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Is it necessary to tape your rod ferrules for traditional long line spey casting? Does it mater what type of ferrule, internal spigot or top over bottom overlap? Thanks, Jim
 

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taping?

the short answer is no, a thin smear of bees wax does the job, then just check the joints every now and then, I check perhaps 4 or 5 times during a days fishing, and that you would or should do even if you tape, and I do not overhead at all, all spey or roll casts.
Len
 

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Agree, Been using the wax for 30+ years fly casting, have used tape on spey rods but as long as you wax and keep checking the ferrules during the day you should be fine.

I did blow up one spey rod that was not taped but believe that was a manufacturer defect which they replaced under warranty.
 

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I know that we have addressed this issue in the past. I can see where tape may "help" keep the sections from twisting. However, I have a hard time accepting that the tape adds any significant support to the rod. Is the tape to keep the rod sections from twisting or to support the rod?

Would some of the rod manufacturers jump into this thread? If taping is so important, why isn't it included as an instruction from the rod makers?

Thanks,
David
 

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Will any old wax do? or is beeswax the best. I tape occasionally but really don't find it does anything different, still twist a bit. I agree to just keep checking often throughout the day.
 

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Taping -
I am totally sold on taping. Up until two weeks ago I wouldn't allow the stuff near my rods. I build my own rods and didn't want to cover up my work with tape. I have seen friends blow rods up that weren't taped but I was too stubborn to learn from their mistakes. Well on my trip to the Thompson this fall I decided to give the tape a shot. Wow what a difference. Yes there was still a small amount of twist but you are preventing the joint loosening up. When the two pieces are not fully home large stresses develop and that is when the ferrule fails. I thought it would be a pain to put the tape on every day but it wasn't. I kept the same tape for five days fishing and it worked fine. I would peel it back halfway and break my rod down. So from here on in I'll be using the tape.

Wax -
Be very careful putting wax on your rod. Wax and dirt go together very well and then you end up damaging your rod. Grit will get stuck in the wax. The grit will then work like sandpaper on your blank. Many people have told me to use simple candle wax and yes it worked well at first but it led to ferrule damage down the road. There are products on the market for ferrules (that are supposed to repel dirt) but I haven't tried any of them yet.
 

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Taping is ok and wax is ok but you still have to check every hour or so..

what causes a rod to break is when the ferrule comes loose.. when a rod is properly seated the sections make contact evenly aling the entire ferrule surface. when a farule becomes loose all of the force of the cast is places on two small areas thus increasing the likelyhood of breakage.. the teltale sign of a loose farrule break is when the male section breaks at a spot that is shallower than the ferrueling depth.. I have seen this happen a lot with rods that were properly taped..

the proper way to seat a tip over butt ferrule is to push them together nearly as hard as you can. don't worry the female end will not split out unless there is a manufacturers defect.. It won't split no matter how hard you push!!!!!! so push it together hard!!!

then as you are fishing check it often this is THE ONLY assurance you'll have that your parts are still tight together. Tape and wax are in my opinion offer only a false sence of security.. that's my opinion based on the repairs i have seen...
whether you tape, wax or do nothing.. make sure you check them often!!!
 

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Three weeks ago my 8 wt failed at the bottom ferrule after the third forward cast of the day. Ferrules had been taped, rod was in the hands of a master spey caster(not me!), was a year old and had been used on the practice pool a few times before actually being fished at the time of the failure. Just never know.
 

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Jack Cook
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Candle Wax

Candle Wax is better than pure waxes as it has a bit of oil in it. The oil helps it go together easier and helps it come apart when you want it to.

If you must tape nbe sure to check just the same. Rods loosen up just as much with tape as without so don't get a false sense of security from the taping.

At the end of each run you fish.....

Check your fly and the hook
Check the leader and tippet.
Check you connections.
Then move on to the next pool.
 

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Ferrule-Wax-It

All wax is not equal. Ferrule-Wax-It is a mixture of paraffin and beeswax, is available in some fly shops, costs a few dollars and is packaged as a disk about the diameter of a silver dollar, but thicker. One disk will last years.

I have used F-W-I for several years and appreciate its ability to hold the rod sections securely [I also tape], while allowing disassembly in difficult weather conditions. For example, Sunday, Nov. 6, I came off Alaska's Situk River, where the water was 34 degrees, snow falling did not melt when it landed on the river, placing rod guides under water did not remove guide ice, but the rod ferrules held securely and disassembled without heartburn. I should have put some on the reel seat assembly, as the reel was frozen to the seat.

Now I appreciate the heartiness of the Canadian, Alaskan and mid-western winter fishermen.

With all respect, I find it difficult to believe a significant number of folks are capable of regularly checking the upper ferrules of Spey rods during a day of steelhead fishing. To me taping is no different than securing one's seat belt in a car. It doesn't solve all problems, but it has to be obvious that it will increase the number of casts it takes to loosen a ferrule.
 

