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Discussion Starter #1
I need a new pair of wading boots and I am thinking of trying the foot tractors. Before I drop a car payment on these boots I thought I would ask for first hand experience. I have read the reviews online and even older threads on here about them. Some time has passed and I thought I would check in to see what everyones experience is like with them.
I am a 10.5 so I am wondering if I should get a 10 or 11. Lots of reviews say they stretch significantly when wet?

Any and all input is appreciated.

Regards
Brayden
 

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I don’t specifically have the foot tractor boots, but have had 3 other pairs of Patagonia wading boots. They are just fine, but other than the price there is nothing particularly superlative about them. I usually go for the nearest size UP with them, but AFTER sizing with my ridiculously thick socks that add like a full size.

The only thing special about the foot tractors are the extra beefy bars. A possible options is to just buy the (replacement) bars and install them on boots you already have or new ones you like and know fit You. Or you could get you local shoe repair guy to do it if you are DIY challenged.

I have been doing this for the last 5 years or so. You can install them on your own boots with only a drill, and a screwdriver, and inexpensive hardware you can get on amazon and many other places. That hardware is %100 sound and permanent for the life of the boots, no-fuss, and basically the same stuff as Patagonia uses. Since for an investment like that you will want to replace the bars many times over their life, installing them on other boots is barely more trouble.

Anyway, another option to get the same thing cheaper, and IMHO better. Choose the boots first, then add the bars!
 

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I got a pair this spring, and have only made it out a couple long weekends, so I can't speak to durability having onlyy six days in them to date. But they are the most comfortable and best fitting boot I've owned. I've had the last two versions of the Patagonia boots, and have been happy with the functionality and fit, if not always the durability. I much prefer the new boot. I wore Danner hiking boots for several years and loved them, so have some confidence in the wear of these.

The aluminum design is, I think, an improvement over the last version- the saw tooth- which was a huge improvement over the original straight bars. My initial experience with the aluminum is similar with all three versions- the first couple days rae almost too grabby. I'm accustomed to my feet rolling and sliding a bit, and when you're subconsciously expecting that, to have your foot grab like it does, can make wading a little odd the first couple days. I find once the edges wear a bit, there's a little less "catchy"-ness, and excellent traction.

It's big bite. I got them during the winter sale, and with accumulated gift certificates from my kids, so it took most of the sting off. But I give them high marks. I've owned Simms, Patagonia and two other brands I can't recall, and like these considerably better.
 

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I got a pair this spring, and have only made it out a couple long weekends, so I can't speak to durability having onlyy six days in them to date. But they are the most comfortable and best fitting boot I've owned. I've had the last two versions of the Patagonia boots, and have been happy with the functionality and fit, if not always the durability. I much prefer the new boot. I wore Danner hiking boots for several years and loved them, so have some confidence in the wear of these.

The aluminum design is, I think, an improvement over the last version- the saw tooth- which was a huge improvement over the original straight bars. My initial experience with the aluminum is similar with all three versions- the first couple days rae almost too grabby. I'm accustomed to my feet rolling and sliding a bit, and when you're subconsciously expecting that, to have your foot grab like it does, can make wading a little odd the first couple days. I find once the edges wear a bit, there's a little less "catchy"-ness, and excellent traction.

It's big bite. I got them during the winter sale, and with accumulated gift certificates from my kids, so it took most of the sting off. But I give them high marks. I've owned Simms, Patagonia and two other brands I can't recall, and like these considerably better.
Ah, so they have newer bars now and a nicer boot design. I have a stock of the old bars, but I even have a contingency plan to fill in the old holes and move the holes to match the new replacement bars. :Eyecrazy:

The new bars do look a bit lighter, and maybe remove a little of one of the main problems with bars, which for me is putting the ball of your foot on a smooth rock out of the water and having it balancing (or not) on a point.

Of course there is only such a thing as a “good fit” for specific individuals. I’m on the fringe of the bell curve terms of foot shape so I’m reminded of this a lot. You really have try them yourself, no one can definitively help you. Even the best size for any given individual depends to a good extent on their unique foot shape.

FWIW, if you buy them direct from Patagonia they will let you simply return them for a different size if they don’t fit. Some other outlets will let you do that as well. I assume for such a high end items Patagonia would have no problem with you replacing the boots with them if you have the receipt, but maybe the paperwork would be a little more.
 

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I wear a 10 1/2 tennis shoe and ordered size 13 and they fit great. I had size 12 in the older version and they were to snug with waders and heavy socks.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Wow really. That is an incredible size difference. The one problem about living way out in the woods is that it is really hard to just pop into a store and try things on.
 

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Patagonia is really good about doing exchanges if you get the wrong size. Especially if you buy direct from them. Buy what you think is right... if it turns out sideways, call them up and they'll exchange them for you via mail.
 

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My size 11 foot tractors are a tad tighter than other makes. The bars do wear out, but it takes a couple years. I prefer carbide studs.
 

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I have 50 + days on them and like them for the traction and they fit well as I went up a size to 12. They give you extra pair of tractors and will replace sole i.e."last pair you will own." Two negatives are they are heavy and have a heavy price but depending on how long you wear them they may be cheaper than non-resolable boots.
 

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Hmmm.... I wear between a 10.5 and and 11, depending on the shoe manufacturer, and I found these in an 11 very comfortable with a heavy wool sock. The description says order your regular shoe size. I had the benefit of sliding on a friend's pair before I ordered.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I like the fact they can be resoled. I tend to be hard on footwear.
Thank you all for the information.

Regards
Brayden
 

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What I've done with boots, granted less expensive, is buy two pair and keep the pair that fit. They've always shipped free to me and the return postage was $7 (standard rate for returns from a particular vendor). The extra $7 was well worth the peace of mind and time savings if I had to send them back one at a time.
 
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