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Discussion Starter #1
I have a used pre-ARC Scott spey rod. It has the older style epoxy coated chipped-cork top ring on the grip. If I'm guessing right, that would put it around the vintage of the Scott T series steelhead/salmon rods.

My questions are:
How does the action of this rod compare to the newer ARCs?

Are the current Rio line designations appropriate for this rod as well?

Or, what line would you recommend? Floating? Sink tips?

I am just learning to spey cast, is this model Scott still a viable rod to learn with or would I be better off with another model?

How much sinking head grain weight can I expect to cast comfortably with this rod (that is - once I become moderately proficient)?

Any info anyone can provide about this rod is appreciated. Pro or con, doesn't matter, the rod is in nearly new condition and I didn't pay that much for it, so you won't offend me with any of your comments.

To give you a little more info: I am currently living in St. Louis - the spey casting wasteland of the universe - and don't get many chances to get up to the Great Lakes to fish for steel but that is the primary area I would use this rod in. I'd like to spend as much time as I can swinging spey flies, but would also use it to nymph fish if nothing else was working. I might also use the rod for stripers in the NE.

Many thanks for your comments,
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Model #

Darn, I forgot to note the model number of the rod in question. It is a Scott G 1409/4s. It weighs 8.3 ounces, slightly lighter than the current ARC 1409.
Thanks again!
 

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I have not tried the early model Scott speys but believe they were slower than the ARC models. I would suggest you e-mail Scott and ask the question about rod action and recommended lines. Their web site is www.scottflyrod.com. I expect you will also get someone on the board that is familiar with the rod to give direct advice. I would not hesitate to practice with it to get the basic casting strokes down and would hightly recommend two videos:

Derek Brown's Spey Masterclass and the Rio International video if you do not have access to someone with experience to help you.
 

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loco alto!
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I have a vague sense that Scott made two 14' 9 wts, and that the "s" model was the slower of the pair.
 

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Loco-alto is right. Back before the ARC line, Scott produced a series of rods that were designed either for overhead or spey casting. The spey rods were designated with an "s" in the model. The rod you have is one of these.

It should be a fine rod to learn with although will be slower action than the current ARCs.
 

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1409s

The rod you speak of is about six or so years old.This is one of the rods I own and fished for about six or more years.The fly shop I purchased it from back then said it was the best all around rod on the market.The shop has a great rep for spey fishing info and yes they also sell other big names such as Sage, Winston,Loomis & Bruce and walker. I always say "what was a good rod years ago will still be a good rod today". I however have never really connected with this rod I have fished every line on the market with it and it never made me truly happy. I find the rod to [mellow] for the lack of a better word. The best line I found for the rod and me has to be the 9-10 accelorater. This rod may suit your style as many of my buddys have fell in love with my 1409s and purchased them before they stopped production. The one real plus about this rod is the furrels. I never have needed tape to keep it together. Have fun with it !
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Feedback from Scott

Thanks to all for your replys. I e-mailed Scott as well and recevied a reply. For those interested - FLYH2O, perhaps, - here is what they had to say about the rod and lines:

"The G1409/4s was designated "s" as a spey model. This rod is softer than the current ARC1409/4, more in the style of a traditional spey rod. I would recommend using a slightly lighter
line than the current Rio designation, especially if you are planning to add sink tips. I think you will find that the G1409/4s will be more pleasurable to fish with floating lines. The newer ARC models have more stiffness or power in the bottom third of the blank. "

Thanks again to you all.
 

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Speyshop's Speybum
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BROOKIE

The little Scott you talk about is a great rod.
I fished on for years untill some siver tonged:devil: talked me out of it.
The rod was exceptional for instruction and just all around work.
Just relax and let it do the job.
You will not be dissapointed

If you have trouble pm mail me.

Speybum
 

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Scott 1409/4S

Dave,

I fish with the Scott 1409/4S and have spent many hours trying different lines. I have met with some success with the Cortland and Wulff spey lines. If you would like to exchange information and ideas, please contact me at: [email protected].

Dwight
 
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