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Hello, and thank you in advance for your help and insight.

I need some perspective on my practice. I started spey fishing for Atlantic salmon in 2020. I was lucky, I caught a salmon shortly after I started.
I learned the roll cast, the double spey, and the snap T. I felt I was missing quite a bit of practice and strings to my bow, so for this 2022 season, I practiced hard and learned to cast single spey, and snake roll. I haven't mastered the latter yet.

That's what I managed to do in 2 years. I even took a class to better myself.

But. I've had a dark cloud over my head since last summer. My first spey rod (Chromer) broke off while fishing for striped bass, during the cast. It was very windy that day and I thought the weather conditions were responsible for the accident (strong headwinds, strenuous anchoring, etc.).
I received a Claymore in exchange since the Chromer was discontinued.
This morning, after 3 hours of fishing, the new Claymore I received from warranty broke cleanly at the second strand, and the noise was so loud that my partner on the other side of the river heard it loud and clear. That new rod has fished two whole days and has caught only one salmon (an average one, tbh).

I am devastated. To break a rod once while casting, I can understand. Random bad luck. But I don't believe in coincidences.
I've had lessons, I know how to anchor, and my casts sometimes lack consistency. Sometimes I push too hard instead of relaxing and letting go of the pressure I feel to perform in front of others.

Are my casts that bad? To the extent of breaking rods? Honestly, I can't help but wonder. I was already suspicious because I had already broken one. So I took great care of this one, I never put it on the ground, always on the supports, vertically. I don't have a rod mount so I systematically put them back in their tube for transport.

I know I'm on a specialist forum. I know there may be millions of reasons I'm experiencing all these bad lucks. I was just wondering if in your experience, a noob could break a rod while being too rough during the casts. Cause that's what I feel and it's quite humbling.

Thank you for your input. I'm ashamed to go to my fly shop and have them send it in for warranty again. I live in a small town and everything gets out so fast...
Look, if I didn't break a rod in the beginning with all the mess I made (including overloading it) ... it seems exaggerated that you blame yourself like that.
It will pass, after all it is a question of emotionally elaborating "the mourning". ;)
Rather, maybe just out of superstition, change brand! 😂
As for the small town ... I live in a small private street where everyone knows everything about everyone and, frankly, I don't give a damn about it. 🤣
Ciao,
Marco
 

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Hitting air is not just casting the rod without a line it’s where your actually casting a line and you hit air in that there is slack in the line then it comes under tension.
Seen it lots at speyclaves and there was a guy known for it at one clave in particular who was not a good caster but a really big boy who took great pleasure in smashing demo rods 🤷🏻‍♂️😜
Hi Bruce,
what is the explanation of the event? A motorcycle similarity came to mind: high side (loss-recovery of grip, compression-extension of the single shock absorber). In short, an excess of conflicting and uncontrollable forces. Is this a wrong hypothesis?
Thank you!
Marco
 
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