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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Noticed last p.m. that Veverka mentions the wide variety of Purple Kings, from ones with red hackle, to red floss in place of the second gold rib. I like the gold, red, purple combination--gives it a Victorian/clerical feel, at least to my eye. Sorry to be bombarding you guys w/ ties, but I'm really enjoying these old patterns.

 

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Sorry to be bombarding you guys w/ ties
And you keep hitting them outta the park. This one... walk the bases, you deserve it!:smokin:
 

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That's a real knockout! A very nice bit of tying, for sure.
 

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Very nicely tied PURPLE KING.

I personally prefer the version that uses one gold and one silver ribbing placed 180 degrees apart tied with black (or blackish-bronze) spey hackle. I prefer this one because it is in the style of the old KING series spey flies all of which had the once gold and one silver ribbing tinsel spaced 180 degrees apart.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Very nicely tied PURPLE KING.

I personally prefer the version that uses one gold and one silver ribbing placed 180 degrees apart tied with black (or blackish-bronze) spey hackle. I prefer this one because it is in the style of the old KING series spey flies all of which had the once gold and one silver ribbing tinsel spaced 180 degrees apart.
Thanks FT. So, on this old king series would one wrap be, say, medium or large flat silver tinsel, followed evenly (that is, exactly between the silver wraps) by small gold oval or flat ribbing? Counter ribbed? Just looking through Shewey this a.m., I see that there's one on p. 92 matching that description (which may or may not be the one you prefer) tied by Robert Newman. Also, it's tied using what looks like half-bronze coque or something rather than BEP. Is that what you mean when you say "spey hackle"?
 

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flytyer and debarb - jumping in here if I may.

There are lots of ribbing arrangements and the key is to keep them well spaced. Page 67 Shewey's book shows some nice classy arrangements. featherfliesandphantoms page (setting the example once again) shows the arrangement Russ describes: Two equidistant (tied in 180 out (one atop shank one bottom)) flat tinsels of the same size alternating and one oval ribbing following. The flat go first. The hackle is counter wound third in order so that the final rib locks-in the hackle. Each of the the tinsels flow in the same direction. To my eye - this is a cleaner arrangement instead of having the ribbing cross over the tinsels. But either way is clean as long as they are well spaced. Your Purple King is exempliary of that. Take a look at the Dallas fly (p96) Lady Grace (p27) or Black Dog (p21.) Those examples have more that 7 bands of tinsel, well spaced, still very classy finish due to smaller size tinsels. A Dragon's Tooth by John (p122 & p144) is on a AJ hook, size of hook and tinsel unspecified. So both can be adjusted for smaller or larger hooks.

I hope that gets to your questions.
 

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Spey hackle is simply short-hand for any hackle that is suitable for a spey or dee fly. Blue-eared Pheasant, White-eared Pheasant, Brown-eared Pheasant, schlappen, coche, Whiting Spey Hackle (not Bird Fur, which is different), bleached goose, etc.

fishOn4evr provided an excellent and comprehensive answer to you question on ribbing. I personally prefer to use medium or large oval tinsel (one gold, one silver) spaced 180 degrees apart and spaced evenly up the body. I also prefer to tie the spey hackle in at the front of the body and wrap it back toward the end of the body, then use 1st one of the ribbing tinsels (whichever one is on the bottom of the hook when I start) to counter-wrap the spey hackle all the way up the body. I do the same with the other ribbing tinsel. The has the spey hackle held down with both oval tinsel ribs and make for a very durable fly.

And if you have Blue-eared Pheasant that is a little short in the stem, simply tie on one in about 60% up the body, and the other at the head. Wrap the rear hackle first, and counter-rib with one of the tinsel ribs, put a heavy hackle plier on the ribbing end, then wrap the front hackle, counter-rib it with the rib you left hanging in the heavy hackle pliers, tie-off that rib, and then wrap the other ribbing all the way from back to front.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks FT and Fishon4--that's very helpful information. Much appreciated.

I've seen kings tied w/ all the ribs going the same way, and didn't understand how the hackle was being protected. I also didn't understand how to tie in a second BEP. I just noticed that Shewey talks about having stumbled on a way of doing it--he winds the first BEP up to the tie-in point of the second, then crosses--and locks in--the first BEP with the second. Both are locked in with the counter rib. Thanks again.
 
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