Spey Pages banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Compulsive water gazer
Joined
·
68 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi - I've been lurking for a few weeks, reading posts, learning, but also now have some questions> SO here they are.. (if this is not appropriate for this forum please direct me to the right place).

First - TWo-handed rod actions - I'm thinking of building a two-handed rod with enough backbone for fighting strong fish (fresh kings, coho, steelhead). Does that mean I'm looking for a fast taper blank? A heavy action blank? Seems I would want to avoid a medium or 'spey' action designation on a blank because the rod would bend to the midsection and hence a 13' rod would only offer 6-7' of lever arm for fighting the fish.....but then... such a rod would be more difficult to spey cast... is that right that there is a tradeoff between good spey action and fish-fighting stiffness?

Second - dead of winter steelheading...when the air is in the 20s and the water is 34 degrees (e.g. Salmon River NY right about now), do you still use spey flies and present them on a swing to the fish? OR do you adopt to some other technique that still allows you some of the fun of fishing a long rod? (eg small stoneflies deaddrifted on very light leader?) Or do you just punt and use a spinning outfit until it gets warmer again? I'm just thinking that fishing with a trad flyline would result in wet and therefore cold fingers before very long.. But most on this board seemt o be somewhat fanatical about spey/two-handed rods, and so must have solved this someway or another...

THanks in advance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,042 Posts
Welcome SteelieStudent,

As a general rule for powerful beasties like chinook you want to stick to a shorter powerful rod. Maybe Juro will chime in, as I think his new Atlantis will make an awesome chinook rod. Riveraddict may also be of great help here as he lives to tame the mighty chinook on the fly!

As for techniques for GL "dead of winter" fishing maybe you should post on the Great Lakes Forum - just above the Speyclave.
 
J

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I have been fishing the GL tribs for more years than I really like to admit, and roughly half of those have been with a spey rod. We swing spey flies and other traditional wets all winter long. We probably don't catch as many fish as the guys who are indie fishing, but I think we enjoy each fish we do catch all the more. The key is to get your fly within a fish's depth of the bottom and to swing it absolutely as slow as possible. Most of us use rods between twelve and fourteen feet for steelhead. Believe me, the action of the rod has more to do with casting than it does with fighting a fish. Though how you fight the fish may vary somewhat depending upon the rod action, almost any speyrod of seven weight or more is going to land most of the GL steelhead you'll hook. People sometimes use rods that are quite a bit heavier than that, but it's due more to the tips or heads they are using, or perhaps the size and weight of the fly. You can avoid the cold fingers (and ice in the guides) by using a longer bellied line this time of year. Stripping line in is what causes the cold, wet fingers, and is also what causes ice in the guides. Using a Mid-Spey, or Air Flo Long Delta or Delta Traditional, this time of year eliminates most of the stripping. I also carry several pairs of gloves and use Stanley's Ice Off Paste by Loon Products to further minimize those problems. It's a terrific time of year to be fishing as most of the lowlifes that are more snaggers than fishermen are off doing something else.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top