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I recently purchased a nextcast Winter authority 575 grain line. It came with a floating tip. I Purchased it to fish 15 foot Rio Replacement tips on some of the shallower long runs of the lower eel river. I’m looking forward to a potential BC trip And was wondering if using the winter authority with the floating tip is essentially the same thing as purchasing a fall favorite line for a waking fly set up? Thoughts
 

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I don’t know the Fall Favorite, but thought I want to add versatility and took the WA in different weights for different rods. Some heads I had to adapt, but that’s no problem with NC lines.

My serious issue was with the delivered floating tips. Around 10‘ in length they all had too less weight to balance the Belly, even the lightest Belly versions. The tips were only around 3,5 Gramm (in comparison to Rio tips that’s between a #4 and a #5 tip. And I am one who likes light tips, hating front heavy lines.
For surface/subsurface fishing I had to use Rio tips in #7 to #8, 10‘ and 15‘, depending on rod-line pairing, to balance things out. But the NC floating tips were absolutely useless for me.

One would have to measure and weight the 10‘ tip section of the FF to compare.
But nevertheless I would prefer the WA for it’s versatility, for both, adaption to a given rod with different tip weights for best casting results and also different sinking density for fishing.

No mistake at all. I would only try different floating tips for your intended approach.

Good luck!
 

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Nextcast WA 540gr
Airflo Rage Compact 540gr
Airflo Scandi Compact 540 gr
Yes, and in fact you have identified my preferred lines, thought I also enjoy in the larger rods, the Guideline 3D+:

1. I use NextCast WA for my Meiser 5 and 7 wet travel. Trout, Coastal Trout and Steelhead. I will use NextCast WA and the Guideline 3D+
... * https://raspberryfisher.wordpress.com/2017/07/23/meiser-13668cx-6-and-tips/
... * https://raspberryfisher.wordpress.com/2017/07/03/travel-spey-rods-and-more/

2. I use the Rage or the Switch Integrated on my fiberglass switch. Close in fishing for trout.
... * https://raspberryfisher.wordpress.com/2019/06/16/james-green-10-7wt-update/
... * https://raspberryfisher.wordpress.com/2018/12/03/switch-lines-my-survey/

3. I use the Short Scandi for my ACR 1173 and small wet flies.

In summary, I change lines to the rod and intent on how I want to fish it.
 

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....
Nextcast WA 540gr
Airflo Rage Compact 540gr
Airflo Scandi Compact 540 gr
The chart is somewhat misleading in regards to head length. The Rage would be shortest followed by the Scandi Compact. The longest would be the Nextcast WA.

I believe it is helpful to think of the Nextcast FF and WA heads as long Scandi heads. The FF45 and WA 45 heads are on average somewhere close to 45 feet long. These are nice casting heads that perform well close to obstructions.


For chasing coldwater and/or high, dirty water steelhead in many parts of BC, a Skagit style head would deliver T-8 to T14 tips along with larger, perhaps weighted flies with far less effort than a sinking tip-equipped Nextcast WA head.
 

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Here is an issue with Nextcast lines, which I think are great lines: their weight designation. I bought a WA 45 line with a floating tip, and for a year I struggled casting it. I happened to buy a grain scale so I weighed the line's head, without the tip. The line was much lighter than the weight it was listed at. When I weighed the tip I saw that the weight of the head and the tip matched the online weight listing.

I always read that when matching a line weight to a rod the weight of the tip (A Mow tip, for example) doesn't count.

I pointed this out to Simon, but he didn't seem concern.

I still use the WA line, but on a lighter rod.

Randy
 

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Here is an issue with Nextcast lines, which I think are great lines: their weight designation. I bought a WA 45 line with a floating tip, and for a year I struggled casting it. I happened to buy a grain scale so I weighed the line's head, without the tip. The line was much lighter than the weight it was listed at. When I weighed the tip I saw that the weight of the head and the tip matched the online weight listing.

I always read that when matching a line weight to a rod the weight of the tip (A Mow tip, for example) doesn't count.

I pointed this out to Simon, but he didn't seem concern.

I still use the WA line, but on a lighter rod.

Randy
Randy,
The weight of a tip does matter. Of course it does.

I know "skagit casters" will tell you the weight of the tip doesn't add to the "load" because it is in the water. But then they'll also contradict themselves and tell you it is a water-loading casting style.

But anyway, MOW tips come in light, medium, heavy and extra heavy for the very reason that one is able to match [the head and the tip] together to achieve a well balanced system.
 

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The Winter Authority (WA) is not a Skagit line. Instead think of it as a Fall Favorite (FF) cut for tips.

Skagit lines generally don't count the tip for sizing purposes, this is standard across the industry, especially for line recommendations from line and rod manufacturers. But not all interchangeable tip lines are Skagits. Those that aren't, like the WA, include the tip in their grain number size.
 

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Here is an issue with Nextcast lines, which I think are great lines: their weight designation. I bought a WA 45 line with a floating tip, and for a year I struggled casting it. I happened to buy a grain scale so I weighed the line's head, without the tip. The line was much lighter than the weight it was listed at. When I weighed the tip I saw that the weight of the head and the tip matched the online weight listing.

I always read that when matching a line weight to a rod the weight of the tip (A Mow tip, for example) doesn't count.

I pointed this out to Simon, but he didn't seem concern.

I still use the WA line, but on a lighter rod.

Randy
Also, the WA are a multi-tip line in the sense that the floating section can be swaped for a sink-tip of variable sink rates that is of equal weight to the floating tip section.

15 DC Tips that I've cast are between 70 and 120 grain. In my experience, 120 grain ( the weight of the average sink tip or better still : the difference between a short, a mid and a long belly ) isn't enough discrepancy in grain-weight that a line can not cast on a given rod.
 

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The Winter Authority (WA) is not a Skagit line. Instead think of it as a Fall Favorite (FF) cut for tips.

Skagit lines generally don't count the tip for sizing purposes, this is standard across the industry, especially for line recommendations from line and rod manufacturers. But not all interchangeable tip lines are Skagits. Those that aren't, like the WA, include the tip in their grain number size.
This.

That is how NC looks at it, and wants its customers to look at it, even if there are some very small differences in the tapers and lengths between the FF and a WA with a floating tip. It true that they have confused the crap out of people, especially as they have a whole other line of heads designed to take a tip, that are honestly not super different in form to the WA heads , where they don’t come with tips and the listed weight is of the head without a tip, like a skagit head. *sigh*. Probably a simple declaration on the lable, front and center, would neatly resolve the confusion, but if wishes were fishes .... :razz:
 
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