin:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Final two

Well I have cast my way down to these two rods: Sage 9150 and the CND Steelhead Sp. I would like your opinions on how these two rods stack up aginst each other when casting tips. I did not get to cast either rod on water with tips so I may be missing something.
Thanks
Mike
 

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I have both the loop yellow 9140 and the Cnd Skagit. For me, I like the yellow for dry line work. The Skagit seems to be my goto rod for tip work. Now if I didn't have a 14 foot rod, I might be tempted to buy the Steelheader. To really make a good decision to buy, I would spend all day with each rod on the water using the heaviest tip. And I mean the Sage on Monday, Steelheader on Wednesday and the Skagit on Friday with the same line running a type 6 tip or heavier. By Saturday morning, you will know which rod you want.
 

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on the water

There's really no substitute for water time in selecting a rod. If there's any way you can test out the 9150 beside the Steelhead Specialist, with the type of line/water/presentation you plan to fish most, one with feel more right than the other. There are sponsors on this forum who can help you arrange that kind of testing if you're not within decent driving range of a dedicated spey shop. Personally, I don't think you could go wrong with either rod. But if you're going to put down the dollars, you should get the right rod for you. It's so much more enjoyable.
Carl
 

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Junkyard Spey
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Steelhead Specialist Test Drive...

Howdy Mike,

There are several CND dealers in Oregon one of which should be able to arrange a test drive for the Steelhead Specialist. If for some reason that can't be arranged I may be able to help you. Take care, MJC
 

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Golly, Juro, some of this should be ad. copy!

juro said:
...the Skagit ...such excellent power transfer from it's willing tip, feel-good midsections down to a very deep reserve of surprising power...designed and field-proven by the authorities in fishing sinking tips with shorter heads and gnarly flies, passing field tests by the most scrutinous of river addicts with flying colors.

Lot's of good other good stuff in your post, but these words cast a beautiful loop into the wind that unfurled and floated to the surface nicely. And I thought the feel-good midsection was what I keep telling my wife I'm growing on top of my belt! :D

Carl
 
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