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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
......Maxima. I dont know if this has already been discovered and discussed but I found a solution to the very frustrating job of tying mallard wings that will actually stay married before, during and after fishing. They look great and will keep their tent shape.
So here is what I do. When I get to the point where I am ready to tie in the wings I first tie in a piece of mono on the head of the fly. I take a piece about 4 inches long and lay it on top of the head. I then make several wraps with thread to secure in its place. I slide the mono back untill the forward tip meets up with the most forward wrap of thread. I make several more wraps over the mono that equate to the length of the head, and cement. Essentially this creates a triangular shaped head with two perfectly flat sides, at perfect angle to each other in which to anchor the fly. By doing this its prevents the rolling of the feather stems arround the head, which cause it to seperate when fished. I leave the mono long until the fly is done then I clip to just below the top edge of the wings inorder to hide the tip of mono. This is easy, fail safe and finishes great every time.
 

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Mallard wings

McSquidley, neat idea, it would be nice to see a pic. or two of the operation.
The trick to mallard wings is definitely in the shape of the head, a perfect head before mounting the wings plays in the over all finish and fishing of the fly. Right, If the butts of the wings go beyond the half way point of the head the wings will split and rotate to the underside of the fly:Eyecrazy:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, they will rotate to the underside of the fly with a conventional head, especially the wing furthest from the tier (if you are right handed tier it this would be the flies left wing). It is a very simple concept. Picture tying the wings on to a flat surface rather than a round surface. If you implenment the mono cheater you are tying to a flat surface that eliminates the wing from any rolling or migrating to the underside of the hook. This makes tying in the Left wing oh so easy and super clean- no rolling, no migrating...no frustration. I now look forward to tying the wings and let out a big, guteral.....ahhhhhhh because it works every time. When viewing the fly head on (looking straight down the shank), the head is triangular with two flat sides arriving at a 45 degree angle to the heads apex. Finished fly is a beautiful spey fly with perfect tent wings that dont splay.
Also, this cheater allows you to use more mallard material if a broad winged is desired.
 

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OK....I think I had it..now I am confused.

I need pics...nothing like a visual. I consider myself pretty intelligent but this one is just not sinking in too well.....maybe too little sleep last night is affecting my ability to visualize it.

If you cant post here can you send me some on my e-mail....thanks.

Click on my name to send me an e-mail

Cheers
Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Let me explain a different way

So, your ready to tie the wings. At this point you have a bunch of wraps arround the hook where the head will be. If your like me you already have what looks to be the head of the fly-sometimes larger than other times. Now just grab some Maxima (20ish) and lay it on top of the head parallel with the shank and sticking down throught the eye of the hook. Make several wraps arround the mono while it is in this position- still on top of the so-called head. You will now see that you have a wonderfully triangular head- a flat side on the left and a flat side on the right. Pull the mono back toward the bend untill the end of mono closest to the eye of the hook is no longer intruding on the hook eye. At this point make seral more wraps to secure and then cement. After the cement dries you are ready for the wings.:whoa:

PS- the bigger the mono the more vertical the sides will be, and, the larger the head will be as well. Just play arround with the size of mono.
 

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OK...I have done a very crude drawing in paint to see if I got it right.

Here is a pic of the fly head looking from the top down.

The yellow represents the monofilament

The blue represents the thread wraps

The green represents the butt end of the feathers as they are tied in...

Is that right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You got it.

Norseman said:
OK...I have done a very crude drawing in paint to see if I got it right.

Here is a pic of the fly head looking from the top down.

The yellow represents the monofilament

The blue represents the thread wraps

The green represents the butt end of the feathers as they are tied in...

Is that right?
Thats it. By placing the mono on top of the head and parrallel to the shank then tying it in a flat surface is then created that angles down from the top of the mono to the right and left edge of the already in place pre-head (for lack of a better term. If you do this and look vey closely at the fly now you will see this tiny flat surface to mount the wing to. Believe me it works, very well.

PS- make sure that when you are wrapping the mono in that you do more than just one or two wraps. Start at the rear of the head and wrap forward inorder to cover the length of head. This will give a surface to tie your wings.
 

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The mono.

I always used anything I could get my hands on at the bench, usually a hackle stem to get the desired shape but I can see mono being great for the job.
 

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The only thing to keep in mind when tying bronze mallard wings is to make sure you tie them in on the grey portion of the feather near the feather stem. If you do this, they will not split and will stay together until the fly falls apart.

And the easiest way to get bronze mallard spey wings to sit properly in to take a section from both a left and a right feather making sure each section is twice as wide as needed for the wing on your side of the hook. Then simply place one on top of the other, hold them over the hook at the tie down area (keeping in mind they need to be tied in at the grey roots of the feathers), tie them in with 2 or 3 turns of thread, and ipso, calipso like magic you have a well-formed and tented spey wing of bronze mallard. This is Hale's method for tying in bronze mallard and it is the fastest, easiest method I know of.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
flytyer said:
The only thing to keep in mind when tying bronze mallard wings is to make sure you tie them in on the grey portion of the feather near the feather stem. If you do this, they will not split and will stay together until the fly falls apart.

And the easiest way to get bronze mallard spey wings to sit properly in to take a section from both a left and a right feather making sure each section is twice as wide as needed for the wing on your side of the hook. Then simply place one on top of the other, hold them over the hook at the tie down area (keeping in mind they need to be tied in at the grey roots of the feathers), tie them in with 2 or 3 turns of thread, and ipso, calipso like magic you have a well-formed and tented spey wing of bronze mallard. This is Hale's method for tying in bronze mallard and it is the fastest, easiest method I know of.
If you are tying in the mallard at the grey part it is always the easiest no matter how you do. This part of the feather is the softest and most pliable part. If you do the mono cheater way it may conserve material a bit because you only need to tie in the amount needed for each side, and it also alows you to use all parts of the feather successfully rather than just cherry picking the creme de la creme out of the sweet spot on the feather. JMTCW.
 

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McSquidly
Exellent post, while I had no problems visualizing your idea, a photo for the intermediate tiers would realy cement this concept.
speydoc
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
My digital camera is out of commision right now. I would recomend you look at Norsmans digital interpretation in the above post. Good luck. PS-This little trick is a winner. I was inspecting a fly I had tied and fished over the course of a weekend and one other time. The wings are still married with no help from me.
 
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