Spey Pages banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a Scott SAS 9 wt 14 foot rod on sale and will be learning how to use it soon. Unfortunately I am on a tight budget and need a reel and line before the salmon and steelhead season gets in full swing. has anyone had experience with the Okuma Integrity?? also is it worth the extra $ for an interchageable tip line?? I like the looks of the SA spey/salmon line...

thanks,
Matt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
wallis_matt:

A friend of mine uses the Okuma reels and speaks rather highly of them in their "value for the dollar". He rarely is required to use the drag systems though. So far my personal experience to "value" end drag systems is limited to SA's System 2 reels. I have some of their reels on some of my salt water rigs and thus far the drags have held up fairly well. You might do some comparisons of the Okhuma and SA drag components.

Keep in mind that when you get lots of line out that the "smoothness" of a drag can be a huge factor. The gear effect caused by the smaller ration of diameter on the spool can greatly effect the drag felt at the fish. The last thing you are going to want is to have a fish that is capable of pulling off 100' of backing then having your drag start to surge.

When you start talking about hot fish, your equipment is only as good as it's weakest link. At least you are taking the trouble to do the research.

John
 

·
Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
Joined
·
1,771 Posts
When I worked behind the counter at a flyshop I always advised that if you're going to end up upgrading anyway you might as well buy something that is not going to be upgraded too fast. Spend a little extra and get something that you'll only need to upgrade for prestige reasons, not due to performance.

I would guess that with all the brands and models out there spending at least a couple of hundred to start would be a better investment than $150 first, then more a short while later.

Or look on ebay for a used reel being sold in that range perhaps. How much is the Okuma, what's the top of his range?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
While I have yet to try the Okuma myself, I have sold numerous Integ10/11 for beginner Spey set ups with no problems. In fact one guy who bought the reel as a backup now uses it instead of his HardyMLA. This guy fishes 4 days a week and quite literaly breaks everything he comes into contact with. The downsides of the Okuma are its weight and somewhat rough finish. As well I think the reel would turn to powder if left near the ocean too long. However the drag is most impressive for a reel in this price range(@$170CDN)and the backplate is kind of stylie looking.
Brian Niska
 

·
JD
Joined
·
3,609 Posts
Okuma Integrety

I have a smaller O.I. reel that I use on a 6 wt rod. Being an engineer, I examined the drag mechanism very thoroughly until I understood how it worked. While it is an effective mechanism, it is not sealed. So if there is a chance you may have to dunk it in the stream for some reason, it could get sand, grit, or some other foreign matter in there that would screw things up until you could flush it out. I would also recommend staying away from salt water with these reels. Other than that, they are certainly priced attractivly, almost to the point that they could be considered disposables.:hehe: A friend of mine has the largest one on a St. Croix 14 ft rod. Has not had a good pull on it yet so we don't know how it will hold up. Not a lot of room left for backing, even with a Wind cutter line. With any of the longer belly lines, forget it. Too small for my taste.

Try to find a Redington AL or AS reel in a 12/13. (or maybe they were 13/14s. anyway, the largest they made.) They have been discontinued, but Orvis was clearing them out. hey are machined from bar stock and have sealed drags.

For lines I would go for an SA XLT Spey 8/9 or 9/10. (I am not that familiar with the Scott SAS rods) They (XLT's) are not yet available in a multi tip configuratioin but since you are a beginner, stay with the floater for now. You can always add loops and sink tips later. The XLT line will force you to learn proper technique, but the pay back is worth it. These lines will add 20ft to your cast.,,, easily, and you can mend all the line you can cast!

my $0.02 worth
JD
 

·
Junkyard Spey
Joined
·
7,112 Posts
Economical Spey Reels

wallis_matt: You might also check out the Tioga #12 and the Magnum 200. As for lines, I agree with J.D. about getting a straight floater to start. I personally like the Airflo Delta lines but that XLT is pretty hot with many much better casters than I giving it high praise. Whatever floater you chose you can always get down with the 10' Airflo Poly Tips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Another option for the under $250 range is the Lamson Velocity 4.5. I have one for my Burk 8133 and it balances very well. Sealed drag and low start-up, best reel for under $250 IMHO.
 

·
Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
Joined
·
1,771 Posts
Velocity 4.5? When did they come out with anything bigger than a V4? I would love to check them out.

Q: spool diameter?

Q: capacity?

thanks!

Juro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
reel

thanks for the feedback, I found a tioga 12 on closeout for about $120 now all I need is some line to go on it..
Matt
 

·
Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
Joined
·
1,771 Posts
FWIW, one option would be to start with a cheap DTF and a long leader until the fall rains raise the river. This will get you into a very straight-forward introduction while giving you a tool that will catch a bunch of steelhead swinging good-looking caddis patterns at the right times of day. You can probably find a nice 9wt DTF line somewhere in a flyshop clearance bin for $25.

Once you get the swing of things, you will need to determine if you are a short head, mid-size head, or x-long belly caster. I don't think anyone can rightfully tell you what you will like, this will be up to you (but they will anyway). Try them all before you decide, and you will probably change your mind over time as your casting skills develop. The DTF will keep your fly in the water and get you into some fish, which is the real reason we cast last time I checked.

Personally I like them all... DTF is no-nonsense, great learning tool; compact heads will throw any tips and the motion is short and easy; mid-sized heads are so easy to cast, great compromise; x-long tapers go the extra distance and are fully mendable like a DTF, etc. Each has it's upside and it's pitfalls - DTF won't shoot or throw sinktips very far, compact heads require lots of stripping of running line, x-long belly lines aren't as easy to master as others, etc.

We're lucky to have choices; but IMHO each person has to make their own choice based on preferences. If the benefits outweigh the pitfalls for you, the line is right for you!

Perhaps the very best thing you can do is attend a Spey Clave and try every setup you can, listen to everyone you can. Besides, it's a great time with great people!
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top