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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there such a beast? Something that give a rookie like me a guideline as to reel weight to rod length or rod weight?

Thanks
Grant
 

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Interesting question but I think the answer is 'no.'

Figuring out a rod balance weight is actually rather easy. All you need is few 1 oz lead fishing weights and a couple of 1/2 oz. From the point where your upper hand will be (balance point) just keep adding weights (think paper clips) at the center of the reel seat until you find that point. Hope that made sense.

My 'rule of the thumb' is to subtract one oz from that for backing/shooting line (You ignore the weight of the head as that's going to be out the tip-top anyway) and you've got your reel weight (or within a nudge).
 

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The speyco website has a whole page about balancing a rod with the right weight reel.

Not a chart, but some very helpful info.


Dan
 

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Cicada,
Your post is the perfect example, and a very strong argument for the local fly shop! Sometimes the best deal, even on speypages, is not the best thing for YOUR bottom-line.
If you have any idea about what you want, a seasoned flyshop guy or gal can assemble a package that is balanced and fits your needs. If you rely on folks half a continent away (or even on this site), you might not get the expertise you think you're getting. After you've got a balanced outfit and some miles under your belt, then the classifieds becomes a truly wonderful place!

Good luck!
 

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Very roughly speaking, translating two line sizes from the single-hand reel rating usually will get you in the ballpark in terms of line capacity. So if you have a reel rated for an 8/10 single-hand line, that is about right for a spey rod in 6-7-8 wt. If you have a 10/12 reel, works on a 8, 9, or 10wt rod. Shortening your backing or use a mono runner you can buy a line weight equivalent (at least), translate three sizes instead of two if you have a small reel for its rating or you want more backing.

That is only useful for capacity, weight can be quite off as many of the new saltwater-class reels are quite light and don't balance long rods. So it's wise to go through the exercise Fred gave to get a weight estimate.
 

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Don't forget a lot of this is personal preference. The only real requirement is that the line will fit and like said above using mono or gel spun backing could make it possible to use a much smaller reel. For example (due to always forgetting something) I've had to use the same reel in one day for a 6 wt switch and then swapped over to putting it on an 8 weight spey with a Skagit head. Personally I don't stress over an ounce or three, some reels make my rods more tippy in the swing and some don't.

There is so much info on here and the net in general about sweating and WAY over thinking the small stuff (IMHO) don't get caught up. Get a rod, reel, and line to match then focus on casting and most importantly fishing a run properly!
-Josh
 

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Here comes some huge generalizations:
12' 6wt- 8oz
13' 7wt- 9oz
14' 7 to 9wt-10-12oz
15' 7 to 10 wt-12-16oz

Every one of my outfits (except for one) is perfectly balanced for my style of fishing. I like the rod to balance on one finger a few inches below the top of the grip, slightly tip up, during the swing of a moderate-length cast in a moderate flow. This reduces fatigue over the course of the day and makes the rod slightly more mobile during the casting cycle.

As I said, the above list is only a starting point and lots of folks are going to chime in with their exceptions.
The point is this:
Expect that a short, light rod will let you use almost any reel that holds enough line, but as you move up the length/weight ladder you'll find yourself seeking out heavier reels. I have a 1 lb reel I use on my 10/11 Stinger and it's perfectly balanced for my taste. a 12'6" 10 wt will also ask for more weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Great advice

All sounds good My local shop has limited spey skills and the rod I wanted was only available stateside TFO 14' 6/7 will do the lead weight trick first then see if any of the reels I have will fit the bill.

Thanks for for all the tips and tricks

Grant
 

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One personal preference of mine is that I always prefer a reel on the heavier end of the spectrum than one that is too light, regardless if I'm fishing a 10'6" or 14' rod. Reels that are too light don't feel right.

Also, I'd make the observation that most of the two-handed rods I've had have a fairly wide window of reel weights that will work. So, I'm not afraid to use different weight reels on the same rod. I wouldn't say the same for the single-handers I've had, which seem to be much more picky about reel weight.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
One personal preference of mine is that I always prefer a reel on the heavier end of the spectrum than one that is too light, regardless if I'm fishing a 10'6" or 14' rod. Reels that are too light don't feel right.

Also, I'd make the observation that most of the two-handed rods I've had have a fairly wide window of reel weights that will work. So, I'm not afraid to use different weight reels on the same rod. I wouldn't say the same for the single-handers I've had, which seem to be much more picky about reel weight.

Tom
Does the extra weight help in using the lower hand? I still need to work on that portion of the cast.

Grant
 

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Here comes some huge generalizations:
12' 6wt- 8oz
13' 7wt- 9oz
14' 7 to 9wt-10-12oz
15' 7 to 10 wt-12-16oz
That's pretty close from what I have gathered over the years. These numbers maybe a bit under weight on some but the numbers will change an OZ or two or more depending on... , up or down locking seats, thickness of the reel seat, blank thickness, and material used in blank construction, grip location, the size of your hand ,,cork length , and the materials used in handle assembly just to name a few.
Always keep in mind that #30 backing will add 1 OZ per 100 Yards.

and a little tip light is good.

I went crazy answering emails with this very question. So I do have some directions on the site for getting this dialed up.

If you find a reel that is a little light do not go in the lead tape direction. It is best to just stay away from adding the lead tape to the spool if there are other locations to stick it that is not spinning...OK then.

I have received quite a few sad emails about about adding weight to the those super light saltwater reels.

Good luck.
 

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I have received quite a few sad emails about about adding weight to the those super light saltwater reels.

Good luck.

Should have told them to buy a Speyco Reel and they wouldn't have that problem. :saevilw: I use to have one and sold it. Regretted it and now I have one coming in the mail on Monday. :razz: I am not going to part with this one.

Dan
 
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