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Tubes source? Who's got e best plastic tubes out there for step tube set up? I tried CTF however their plastic scandi tubes did't work out for what I want. Who else has plastic tubes? Looking for something semi to rigid and for the smaller size. Any help appreciated! Prefer to remain in domestic USA d/t shipping.Thanks
 

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tubes

Check out www.fishmadman.com. It's a small company in Denmark with just two guys with young families. Best Tube materials I have used to date. You'll enjoy their "Riffle Hitch Tube" flies. I am using that system on tubes for bombers and they ride High!!! Besides that Jesper is a really good guy.
Again, very good tube material. Postage is the same as domestic US as I think they probably subsidize it a bit to sell here. Their flies are the best quality I have seen anywhere. They do sell tube fly tying supplies.
Loren
 

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I have had good success with HMH, ProTube and Heritage. All three are readily available as you specified.
 

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Great products and supporting this sites sponsorship: http://www.heritageanglingproducts.com/ Check out some of the step by steps and random ties here under member nohackle72 or through site links.

 

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I prefer ProTube over HMH every day of the week and prefer their cones and conedisks over all others.

I purchased a lot of tubes from Future Fly, a company based out of Denmark you might want to check out. Pretty happy so far.

If I had to choose one, it would be ProTube. Classic tubes and nano.
 

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Tubes source? Who's got e best plastic tubes out there for step tube set up? I tried CTF however their plastic scandi tubes did't work out for what I want. Who else has plastic tubes? Looking for something semi to rigid and for the smaller size. Any help appreciated! Prefer to remain in domestic USA d/t shipping.Thanks
What was it that didn't work out for you for the tubes you tried?

?poor fit
?too soft
?too brittle
?poor fit with cones etc
?not small or large enough - limited diameter range available
 

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"Euro tubes" (incl. those from Heritage Angling Products)
"Scandinavian tubes" (incl. those from CTFC)
Future Fly tubes
TubeWorx tubes
Plastic Tubes from SRFS

with the categories:
3mm outer diameter 'large' tubes
1.8mm outer diameter 'small' tubes

in plain colours, fluorescent, 'glow-in-dark' & 'glitter' tubes

are all IDENTICAL

the different companies offer differing ranges of colours, in different amounts (singly, pack of 5, pack of 10 tubes) & for different $$ amounts [excl. postage]

The different (middle-men) companies simply label & package them differently.

So, pick you favourite supplier of these tubes ;)

There are different tube fly 'systems' out there, and the above ARE different from the original Guideline 'Scandi' tubes. Eumer also supply tubes, and are again different from all the foregoing.


Mike
 

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tube materials

I thought I'd furnish some more information on the tube materials furnished by Fishmadman.

It´s a small business that specializes in tubes and tube flies for surface fishing after salmon and steelhead.

Due to the nature of their flies and the special design they have on flies like Bombers tied on tube - riffling hitch wake flies etc. - they have had their own tubes made to their own standards - so their tube is different from other suppliers

They make 3 kinds of tubes - that fit together in different ways if needed http://fishmadman.auctivacommerce.com/Tubes-for-tube-flies-C287589.aspx?sid=8375

Thin straight clear tube in thin diameters on a relatively hard tube. 1.4 - 1.8 mm. - commonly used with coneheads and various discs http://fishmadman.auctivacommerce.com/-Hard-Tube-1811-mm-1-meter-P2339490.aspx

A flexible tube for regular tube flies, wake flies and riffling hitch tube flies - doesn't have much memory so can be used with different hooks. http://fishmadman.auctivacommerce.com/Riffling-Hitch-Tube-big-32-20-mm-MEDIUM-1-meter-P2339491.aspx

They also do a hook-guard tube (soft) tubing…done in medical industry material - that will take a lot of mechanical wear and won’t sponge up water (so perfect for tube dry flies) http://fishmadman.auctivacommerce.com/Hook-Guard-Tube-2212mm-1m-P1854047.aspx

All tubing is non PVC

What I have found is that their tube material is very durable and doesn't degrade or break in cold water as I have found with others. Using another supplier I had a particular fly I had tied up that I hooked two fish with up in BC and it fell apart.......doesn't seem to happen on these.

I use the 1.8 and combine it with the hook guard. Works good for me.

I suggest you bring in a bit of their tube material to compare it with the others that have been suggested. I think the prices are the same as others.

Best
Loren
 

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This works very well for me .I was told they're the needle point protectors for an IV.OD is 1/10" length is 1 1/16 " Absolutely indestructible and NO junction tubing is needed. ID is ridged so hook will stay aligned .Protube or Canadian Tube Fly inserts will fit so you could make a smaller head. They are a throwaway item in hospitals so a friendly "save 'em for me please" will get you FREE industrial #'s that will enable you to give some away to friends
 

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Further to my post .Above the ruler shows the Protube inserted into the tube and below shows the Protube cut to length along with some HMH rigid insert tubing
 

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Brian,

I got a bunch of these 'iv protectors' from a good fishing buddy a couple of years ago, and they are exactly as you say - very good, softish, 'ribbed', and will accept the 1.8mm od inner tubes for addition of most coneheads etc. as well as accepting reasonable sized single hooks at the rear. Unfortunately, I have now exhausted my supply of these, but have many other alternatives anyway.


Mike
 

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Loren,

this Danish company certainly appear to cover most bases when it comes to tube fly tying supplies, that is, if you only want clear uncoloured tubes (as they don't show any coloured tube availability on their site pages.

