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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know the textbook definition of what a regressive action is in a fly rod. However, I could use a little more insight. What are the applications, advantages and disadvantages of a spey rod that has regressive action?

Thanks,
David
 

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JD
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According to Mies

When I asked Bob to elaborate on the regressivve action, his reply was the classic Jimmie Green stiff tip mid to butt section flex. To which I asked "you mean like the old 9140-4 brownie"? His answer was yes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Regressive Rods

JD,

That is generally what I thought. I heard that some, but not all, of the Burkie rods are regressive.

Thanks. I am just trying to learn the subtleties of our sport.

David
 

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To me regressive action means a very even flex profile through the whole blank. When combined with quality graphite and of course a good taper desighn the result can be a rod that loads with relative ease and unloads like a cannon with the proper application of power from the caster.
 

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This sounds like yet another one of those subjective rod measures that no one really can quantify. (With the exception of some rod designers like Mr. Nodera and Mr Meiser.) But there is a reason these names keep coming up. They design rods that have a good feeling to a large number of people. Rather than concerning yourself with the differences and applications of progressive vs. regressive find a designer whose rods "feel" good to you and use their rods.

Unless you are aspiring to be a rod designer you don't need to know the difference between progressive vs. regressive. To be honest I'm not so sure that Mr Meiser or Mr. Nodera think progressive vs. regressive. I think they visualize a taper and how it is going to perform. They tweak the taper in their mind until it looks right. Then they build one and try it. They see how close they came and tweak it until they have exactly what they want. Then they let their "friends" try it and they incorporate any feedback from them into the taper. They go around this cycle a few times and a new rod design pops out. After a decade or two the designer gets to the point where he may only have to go around the cycle once or maybe twice on a tough design.
 

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Bob Meiser

will hopefully weigh in to set us all straight. As I understand it in talking with him, to regress is to slow/soften the taper toward the but. If that is not done, it would be very difficult to get much work out of the but section. It would take too much effort for regular casting. You still can have a progressive response from the rod, and a fast to medium fast rod. The but section is easier to load and unload, so you get energy our easier.

When Bob speaks we can see how far off I am in interpretating.
 

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Once again it is in the archives:

http://www.speypages.com/speyclave/showthread.php?t=17926&page=3&highlight=regressive

Check out the last post of Bobs.

And Geoff you can feel the difference, you just have to have been casting for longer than a month :)

Bob makes both tapers. The MKS being more of a regressive nature and the highlanders are more progressive actions.

I like fast progressive rods as I like to keep the rod load in the top and middle section of the rod. The progressive taper is better at doing this than the regressive.

-sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Understanding

I read that thread and now I understand. It also makes Meiser's rod descriptions (on his site) make more sense.

Thanks,
David
 

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sean said:
Once again it is in the archives:
Sort of. The post describes aspects of regressive vs. progressive but NOT applications.

sean said:
I've been reading some of the back posts and found this one a day or two ago. I need to learn a bit more before I fully grok it.

Reading this post I get the impression Bob likes a progressive tip with a regressive mid and butt section. The tip allows you to rip lots of wieght and the regressive lower end allows you to feel what is happening in that progressive tip. If the whole rod was progressive you'd feel like you were swinging a broom handle.

sean said:
And Geoff you can feel the difference, you just have to have been casting for longer than a month :)
:razz: C'mon. Give the new guy a break. I'm trying.

sean said:
Bob makes both tapers. The MKS being more of a regressive nature and the highlanders are more progressive actions.

I like fast progressive rods as I like to keep the rod load in the top and middle section of the rod. The progressive taper is better at doing this than the regressive.

-sean
I haven't casted enough to really know but I think I'd prefer a more regressive rod. I like to make a long slow cast and let the rod do all the work. But that may be because I'm getting old and tired. :(
 

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C'mon. Give the new guy a break. I'm trying.


Geoff,

Maybe you are trying too hard. You have made 155 posts in a month and a half. You have been casting for about the same period of time and in a number of posts, you come off as somewhat of an expert. You will find the members of the SpeyPages to be very giving of their time and experience for new people. You will also find that they will just ignore the self-appointed Spey-Gods that cycle through from time to time.

Spey casting is a lot like golf in that you can get the basics in a short time but to perfect it takes coaching and lots and lots of practice. You would be best served to pick a style, read what ever you can about it, limit your input to questions about it and above all; practice, experiment and work to perfect it.

sinktip
 

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Geoff,

You really don't understand what Meiser was talking about. His Highlander Series rods are progressive action. Just because the mid and bottom sections are a bit regressed from a true progressive increase in blank diameter and/or wall thickness as the blank moves from its tip to its butt does not mean the rod is not a progressive action. Meiser is really talking about how a rod with a substancial, stiff tip that helps aerialize long lengths of line or heavy sink tips can then be made into a very fine casting tool that is not overly stiff, while still maintaining a progressive action through the judicious small incremental regression of its middle and butt.

Also, just because a rod is a true regressive, it doesn't mean the rod is doing the work, anymore than a fast, progressive rod requires the caster to do all the work. The truth is that any rod requires the caster to "work" and energize the rod properly whether the rod is a slow, regressive or a fast, progressive one.

Once you understand these things, Meiser's descriptions of progressive and regressive along with how they are utilized in designing a rod make perfect sense.
 
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