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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys, I'm looking for some of your expert advice on what you would classify my rod as ( Sage 9140-4 IIIe, light brown blank). What I'm asking is, is it slow, med., progressive? Forgive me for my ignorance but I'm new to spey rods and have nothing to compare it to. I posted a few days ago about having trouble with sinktips and just wanted to know what you all thought about this rod. I had it given to me in trade for my prof. services and hadn't ever casted a spey before, I had no idea what to think about it's performance or characteristics. As said before, all my single handed rods are fast action, do you classify spey rods in the same manner---- fast rods= tight loops, greater distance? What exactly does a spey rods action equal as far as casting characteristics. I'm just wondering if my experience with fast single handers would be complimented better with some other spey rod or if I should stick with this one for steelhead fishing. Again, sorry for my ignorance.
 

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Junkyard Spey
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Hey flyjunky...

While I have never cast your model of rod I would class it as a very nice rod of medium action when lined right. I know your rod has it's own group of true believers. I think if you do not like the way your rod casts you quite possibly do not have the right line on it. The line choice/weight can have an effect on a given rods action. Since you are new to spey casting it is only natural that you might have trouble with 15' sink tips. I don't remember you telling us what line you were using in your first post, but I remember someone recommending what seemed to be a very workable line/leader combo. Please realize that none of the above is meant as criticism directed toward you. The right line and some instruction from a competent caster will be a step toward spey casting happiness. Take care, MJC



"Wild $teelhead C&R gives me a thrill, why don't we all make it the drill"
 

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SAGE 9140

I have had this rod for a few years now. I would classify this rod as a traditional spey rod. Or what most people would call a medium action rod in the one handed world. I have tried a multitude of different line combinations on this rod and have come up with two that I feel work very well when trying to cast sinktips. One is the WC in a the 8/9/10 and the other is a midspey in the 8/9. The one thing that I have found to be crucial in casting this rod is that you must slow your stroke way down and go slow compared to castion a fast action rod. Otherwise you tend to overload the rod and the casts will fall in a heap. Take your time and let the rod load properly and let it do the work for you. If you try to power this rod she will simply give up on you as it simply doesnt have the back bone to take it. I hope this helps.
 

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Pullin' Thread
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It is a slow rod (or traditional rod) with limited backbone in its butt. Fast 2-handers are the T&T's, Loop Green Series, Loomis GLX, and Meiser fast recovery. Medium action are the CND Specialist, Loop Blue Series, Loomis GL3, Heritage, and Sage Euro-action rods. Slow rods are the Sage Traditional, CND Expert and Custom, Lamiglas 12.5, 13.5, 14.5, most Orvis, and Golden West rods.

As I posted on your other thread, since you like fast-action single-hand rods, you should look into having fast-action 2-handers. The slowness of the Sage 9140-4 is going to give you fits because you have to slow down your stroke so much to not shock and thus overload the rod, and you are not used to doing this long, slow stroke with your fast single-handers.

The Sage 9140-4 was the first 2-hander I purchased some 13 or 14 years ago. I was never happy with the way it cast and after I cast a T&T and a Loomis GLX, I went out and bought both a T&T and a GLX. I haven't fished the 9140-4 since because its slow action is very frustrating to me.

I am very aware that many spey casters recommend the Sage 9140-4 as a first rod to learn how to spey cast; however, I think that you are better off getting a rod with the action that you are most comfortable with and that you like best to learn on. Afterall, you would no tell a person who likes and has been using moderately priced fast single-hand rods to get a Winston light trout rod when he decides to get a top quality single-hander. The same thing applies to 2-handers

For those who like slow rods like the light Winstron single-hand or Orvis full-flex rods, the Sage 9140-4 is a great choice. It is not a good choice for those who like GLX, T&T, and Sage XP single-hand rods.
 

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FJ,

I'll agree with Flytyer this is a slow rod. However, I also feel tht it is an excellent rod to develop your skills. You will grow in ability and knowledge as you become more proficient at casting. Then if the "brownie" is not to your liking replace it with something to your liking.

andre
 

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SAGE 9140's

It appears that there are some discrepencies in what FLYJUNKY is looking for vs the info that he is getting for information. He has one of the newer Sage 9140 rods with the IIIe blank. This is not the same as the old Sage 9140 "brownie" that most people are use to. The old 9140 "brownie" is a terribly slow rod with no stones at all. If you want a current version of this rod you would have to try the Sage VPS 9140. By spey rod standards the Sage 9140 IIIe is still a slow action rod. However FLYJUNKY has no base in which to judge spey rods only one handers. In terms of a one hander the Sage IIIe blanks would be more of a medium action rod. A slow rod would be a DS2 or the VPS series. The rod FLYJUNKY is using has a lot more power than the old 9140 brownie but is not quite up to the same level as the Euro action rods from Sage. I hope this helps
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Chrome Fever,

Thank you for your post. I was actually looking to find out what people thought of the IIIe rod, not the older version. When I was researching the archives I could only find stuff about the old version, not the one I have. Thanks to everyone for the advice.
 

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Pullin' Thread
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Chromefever,

I disagree with you on the "new" 9140-4 being a medium-action rod. In my opinion, the medium-action 2-handers are rods like the Loop Blue Series, the Sage "Euro-action", the Loomis GL3, and similar rods.

The "new" 9140-4" is still a slow rod. Yes, it has more power in ite butt the the "original brownie" and is a trifle faster than the old "brownie"; however, it doesn't have the reserve power of the CND Expert, CND Custom, Meiser moderate-slow rods, or Loop Black Series. The bottom line with the Sage 9140-4 (whether the "new" or the "green' or the old brownie" is that it is a slow rod, really more of an 8 wt than a 9 wt, and certainly not a 9/10 wt, unless you use Skagit or Scananavian heads on it.

As I said in my last post, since Flyjunky likes and fishes fast-action single-hand rods, he will need to go to a fast-action 2-hander in order to get the "feel" and action he prefers. The 9140-4 is never going to give him this fast feel.

This doesn't mean the 9140-4 is a bad rod, quite the contrary. If a person likes slow rods and is not planning to cast the long-belly lines on it, it would be a very good choice. However, if a person likes fast rods, the 9140-4 is a poor choice for him and he should look at the faster rods.
 

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I'll stand by what I said learn how to cast it, if you don't like it get something you do like. If you just want something else. Sell it and buy something like a CND expert or custom from a forum sponsor. You can always request one to provide you with a demo rod.

Where are you located?

forget it I looked at your profile and notice you are in central Oregon. Shoot me a pm and if we can get together you can sample some fast, med, and slow rods.

andre
 

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Flyjunky,
You have a fine steelhead rod whether you're a beginner or an expert. It wont do everything but what rod does? I'd recommend that you learn with it rather than being concerned about switching to another rod already. Then cast a few more and decide yourself what your preferences really are after you've developed some basic skills.
 

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loco alto!
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In my opinion, if you can ROLL CAST to your satisfaction with a fast single hander, then you probably would do well with a fast double hander.

On the other hand, if you find that roll casting is a chore with your fast single hander, then maybe a more moderate double hander is your style. Like others have said, that rod you have is a fine one. Lined properly, you are likely to get all the distance you'll ever need for Oregon steelhead.
 
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