They do carry, as does Flymakers from Scotland, the slightly more rigid 'hard' tubes in the 1.4 & 1.8 mm od sizes, which were originally purposed for use with lining brass bottle tubes, but also for coneheads and 'turbo' cones.

It is, perhaps, the more rigid (and thus arguably more durable) 'hard' type 1.8 mm od tubes that the OP was looking for to line his 3.0 mm outer tubes in the construction of the stepped tubes (for coneheads etc).

If that is the case, the either the Danish or Scottish companies should be contacted for the supply of the necessary tubes.


Mike
 

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Mike, web link doesn't seem to work?

"Euro tubes" (incl. those from Heritage Angling Products)
"Scandinavian tubes" (incl. those from CTFC)
Future Fly tubes
TubeWorx tubes
Plastic Tubes from SRFS

with the categories:
3mm outer diameter 'large' tubes
1.8mm outer diameter 'small' tubes

in plain colours, fluorescent, 'glow-in-dark' & 'glitter' tubes

are all IDENTICAL

the different companies offer differing ranges of colours, in different amounts (singly, pack of 5, pack of 10 tubes) & for different $$ amounts [excl. postage]

The different (middle-men) companies simply label & package them differently.

So, pick you favourite supplier of these tubes ;)

There are different tube fly 'systems' out there, and the above ARE different from the original Guideline 'Scandi' tubes. Eumer also supply tubes, and are again different from all the foregoing.


Mike
When I tied 'tubes' Eumer was the gold standard upon which all other was judged. First 'tube material' was stuff plastic air tube I purchased at a local tropical fish store. A few cents per foot, interior was copper pipe you'd build for model airplanes. He had that too.

Cutting was a hack saw blade, the 'flaring tool' a Philips head screw driver and light grit sand paper to smooth.

Owner asked me 'What do you use this stuff for?'

"Damn Boy, that's a hell of a good idea!!" :smokin:

Apparently he made the rounds of tackle stores and sold the heck out of that stuff. Welcome to the 1950's?
 

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Dr Bob hasn't came back on yet and I did spot a couple replies mentioning Pro Tube components. I guess I have a question about step tube construction. I've tried some tubing with which I had to insert an inner tube and then add extension tubing for my hook eye to nest in. My question is, why are some drawn away from the Pro Tube system? I use these components for 99% of my tube tying and find it very easy.

The only reason I had to try tubes was the concept of being able to retain the fly / materials tied to the tube even in the event of a break off. I use the jam knot for attaching the hook and in about 66% of hang ups I got my tube back less the hook. If it were not for this hope of recovering a snagged fly less the hook I don't know that I would mess with tubes. Do the rest of you use this jam knot I mentioned to secure the hooks or just tie them on and tuck the eye in the extension tubing?

Just wondering,

Ard
 

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The problem with using the jam knot, Ard, is that there has to be pre-determined 'match' between the leader you are using (and thus the loop to the hook, and the jam knot size) and the id (internal diameter) of the rear of the tube you are jamming the knot into. Secondly, inside the tube, there should be a step at the rear beyond which the jam knot cannot be pulled, otherwise, though the period of casting with your tube fly, the jam knot may creep further & further into the tube rear.

There are several other 'competing' methods of securing the hook at the rear of the tube fly, and all may be appropriate at different times, with different diameters and types of tubes, the size of hook used, and the way they are fished.

Tubes can be fished with a free-swinging hook, that is the hook itself is not secured within the rear of the tube at all; there are even plastic/silicon 'cone' like devices to add to the hook eye/shank to facilitate this true free-swinging.

The hook at the rear can be attached directly at the rear of the tube with a standard hook-eye knot eg Trilene, improved clinch etc, or on a loop on the leader. It is with the loop that the 'jam' knot appears to work best.

Between the loop knot for your hook, and the rear of the tube, you can slide onto the leader (before you tie your loop) a bead (or 2 or 3!) which has a hole in the bead smaller than your loop knot, and the bead od is larger than the id of the rear of the tube, and the bead prevents the loop knot being pulled into the rear of the tube, leaving the loop and your hook free swinging at a determined distance behind the rear of the tube - works well for short tubes with long wings!

As you mentioned, you can add junction tubing (usually softer tubing that that of the tube itself - perhaps silicone, rubber, neoprene or PVC) onto the rear of the tube, and unless you whip this onto the tube with tying thread at the time of fly construction, then there has to be a tight stretched fit between the junction tubing and the rear of the fly tube (unless you want the components to separate). As the junction tubing is usually softer & more flexible (deformable before damage) than the tube for the fly, it is also more forgiving to be able to accept and secure a wider range of hook eyes at the rear of the tube fly. Such junction tubing also is available in a myriad of colours including clear & fluo. It is usually replaceable if damaged.

The 'modern' "easy" method is to have a pre-fabricated stepped tube (eg Pro Tube) with a wider id at the rear to accept hook eyes directly, and thus do away with any and all of the above; however, the major drawback is that there is really only a narrow window of hook eye sizes which will fit snugly & securely into the rear of these stepped tubes; if you use the same small range of hooks for the rear assembly of your flies, then this may not be an issue.


Mike
 

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Fred, the Eumer auto-link probably doesn't work as, although the 'pages admin still automatically assigns a hyperlink to the word Eumer in any text we type, Eumer or the 'sponsor' webpages one would be directed to by that hyperlink is probably no longer a sponsor - or the webpage for the hyperlink is just 'dead'.

I rather suspect that many fly tying suppliers have switched allegiance to other than Eumer now ;)


Mike
 
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