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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been spey casting for four years and consider my casting ability above average. My first rods were used but good brand name. Over this past winter I decided to treat myself to a new top of the line (Brand name withheld) 7wt, average length rod. The second time out with the new rod the tip section broke just above the ferrule on the forward cast. I use a 7wt Wulff triangle taper and on that cast when it broke, the last 7 ft of head/belly was inside the tip guide.

Well, tonight I went out for the first time with the new replacement tip. After 3 hours of casting and really getting into the groove with this rod the same thing happened. This time I had the whole belly out of the tip, just barely. This time the tip broke 2 inches above the ferrule also on the forward stroke of a single spey. I do not use weighted flies.

My question and point of discussion: Is it possible that my casting style is contributing to this? None of the other rods I have used broke while learning to cast. Prior experience found that if I overloaded a rod with too much line or too heavy a line the casting was poor, not rod breakage. Isn't it unacceptable for a rod to ever break during this kind of usage? Especially for you instructors--have you ever seen this type of thing?
 

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#&%*@^# Caster
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Was the rod taped? Usually breakage above the ferrule indicates loose connections the majority of the time. Seeing you were casting for 3 hours if you were not religiously checking your ferrules this could have caused the breakage.

While taping does not always solve ferrules from coming loose it can help, especially during long casting sessions.

-sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good question. No the rod was not taped, I've never taped ferrules. The ferrule was still firmly attached after the break.

Your question also pointed out a typo in my first post. The second tip broke 6 inches above the ferrule.
 

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Eye Spey,

Just a thought...

Minimize predominant high hand power at the "D" with this particular rod ?

Give her more of a relaxed, evenly distributed two hand even push <> high hand low hand ... With slight predominant under hand power.

... This puts more of an even load to the entire rod, rather then forcing power through the tip.

Predominant high hand can shock some rods into tube collapse.

Meiz
 

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loco alto!
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It is hard to imagine any 7 wt two hander could be overloaded with a TT 7 spey line. It sounds like a series of defective rod tips to me. Bob gives good advice on how to adjust a stroke, but I don't think any rod should be breaking regularly like that, regardless of your casting style. It isn't like you loaded a 10/11 Grandspey on the thing and went for Musto.

Personally, I would return the rod, and either ask for a different model entirely, or a refund. It is unreasonable to expect your fishing enjoyment to hinge on whether or not your rod will snap under normal usage. That is unnerving and distracting, precisely what fishing is meant to counteract.
 

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SSPey said:
It is hard to imagine any 7 wt two hander could be overloaded with a TT 7 spey line. It sounds like a series of defective rod tips to me. Bob gives good advice on how to adjust a stroke, but I don't think any rod should be breaking regularly like that, regardless of your casting style. It isn't like you loaded a 10/11 Grandspey on the thing and went for Musto.

Personally, I would return the rod, and either ask for a different model entirely, or a refund. It is unreasonable to expect your fishing enjoyment to hinge on whether or not your rod will snap under normal usage. That is unnerving and distracting, precisely what fishing is meant to counteract.
SS, you beat me to it; couldn't agree with you more. I've cast dozens of rods, have ... well far too many .. and the number of rods I've actually broken over the years I could count on the fingers of one hand .. and have fingers left over.

I'm sure there ARE exceptions to this, BUT from what I've seen, it's damned rare for someone to break a rod, save for there was already a built in problem. Cracked blank, loose ferl., etc.

Now if you were Way, Steve, Ian, Simon, et. al. .. that might be a totally different game plan.:saeek:
Fred
 

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Steve <> Fred,

In short you guys are right on, and I agree that under these circumstances a breakage pattern has developed, and the mfgr. needs to look into this as a potential problem.

Eye Spey's next best delivery technique would be the Priority Poke <> USPS Priority mailing back to the mfgr. asking for some credible compensation.

...But Eye Spey did ask about perhaps his casting style as being part of the cause of his rod breakage.

So maybe this is a good time to address casting style and rod breakage.

So a couple thoughts.

I do my share of repairs and section replacements, as no doubt my rods can break too.

In fact any blank can break if put under duress loads.

<> Just as the draftsman can break the graphite within his mechanical pencil by pushing beyond the graphite's load bearing capability ... So can any graphite composite tube fail.

Over the years I've kept a data base of my blank failures via direct feed back from my anglers, always asking the circumstances as to how the rod section failed...Most all blank companies will logically do the same.

Questions like:

What was the cast? ... Did the section fail from load at the dangle or at the D, what were the lines used at the time of section failure, how deep was the wade....etc.

... Anything beyond the obvious section failure caused by the mid-air collision with a lead eyed fly, the clip of a tree branch, the trip on a slippery rock or the like found in all normal fishing conditions.

Over the years of repair, it seems that cause of section failure in the cast will occur most often at the anchor points.

Or perhaps better said: Overpowering line release from an excessive, or poorly placed anchor point.

<> And this most often at the change of direction from the dangle....

... With next most common cause of section failure being the over-power of the predominant high hand at the D to compensate for a poorly placed and/or excessive anchor.

In both cases <> Blank section failure can be caused by the casters attempt to release an excessive amount of line from surface or sub-surface tension with an overpowered stroke or lift.

At minimum; extreme power to the the excessive anchor can simply steal potential forward delivery distance and cause a shorter then desired presentation.

... At maximum it could possibly ovalize the blank wall to the point of collapse and cause section failure.

This observation is by no means meant as a disclaimer to a faulty manufactured blank section, it's meant only as an expression of compiled data to minimize this very common failure potential with any two handed rod.

As a rod builder I get asked the question of how to minimize two handed rod breakage all the time by my anglers.

My first common reply is that all fishing rods CAN, and indeed sometimes WILL break in a normal fishing enviornment ... That's a given.

But my advise to minimize breakage while casting the two handed rod: Is to always try to avoid the scenairo of putting the rod in duress with extreme lift or push power at the excessive, or poorly placed anchor point.

Rather then trying to compensate the poorly placed or excessive anchor with extreme power load to the rod...

It appears that it's always better (for both the rod and the caster) to attempt a re-position of the poorly placed anchor to a more advantagous position at the D, or gently lift excessive anchor to a minimal at the dangle.

Doing this...Will logically minimize blank failure in the normal hour by hour casting process.

As casters we all encounter these good, better, bad anchor scenairos throughout our normal casting day ... And throughout the day; some no doubt are performed much better then others.

We know when all is just right because when it is: The line will zing out there a country mile with an absolute minimal amount expended energy on the part of the caster...

...And usually this is best accomplished with a friendly equal and even power load placed onto the blank at the same time.

When all this happens just right <> It's pure poetry...};^)...!!!

Anyways I'm yaking way to much here, but like I said this could be worth a few shared thoughts by others.

Meiz
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks all

for chiming in. And Meiz for the very detailed response. I'm gonna have to read that one a few times to fully digest.

FYI, I was fishing river right, single spey with my dominant right hand on top. Somewhat unorthodox, but it forces me to use more lower hand.
 
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