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Discussion Starter #1
Good day All..

New to tying flies, Kindly would like to welcome any advice or suggestions.
looking to learn a few patterns for steelies. Sculpins, Intruders, purple egg leeches etc..

Is there any advice as far as a good book, web site, vid or thread on here i should checkout?

It would be nice to have a template for each style to work from to get the basics, that i could reference off of.. tying dumbells on, finishing a fly etc..

Thanks for any pointers..
 

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seaterspey
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Fly tyers benchside reference is a awesome book that covers everything you need to know about learning the skills of tying.

PM me and I will send you mine I have had it for years and it needs a new home.

KC
 

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Davie McPhail videos on youtube...

Davie McPhail has a wide range of patterns tied on excellent videos on his own channel for youtube. He has an excellent teaching style and some great hints. My daughter says that his lovely Scottish accent gives her the sighs...
 

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My Suggestions

For a DVD, I would highly recommend Dec Hogan and Marty Howard's "Steelhead Flies - Tying the Classics." They really teach the techniques for tying quality flies. They start with basic flies and move onto more challenging flies. If you tie all the flies in the DVD, you'll be a master. For a book, I would recommend "Steelhead Flies" by John Shewey. John really teaches you how to tie presentation quality flies. Both are a constant reference for me.

Mark
 

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Something that's been helpful for me is to buy some of the flies I'm looking to tie. I just buy 1 of a pattern and then I use it as a template. I don't necessarily focus on copying the fly to the "t" but just getting. A feel for the proportions and stuff like that. It's really helped my tying.
 

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Pullin' Thread
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The Fly Tier's Benchside Reference is worth its weight in gold. The two authors did fly tyers a great service by putting this tome together. You should take Borderfly up on his offer to send you his copy.

Several other things to keep in mind when starting to tie fliues:

1) Don't buy a "fly tying kit", they are generally a waste of money.

2) Buy the best vise and scissors you can afford. This doesn't mean you have to go right out and buy Titanium scissors (you don't really need them) or a $350.00+ vise (you don't need to). It does mean you should buy good tying tools, which includes a vise that holds hook well and that has decent quality jaws that will last for years, cheap import vises don't have either of these qualities. Griffin has a tying tool set that comes complete with a quality vise the sells for around $85.00 give or take a few dollars. This set has quality tying tools (not just the vise) and is excellent quality. I can't recommend it highly enough.

3) Start with simple flies. Flies such as Woolly Worms, Woolley Buggers, simple hackle of "spider-style" flies (think Grizzly Hackle with black, orange, red, purple bodies with a Grizzly tail or no tail, or Brown hackle with black, orange, red, yellow bodies, or purple hackle and either purple or red tail with purple, blue, black, fl. green, hot pink, or orange bodies). These styles of fly are easy to learn and master, are effective, and can be tied in any color or combination of colors you wish and in any size you want right up to #2/0 or larger. Leave flies like Spey and Dee flies, flies with spun deer hair, Intruders, etc. alone until you have tied a year or so, or have tied around an hundred dozen flies. Otherwise, you will be frustrated.

4) Only buy the materials and hooks to tie one or two flies, and get good quality Chinese Rooster Neck, Whiting Amercian Rooster Hackle, or similar genetic necks to tie with in one or at most two colors to start. I recommend starting with one in Grizzly, and then get one in Black followed by Purple. Bodies can be easily made from chenille in black, hot orange, hot pink, purple, red, and yellow to start. Add peacock herl bodies after you have tied 5-6 dozen flies.

5) Buy good hooks. Never buy hooks on the basis of their price is lower. Always buy good quality hooks. Tiempco, Daiichi, Targus, Partridge, Gamagatsu are all very high quality hooks. The hook is the foundation of the fly, so never scrimp on their quality.

6) Start learning to tie with 70 denier thread. Danville Flymaster, Uni 8/0, or similar. Yes, you will break it at times, but you will learn good thread technique and control a lot faster with this size thread. Don't pay attention to all the folks and/or articles/books out there that tell beginning tyers to use 3/0 (140 denier thread) because doing so will actually slow down how quickly you learn thread control. Plus the heavier thread creates a lot more bulk. Buy black and red thread, you really don't need other colors until later.

7) Avoid tying flies with wings until you have tied 3 or so dozen flies. You don't need wings on a fly for it to catch fish, including steelhead and salmon, so why complicate your learning.

8) Never sit down and tie only one or two flies before moving on to a different pattern. Always, always, always tie at least 6 (and preferably 12) of the same fly pattern and size before moving to another fly pattern or size. This sounds like a lot of flies, but it really isn't. But it does have the advantage of helping you learn good technique and proportions far more quickly than if you constantly change the fly pattern after a fly or two because your goal will be to have the last one of a dozen look the same as the first one. And tying 6 or a dozen of the same fly of the same size is the best way to develop the skills to do so. And you then have the added advantage of never having to worry about running out of flies, which means you will not be afraid to toss your fly into fishy looking areas just because you might lose it.

9) HAVE FUN!
 

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Matt Arciaga
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Excellent advice so far from Flytyer! Yay on 3/0 thread till you learn your thread tension control.

Cheers
 

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2 things mentioned above that I did not do and can't stress the importance enough..
1. Thread size, thread control is one of the most important things to master and starting thick will not help you in the future.
2. Tie 6-12 of each pattern at a time, it will teach you disciple and help you master the small techniques.

I would also recommend getting a bank account that your wife doesn't know about! Haha
 

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Another Equally as important

The base of your fly will hold how uniform it is... Not so important with non floss but tinsel/floss imperitive, can use unistreatch t to form a nice foundation, without a great foundation the fly will not look right.. Not so important in fishing flies..

Also you can not tie out a mistake....

Also securing steps does not mean more wraps proper location of wraps,proper pressure on the thread and a little crazy glue goes a long way especially with hairwings
 
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