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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK.

I have until today (wisely I'm starting to think) never overstepped the bounds of just strapping on a shop bought braided monofil loop with two nail knots and coating it in aquaseal. For me this ranks as 'exciting DIY territory'. Very shameful I'm sure, but yup, I'm the kind of guy who just has to nod wisely and agree when people start talking about car engine maintenance, 'cos I haven't a clue and I really couldn't give a monkeys how my car works.

But now I want to replace my Rio Skagit 450 running line with slick shooter and have decided to go the whole way. So I searched around and found this (from Ed originally?) which sounded like a great solution:

"I strip about two inches of coating off run line, place a needle up though the center core of the running line and leave it there for a couple hours. Put a piece of 30 lbs. braided mono (about 6 inches piece) over the Slick Shooter and get it out of the way. Take the needle out of the core of the running line and put the Slick Shooter up were the needle was (Rough up the Slick Shooter before you put it in the core of the running line). Take tying thread and rap that connection, then pull the braided mono over that connection. And rap both ends with trying thread. Then I coat it with Aqua Flex (felx cement). I use the same system on backing too. NOT lost a line with that slice!"

OK. I'm sure this is easier the second time. But how the bloody hell do you get a needle an inch or two up the core of the running line?? Any tricks of the trade appreciated. Should I soak it in something? Best to use a large diameter needle or small? I'm looking forward to leaving a needle in there for a couple of hours but at my current rate of progress its gonna take that long to get the thing in!

I'm sure the next steps will require a post or two, thanks for your patience, REAL men.

And if you see black Jeep Cherokee broken down with a balding English guy next to it, stop and show me how the hood opens. Which we call a bonnet. How quaint of us.
 

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Mr. Mom
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625 Posts
You need a pin vise. Basically a screw driver handle with a small chuck that holds needles. Medium sized but LONG sewing needles work best for me. Take your time and rotate the needle back and forth as you work it in. I sometimes hold the line with a piece of rubber or leather to give me a better grip, and protect myself from slips. I have used vise grips to hold the needle, but I'm clumsy and impatient. about half the time I break the needle with vise grips. You know collapse the needle eye, break it in the middle, lots of ways to mess up...
 

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One additional tip is to dull the sharp point on the needle. Use fine emery cloth or fine stone and polish the end.

This will help prevent the needle from exiting the core before you are ready.

It actually makes the operation easier and faster.

Regards,
Fred Krow
 

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Junkyard Spey
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7,105 Posts
The pin vises work are great. I sell a small model and Aaron may have them as well. Most good tool stores also sell them.

Having said that, the method that Nooksack Mac mentions with the fly tying vise also does very well. One of the best line splicers I know uses this method.
 

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Member FRSCA
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All good but....

I got the needle in about 1.75in using the HMH tube attachment in my vise (very tricky), but I couldn't get anything I tied to the core of "the other" line to make it into the core of the first line I pressed the needle into. Seems the knot is too big to make it in. Anybody get what I mean???????

UKWill, thanks for breaking the ice, I was afraid to ask.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Pin Vice in hand (pin sure to follow soon...)

Anyone who lives in Portland and doesn't know Winks Hardware store is missing out on a goldmine of fishing applicable goodies.

I went straight off after Philster's post with a pack of needles and of course they had about 30 pin vices to choose from and the guy grabbed a micrometer to start measuring the best fit for me. About $10 bought me a Starret Pin Vice with a good super hard plastic grip which I suspect will be good for the job... It's a nicely finished tool and from looking on the web I recommend this brand. Depsite my DIY disability, Winks often comes through and I even bought a mini anvil there once for banging long shanks straight (I know there are other ways to do this, but this finished the job perfectly..)

Thanks so much for all your advice - one extra bonus is I think this will make the perfect Shank fly tying tool if I can mount it appropriately - my vice (and others I have seen) isn't ideal for this purpose (as you can't shove the shank in far enough for my satisfaction).

As for 'breaking the ice' I think its worth noting that Riveraddict and others often go to great lenghts to explain techniques and tricks of the trade in really well thought out detail, which makes a huge difference to those of us who bascially are self taught in all aspects of this game... The higher we can place that bar (by asking 'dumb' questions) the better use we can all make of the info... OK, off to play with my pin vice, and from there to the emergency room I imagine.
 

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I use beading needles, they have a nice long fine taper to the point. Regular sewing needles in comparison have a blunt point. Both will make you fingers bleed if you screw up.
Leroy.................
 

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JD
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3,648 Posts
bonnets, boots, and other nonsence

UKWill said:
And if you see black Jeep Cherokee broken down with a balding English guy next to it, stop and show me how the hood opens. Which we call a bonnet. How quaint of us.
Ah yes, you English certainly do have your own way with the language.:razz: The hood on a Jeep Grand Cherokee is opened by first pulling the latch located inside car, (cabin to you :lildevl: ) lower left side of the instrument panel. Assuming, of course, a left hand drive vehicle. Then there is a secondary or safety latch at the front of the hood. Reach under the hood and push the latch to one side.
 
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