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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think I don't know quite enough about grain weights, line weights, and head lengths, etc. to figure this out on my own, but:

(BTW, seriously considering a Meiser 11'7 5/6/7 and hoping my exisiting 8wt Rio Versitip will suffice as an overhead line, saving the expenditure for the WC and possibly a new reel)

A WC multi-tip with the middle section removed leaves a multi-tip line with a 37.5 ft. head. I don't know the grain weight, but with the middle section still in (at 48.5 ft), it's 365 grains.

The Versitip 8wt is a 38ft head at 260 grains.

How do these really compare? Is the 11' WC middle section around 100 grains?
Is an 8wt overhead (single-handed) line really heavier than a (5/6)7 wt. WC spey line?

Should I quit worrying about and just try my damn line on the Meiser rod at Aaron's on Saturday?

Thanks for the help!

Tom
 

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Junkyard Spey
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Hey Tom...

Should I quit worrying about and just try my damn line on the Meiser rod at Aaron's on Saturday?

Yes! Besides Aaron has all the answers to your questions in his head.
 

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Hi Tom,

The 11'7" likes lots of lines, and we have a good data base on that, and your right Aaron has a ton of lines.

<> Lines generally in the 340 to 480 grain range....More allowed grains with shooting head line systems.

350 Skagit, or longer bellied Scando style heads to 40' in the 350 to 420 head grain weight range <> Especially the 39' head Hardy Mach-1 8/9 Salmon for overhead/underhand work.

Short belly speys like the new Hardy Mach-1 for 8/9, WC for 6/7/8, SA short belly Spey for 6/7, or 6/7 standard belly Airflow.

If your thinking two handed overhead, you may consider the new Rio Outbounds in the 420 grain range, utilizing whatever sink rate will best meet your applications.

Their head length at 37.5' is perfect for cold water overhead work, and the grain distribution within the taper is just right to acheive max distance with very little effort. Pretty easy to throw the whole line once you get your timing down.

The line at 37.5' will not dump in the back, and will lay out sweet and fully extended on the shot.

They also spey quite well with underhand power in the same grain window.

Your single hand Rio Versi-tip for 8 wt may be a bit grain shy.

Sounds like your WC at 365 is a 5/6 wt.?

What reel do you presently have....May not have to replace it if you choose a shooting head system.

Meiz
 

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Junkyard Spey
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How about the Hardy Mach 1 + Multi-tip for the 11'7"?
I believe that line will be to heavy. That 5/6 WC you were talking about should be a nice match. Also a 9/10/11 WC belly with a 12'-95 (or so)grn tip will give you a 38' skagit line that should rock. The latter should easily fit on that reel you are considering using.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Boy, it's so confusing! Mid-belly, short belly, Skagit style....

I will pick Aaron's brain on Saturday. Meanwhile, could someone direct me to the most basic info on Spey lines? Something with lots of pictures and small words?

Thanks again,

Tom
 

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Junkyard Spey
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Hey Tom...

Don't be daunted by all the various lines. Meiser has already told you the grain windows. Something that most of the other rod builders could do to endear themselves to the spey consumer.

You do not need lots of pictures and small print as you have "Speybum" for advice. That guy has forgotten more then most of us will ever know about spey lines and how to match them to rods.

A look at Rio's or Rajeff's site will answer most of your questions about the various head lengths and the different options available.

http://www.rioproducts.com/index.asp
http://www.rajeffsports.com/
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
MJC,

Thanks for the direction, but I don't think I was clear enough--I meant BASIC basic, like what makes a spey line different from an overhead line, and why (I've gathered so far that the basic nature of spey casting requires a certain amount of heft in the middle part of the line, since the forward part is involved in the anchor, and is last to become airborne). Then there's the whole Skagit casting, scando heads, underhanded casting, traditional casting... and how various line set-ups relate to all that.

An analogy would be, oh, say, building a house. Experienced carpenters know all about framing exterior walls vs. interior walls. vs. load-bearing walls, while a novice would need to start with "This is a 2x4, your basic framing material. It's useful for interior walls. This is a 2x6, which is different from a 2x4 because it's wider. It's used for exterior walls. This is a hammer. These are nails...." You get the idea. (This is a long-bellied spey line. It's used for this reason. This is a Skagit head set-up. This is a shooting head system. Blah, blah, blah.)

Anyway, pretty dirt-simple basic. I'll do a search on this site, and meanwhile, I welcome any book or video recommendations!

Tom
 

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Tom

Look at the line reviews on Spey Pages. Dana does a good job explaining the differences between different types of spey lines.

Real basic, the overhead requires the rod to lift the entire weight of the line and uses it all to load the rod. A spey line is usually longer and heavier than an overhead line, because different mechanics do not use all of the line mass to load the rod.

Dana has some excellent material available to supporting members that discusses the mechanics of different spe casts, so if you have not joined, send him the money and get some great information.
 
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