Spey Pages banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Patrick Clearey
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to find a good Salar trip for July in Newfoundland or Labrador. Been doing my research, and there is an abundance of guides out there. I have hunted Newfoundland but never fished there. I have developed some first impressions from my web search efforts which I acknowledge may be far from the mark.

It seems that some of Labrador's rivers have a higher percentage of salmon versus grilse in their runs.......thus Labrador fishing is a bit pricier?
Have watched quite a few of "The New fly fisher" videos. Newfoundland seems more affordable,but it seems like some (not all) Newfoundland rivers have runs with a high percentage of grilse.

I would like to fish a river with at least the chance of encountering adult salmon. Would like to use the two handed rod some, so no small rivers. Have sent some info request out but responses have been slow coming.
If any knowledgable person is willing to direct me towards a particular river or outfitter, that would be appreciated.

Everyone would rather tangle with an adult fish as opposed to a grilse. But a river with grilse that rise to a bug consistently and you stand a fair chance of hooking a salmon or two during a weeks fishing, I would not urn my nose up to that.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Humber River

I have limited experience with fishing NFLD. I was only able to fish the Lower Humber, late in the season, which is when their big fish run.(or as so I was told)

The fish I saw and the one I landed were all adults. The fish I saw were much bigger than the one I landed (12lb ish). I fished out of Steadybrook. The water is big there, and would definitely fish well with a spey rod.

Even if you are to fish another river for the majority, you can always try a half day on the Lower Humber the day you arrive or leave, as it is just around the corner from Deer Lake.

Good luck, and enjoy the NFLD hospitality.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
'No experience in Newfoundland but limited experience in Labrador based on five trips to Flowers River. Based on five trips, 75% grilse and 90% of fish on drys, including fish of 44" and 40" (both on dries). On a given trip (one week), it is reasonable to expect that you will fish over multiple fish of 15 to 18#s and will see bigger fish. 'Saw well over 300 fish in August 2014 but only landed 21 (to net - this doesn't count long/short-line releases). I've risen ~ 100 fish to dries on two of the five trips.

Of course, your mileage will vary - some folks come away with a few fish and love it, others get angry. The latter bunch really need to bring biscuits from Colorado.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
365 Posts
Labrador!!!

The biggest difference in the cost for Labrador outfitters is the enormous cost to fly in provisions and sports vs the Island rivers which are mainly located within road or easy boat access.
That said, there are great opportunities on the Island for Atlantics, but timing is everything. If you turn up a week early (this goes for Labrador as well), you will fish over rocks.
Many of the Labrador rivers have very remote access, and this keeps the numbers of Locals down or extinct. This means a lot, as the custom for Newfoundlanders is to perch on a rock and not rotate through a pool. It's changing with the newer anglers as many of them are true sport fishers, but you cannot keep them from the rivers of their home province.
I've fished 3 Labrador rivers almost every year since 1994 and can provide some intimate details, but it's probably best to speak on the telephone.
If you are interested, just send me a PM with your number and best time to speak, and I can give you a call.

Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,027 Posts
The biggest difference in the cost for Labrador outfitters is the enormous cost to fly in provisions and sports vs the Island rivers which are mainly located within road or easy boat access.
That said, there are great opportunities on the Island for Atlantics, but timing is everything. If you turn up a week early (this goes for Labrador as well), you will fish over rocks.
Many of the Labrador rivers have very remote access, and this keeps the numbers of Locals down or extinct. This means a lot, as the custom for Newfoundlanders is to perch on a rock and not rotate through a pool. It's changing with the newer anglers as many of them are true sport fishers, but you cannot keep them from the rivers of their home province.
I've fished 3 Labrador rivers almost every year since 1994 and can provide some intimate details, but it's probably best to speak on the telephone.
If you are interested, just send me a PM with your number and best time to speak, and I can give you a call.

Chris
Good Man Chris, Good Man.

Have done this "God only knows" how many times with folks headed to the Rogue River. I have 'Zero Problem' telling folks exactly what's going on ... and where, right down to what 'rock to stand on.' Only thing I can't promise is .... are the fish there on that day?

Fred Evans
 

·
Internet Scientist
Joined
·
1,302 Posts
Well, if your into hunting waterfowl, I'd go with the labrador. But if you're hanging out in the mountains a lot and need a sturdy pack/companion dog than a newfoundland might be the ticket.

What?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
805 Posts
I went to Newfoundland for my honeymoon a couple of years ago. Had a great time at the Marble Inn on the Humber River. Had a fantastic guide named John. Great rooms and the food was amazing. I would give them a call and let them know what you want to do and if it was possible they will make it happen.

Brayden
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
correct me if i'm wrong but weren't the gaspe and newfie salmon runs absolutely dire this year ?

thats what i've read online anyway.

like Ireland and parts of Scotland, the runs just fell off a cliff this year.

Labrador and surprisingly NE England (R Tyne & R Wear) had exceptional years though.

its worth doing your research well with salmon fishing otherwise you can bust out despite big $$$$ - like on the Miramchi this summer where the run was 50% of last year.

“The 2014 salmon season was not a good one,” said Bill Taylor, president of the Atlantic Salmon Federation.

“Runs were down all over Eastern Canada. In fact, they were down throughout most of the North Atlantic – Ireland, Scotland, England, Wales, Norway, Iceland. The only areas that fared well were the far north, as in Sweden, Russia. We see the same thing in Canada – the further north you went in Canada, the better the salmon returns. So New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, the Gaspé of Quebec, even the north shore (of) Quebec did not do very well. Salmon runs were down 30 to 50 per cent on average. Northern Newfoundland, Labrador, Ungava Bay did better than other areas of Canada, but still not good in comparison to their usual returns.

“So there is very serious concern here in New Brunswick for the future of the species, the survival of the Atlantic salmon.”
i had plans for the Restigouche and Matapedia myself in 2015 but i nixed it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
331 Posts
It's hard to know what next year will be like.
All of the Gaspe rivers I fished had terrible returns in 2014, some direly so. A few I didn't fish like the Cascapedia had pretty decent returns considering the circumstances. Generally, the number of MSW fish coming back was severely decreased. However, there were a lot of grilse in many rivers, which normally is a positive predictor of a good 2SW fish returns for 2015. Flip that around though and note that there were a ton of stunted grilse (like REALLY small) in most Canadian rivers last year, suggesting a lack of nearshore food. Netting of MSW fish is also expanding, and it seems like a lot of the Gaspe populations are being hit by the nets (I've been seeing a lot of net-marked fish the last couple of seasons FWIW). Flip it around again and note that few seemed to expect the pleasant surprise that the banner year of 2011 was.

My point is that you can go bonkers trying to predict what is going to happen any given year. :Eyecrazy:

I'm going for my usually 2 weeks of early season Gaspe fishing, and will take it from there depending on how things look.


correct me if i'm wrong but weren't the gaspe and newfie salmon runs absolutely dire this year ?

thats what i've read online anyway.

like Ireland and parts of Scotland, the runs just fell off a cliff this year.

Labrador and surprisingly NE England (R Tyne & R Wear) had exceptional years though.

its worth doing your research well with salmon fishing otherwise you can bust out despite big $$$$ - like on the Miramchi this summer where the run was 50% of last year.



i had plans for the Restigouche and Matapedia myself in 2015 but i nixed it.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top