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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have any information on the origination and tying recipe for the Red Lantern fly? I was told that this steelhed fly originated in B.C., Canada.

Regards,

Richard
 

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The "things" you find out years after the fact.

Used to tie a very similar fly for winter use on the Russian River in Nor. Cal. Had no idea there already was such a beastie up and in production.

Main change that I did was add small chain bead 'eyes' to help the fly sink a bit further.

fae
 

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Red lantern is that like the "Red Light" district in Amsterdam ?

Dean river lanterns I have tried those with no success. they are now buried in the fly inventory some where, they don't get a space in the working inventory on the river until they prove them selves.
 

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Fred,

The Red Lantern (really the Red Dean River Lantern) is nothing more than a variation on a comet in the same colors that was in common use in Northern California.

Rphaler,

The fly was originated by Bob Waggoner, now deceased, of Idaho. He was also the originator of the Wag's Waker, the skater with the upside down moose wings as well, which is a good fly is sizes 8 & 10. The Dean River Laterns simply substituted the florescent plastic sheeting strips for the tinsel or floss of the original Northern California comets. They also left out the bead chain eyes; but they could just as easily be added back in if you wish. All the laterns really do is provide a brighter florescent body that appears to glow to the fly. They are very easy to tie; however, you must put silver tinsel under the body (or tie the fly on a nickel plated hook) or it will not glow as it should.

You can find the tying recipe in "Flies for Steelhead" by Allen or Trey Combs "Steelhead Fly fishing".
 

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"All the laterns really do is provide a brighter florescent body that appears to glow to the fly. They are very easy to tie; however, you must put silver tinsel under the body (or tie the fly on a nickel plated hook) or it will not glow as it should."

Right on the money with this description on how/why fly worked as well as it did on the Russian River in the Healdsburg, and up. Loved the additional post script about doing this in neon green for kings. Still have a bunch of that stuff somewhere in storrage. Will tie them up and be prepared for the spring king run on the Rogue.

Fish counts are very old now (last one was mid October) but at that time there were 11,000+ summer runs and abut 14,000 fall kings through the counters.

Out Sunday morning and hooked 5 fish in the first hour ... then dead as a door-nail for the next three. But first two fish had to be extreamly! large summer runs or very early winter fish. Lost number three-five; the first two of these blew 12# leader like it was dry spaghetti, the last I just 'crackered.'

Hooked the first fish while I was actually starting to strip the line off my reel for the first cast. Fish took 100ísh plus feet of 8/9 xlt and 15-20 yards of backing in one run. Which was probably fairly easy as I run a light drag and the rod was flat to the water when he took the fly on a dead run moving down stream.
fae
 

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Hint:

Try holographic tinsel underneath, looks to provide more of a glow to them and other patterns from what I can tell.

Yes green bodies and black hackle are a great pattern for GL kings. They just love fluorescent green for some reason.
 

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Mjyp,

U agree totally regarding the use of anytiing other than a silver underbody. Only the silver provides the proper light reflection for producing mazimum glow.

Fred,

Try the fl. green with a fl. green tail and hackle for kings, and tie it on a #6 hook.
 

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Fred,

That is correct: green on green. This combination has been very effective for a friend of mine who lives in Fortuna, CA fro use on the Eel river right in town. He caught a lot of kings last year right under the nose of gear fishers with this combination.

Another fly to give a go with kings is a fushia bunny leech tied in #4 or larger. Tie it with fushia UNI STRETCH NYLON as both body and tying thread. This fuschia bunny leech is also dynamite on chum and coho. I add a few strands of dark blue and untraviolet hot pink krystal flash to the front of the fly for some added flash; but it works well without the krystal flash. Fish it deep on a swing.
 

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FT, that sounds like something the Oregon State Game

Dept. would declare "illegal." Wild!

Vis a vis the 'tail and collar' what material(s) are you using? The flo. green on green sounds like an impossible dream. Very effective fly on the Chetco and lower Rogue is similar, but use a black chen. body with a flo. green tail and collar.

But, what the hay, who knows what gets Mr. Fish's attention. Lord only knows what they think they're looking at when they see that floating by ......
:smokin:
 

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Fred,

Fl. green calf tail (note it is neon green not chartreuse) and either saddle hackle or chinese neck hackle in fl. green ( again it is neon green, not chartreuse). I also use fl. green Danville's 6/0 flymaster tying thread on this fly.

