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Discussion Starter #1
I've been struggling with a slight over rotation problem on my D loop formation the past few weeks/month and was wondering if anyone had any thoughts, tips, or tricks for battling said ailment?

When I recognize the error I'm able to make some adjustments after a few casts but my muscle memory or habit has me back rolling my shoulders and tossing the loop off 180 (nearer to myself) again. The adjustments I make are really just aligning my thumbs right and making sure the anchor and D loop are lined up right and firing dead on that line. Other than practice, practice, and more practice I was looking for something more to hold the proper technique without stopping and talking to myself like a fool out on the casting pond.

After I stop and reorganize myself the next two or three casts tend to have the forward loop torn open as well...any relation to the previous problem? Thanks.

-Chris
 

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Patterning

by practicing good technique with just the bottom section of the rod might help.
 

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Wilson,
two things come to mind, the first is that if you are practicing with the t&t, the recovery is huge compared to the winston, that it may be a lot more "kick" then you are used to. the second thing is that practicing with a dry line and a piece of yarn is too easy. i have been doing the same thing in my practicing. when i get on the niagara with all the weight it is almost impossible to over rotate. then i go back to practicing and there it is again. suddenly i'm throwing line over my shoulder. this is what i've been struggling with and i thought i would give you something to think about too. i put a 1.5" tube with no hook on to practice and it made all the difference in my anchor staying down and the loop not over rotating, especialy when just switch casting for practice. it seems like a crutch, but then i consider that i'm practicing for casting to fish so i may as well have the same rig as i would for fishing. it at least helped me to be more consistant in my stopping points. good luck.
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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Chris -

You weren't over rotating with the Salar at the clave, in fact those were some fine casts. I've seen over-rotation more commonly with change of direction single spey casts than with switch casts.

Anyway the trick I use was shown to me by Simon G. He often tells students to focus on a point on the bank behind and out to the side where the rod should point above on the stop. Then make a d-loop. If the loop curls 'round behind, then focus on a point further away and try again keeping in mind that the loop will continue on it's own momentum after the stop, so the stop point is surprisingly further out than one would think.

Another trick I use a lot is to watch the top half of the d-loop and make sure it stays cleanly in the angle of aim. When you look at a d-loop photo or in video, the top half should form a straight line from the rod tip to the wedge; and this line needs to be directly in the angle of aim toward the target.

Simons trick reinforces that the angle of the rod is much shallower than the angle of aim, surprisingly so.

Worth a try!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks lads. I'll be back on the water this weekend and will re-rig and give all a try.

Juro, interesting advice. Anything else you can give on mixing that technique with the fear of throwing a collision loop on the forward cast? Perhaps a little more body rotation to ensure the anchor lines up right? I have this perennial fear of my anchor landing parallel to me not on the proper line and blowing the forward loop. (because I've done that before too)

Thanks again.

-Chris
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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Bob-
Yes, or at least that's what I've been calling it. I used the term a lot at the Catt clave and Chris was there too so if I gave him bad vernacular I am guilty as charged ;)

Chris -
I can't provide a full explanation currently (at work) but when the line does not "turn the corner" on a change/single turn your focus to what the far end of the line is doing instead of everything else you're doing. Ease the far end, what I refer to as the "caboose" on the other end of the train, to land softly in the proper position and with your established casting skills (which are plenty as I witnessed) the rest should go well provided you don't over-rotate.

Also, if the anchor does not land to the outside of your angle of aim (path of acceleration) then don't cast. Just perry poke it back down river and try again.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Juro/all, I made it out to the pond this morning and had a few whacks while the weather holds. Right handed everything worked great. Those few little "ism's" really helped me feel the rod load and the line was a straight as could be.

Left handed it all still looks like I'm casting a pile of broken twigs but the few times I was able to really keep my concentration on the point where I wanted to form the loop/line/anchor the casts were dead on.

What I did discover is that the point of my D/V loop on the left handed cast is much closer to the water than I'd like. I find that if I rotate too much the point of the loop will "catch" the water on the forward stroke and break the cast. I think I'm also stopping the rod too vertically on the back stroke. What did Simon call it in his book, a "pig's ear".

I'll be sorting these out over the next couple of weeks. If it all persists you may see some more activity on this thread or a new one.

As usual, great advice, you guys are the best.

-Chris
 
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