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Dornblaser,
Taping helps keep the rod sections together. The mechanics of ferrule failure are: first, a section will rotate out of alignment due to the torque of Spey casts, and second, taking advantage of the now loose, out of alignment ferrule, the sections separate and as roballen says the large Spey cast load is now borne by two points rather then the entire near-cylindrical area of the ferrule.

Bang!
 

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Correction:

Agree with the above, its candle wax I have been using all these years.

I am always checking the ferrule seating and alignment during the day and tend to tape when I am using sink tips. When using floating lines I do not tape.

Keep in mind here in the GLs I am not required very often to make very long casts due to the small width of the rivers, but thats another subject.
 

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Dana's method

of taping, using longitudinal tape before wrapping will make it even less likely for the rod sections to move significantly. I tape and watch for rotation. I also check my fly point, if there are some rocks close behind me, as I still pop an anchor at times and the fly jumps back and there is no point for the next grab.
 

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Jack Cook
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Well Corrected

I appreciate that my choice is words was poor. I meant to say candle wax is what I have used for many years and it has served me well, not that it is the best and only solution. Any wax product with the proper lubricant to help it lock and release will work equally well.

I agree it is difficult to check your joints during a days fishing. The other side of the coing is you are going to break rods from loose joints whether you tape ot not if you do not develop the discipline.

This is one reason I do it at the END of each piece of water. When you get to the top of a piece of water you are only thinking about fishing it and it is easier to put it off. Develop the discipline of checking everything and not only will you not break so many rods but you will also put more fish on the beach since your hooks will be sharp and you leaders in good shape.
 

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Probably depends on the rod and the fisherman

Jim Cloninger said:
Is it necessary to tape your rod ferrules for traditional long line spey casting? Does it mater what type of ferrule, internal spigot or top over bottom overlap? Thanks, Jim
None of my Sage rods require taping nor do my Meiser Rods.

I started using Burt's Bee Wax on all rods about 3 summers ago. I was on the Lower Rogue, and it got very hot that day. I had taped and not waxed my Sage 7141 and 10151. I stopped fishing mid day and removed the tape from the rods. I barely got the 7141 to come apart and the 10151 was stuck so hard that two adult males couldn't get the bottom two sections apart. I had to drive close to 500 miles on the return trip with the two sections stuck together and not in a case.

I have had Sage one handed rods stick together when it got hot, but nothing like their Spey rods and these two rods. An unknown and kind fly fisher in Gold Beach suggested that I buy a little tin of Burt's Bee Wax to put on my rods before using. I did and my 7141 came apart the next day with no problem, and I used no tape.

Since then I have used Burt's Bee Wax on the male end of my ferrules, and I have never had a problem. I check the rods after the first few casts to realign them and to firmly reseat them. My local fishing buddy and I fished some really hot days this past summer. We used the Burt's Bee Wax before hand on my Sage 5120 and 5126, my Meiser's switch rods and his one handed rods. The rods stayed together and came apart that evening with no problem


I check the first section connection on a regular basis, and I do a visual check on the line guides on the rest of the rod sections. If there is movement you can see it as the ferrules will not be in a straight line.

Taping can remove the finish around the rod sections and could lead to future damage.

However, I will try to do what Jack Cook said to do re checking the rods at the end of a run or before leaving a casting area.
 

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I tape and wax. Winston use to supply tape with thier rods. It takes 2 seconds and if you lay down the two vertical strips and then spiral over them it holds well. You still need to check between runs but I have found with tape it does take a little longer for the joints to loosen and have had many full days of fishing where the joints stayed together.

I have never owned a rod that does not loosen up over time. Sage, Meiser, CND, T&T, Guideline, Loop, TFO, amd FLO all have loosened up on me.

Taping can remove the finish around the rod sections and could lead to future damage.
I do not think that is true. I have never seen any rods damaged due to tape. If anything the tape leaves a residue which is easily removed. The 3M tape does not and is the best.

-sean
 

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Rod Tape

do not think that is true. I have never seen any rods damaged due to tape. If anything the tape leaves a residue which is easily removed. The 3M tape does not and is the best.

Actually what kind of tape are you referring to-is it a special tape from 3M and if it is ,where would I be able to buy some-I am from Abbotsford-B.C.-Canada-Thanks-

harley
 

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It's more liely that tape will leave a residue than that it will mar an epoxy finish. In that case the damage is likely cosmetic and will always be hidden beneath the tape you reapply on each outing. By the way vegetable oil will remove almost any common residue (on all surfaces not just your fly rod). Rub it in with a soft cloth for a few seconds and the residue will roll of. clean up with soap and water and your all done.
 
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