I've had to dye my own hackle to get the color most of the time. It is very easy to dye this color with Jacquard acid dye (found at most craft shops) or Fly Dye (can be gotten from Organic Dyestuffs in 1 oz quantities, or from some shops, one of which is found in Southeast Washington). And white strung saddle hackle is easier to find and dye than white/cream Chinese necks.

You can also use fl. green (lime or chum green) braided mylar tinsel for the body.
 

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fredaevans said:
Green on green on green?
I can attest to the further effectiveness of this fly on Winter Steelhead. I didn't tie it as a "Lantern" variation, but a modified Comet. Kings do like it, too! =) Put some sort of flash in the tail, too. KF or whatever really livens it up and generally adds to the attractiveness. Besides, it's fun!

BTW, gold tinsel under fl. green plastic makes a fine caddis nymph/emerger body. Not a great shade for a typical S-H fly, but well worth trying during a hatch! (Put it on a scud hook with a black bead head, CDC beard, peacock herl head and Wood Duck antennae for a good one!)

Never had much success with the Lanterns proper, myself. Doesn't mean they don't work, they just haven't been effective for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Dean River Red Lantern Genesis

Gentlemen:

Many thanks to all who have contributed to this thread and furnished me with the references in printed form. There it was, right under my nose in Trey Combs' "Steelhead Fly Fishing" tome. Trey writes that Bob Wagoner said that Dr. Art Cohen of San Francisco discovered that using Edge Bright wrapped over silver tinsel produces the "lantern" glow instead of winding monofilament over a hot floss body that covered a tinsel body.

As an aside, I purchased the "lantern" three years ago at a fly shop on the American River in Sacramento, CA. Since then, I've had success using the fly for Steelhead, Chinooks, and at times resident Rainbow Trout on the American, Feather, Yuba, Mad, Eel, Smith, Trinity, and upper Klamath river systems. During the forthcoming December/January timeframe, I'm planning a trip to fish some of the northern CA coastal rivers (Russian, Gualala, Garcia, etc.) from Healdsburg and on up to Mendocino before I fish my favorite, the Smith.

I'm certainly appreciative that this thread has sparked some interest in this fly. As for myself, I just have a lot of confidence in using the "lantern." It has always worked for me and it's my initial offering, regardless of what others may be recommending or using at the time!

Regards,

Richard
 

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MJYP,

I am another black eztaz junkie been using that on a number of different patterns.

Black and green is a good combo.


Pastord

Been experimenting with some gold holographic tinsel under a green or olive vinyl rib, these things glow in the water, put a black extaz collar on it, they are a good to go steelhead caddis pattern, at least in the GL tribs.

Rphaler

Yes Trey Coombs talks about tinsel under silk floss also, other wise the floss turns a dark color. That was a new one on me which I started using a couple of years ago. Maybe I should give the lanterns another try, think I have some edge bright left in fly inventory.
 

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Dean River Lantern - Ed Henke

The Dean River Lantern is indeed a northern California Comet-type fly. It was actually originated in northern CA about 30+ years ago by Ed Henke, a former SF 49'er lineman, very avid steelhead and salmon fisherman and dedicated conservationist who fished the Dean and northern CA steelhead and salmon streams. When he first tied it, there was no such thing as Edgebright or Edgeglow. They were tied using strips of red plastic, cut, I think, from report covers from the stationary store.
 

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Interesting info on the orig. pattern. Pre-edgebright I used

Amnesia (sp?) fly line backing with the tins. underbody and small chain bead 'eyes.' Interesting how you can come up with something you think is "new" only to find out it's been around for 40 years.

Hal, know our bank mail system is slow, but this is beyond the pale. I could have walked the flys over to you in this amount of time.

And I think your 2,000 would deserve some sort of small celibration. When you get there, we'll set up a time where you hit send, the whole board can be on line and we all toss back a "collective"single malt!

fae
 

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Fred et al,

This kind of stuff is very common in fly tying. Tying techniques and patterns that have been around a long time get tied with a new material or a different wing or body material and they are given a new name. The fly then is "reincarnated" as the new golly gee, have to have it, wonder fly that everyone needs to use.

It would sure be nice if folks would quit this nonsense and simply say that it is the same fly as before with the addition of 'x' as a body material or 'y' as the wing.
 

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"FT" pretty much agree with you comment above;

but suspect there are very few 'original ideas' around at this time on 'new fly' patterns. Having said that, I'm still amazed at some of the things folks come with that are original, or close enough, for credit.

My first "lantern," as mentioned above was to do a take off of the comet pattern, but still different using some left over fly line backing. But new materials, new ideas come forth.
fae
 
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