Spey Pages banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I'm new to the Spey method of flyfishing. I'm interested in getting feedback on what weight and size a good first Spey rod would be. I thought Spey fishing was with heavy weight rods, but obviosly that isn't true since many people have 7/8 weight Spey rods. (I have an 8-weight single-hand Sage, and wonder why I would buy an 8-weight Spey.) Do most of you fish with heavy (such as 10/11) rods, or smaller sizes? I'm a rank beginner and all feedback is much appreciated. Thx, ~J
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,027 Posts
Hi Jim; from one point of perspective.

Pretty 'tough' to equate a single hander to a 2 hander in the same rod/line wt. What rod length/wt you choose has a lot to do with the type of water (width, depth, etc.) that you fish.

If you have to get "one" rod, I'd recommend an 8/9 14' stick. Enough latitude in line wt for larger water as well as narrower stream flows. The 'Euro' rods also allow you to handle tips/sinking leaders with ease. The 8/9's can handle one heck of a large fish and flys up to (my experience) 1/0 or 2/0 done on a 'slim' (not heavily wted) configuration.

I've got three rods in the 10-11 wt and really only use them for the spring King Salmon run here on the upper Rogue. Otherwise, with little exception, they're overkill. And swinging a 15-18 foot 10-11 will give you a he.. of a workout. 9wt's, and down, you can cast all day.
fae
 

·
loco alto!
Joined
·
2,983 Posts
if you can make the long drive to Portland and the Sandy Spey clave, your questions will be immediately answered. Lots of rod and friendly people willing to show how and let you cast 'em yourself
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Fellas,

Thanks so much for your thoughts, this info was very helpful.

Fred, I especially appreciate your comments as the Rogue and Applegate are my home waters. I imagine Speying mainly for steelhead in the upper Rogue. It is hard work using my 8-weight single-hand rod for fall/winter steelhead when there is a lot of water in the river.

~ Jim
 

·
Pullin' Thread
Joined
·
4,694 Posts
The big rods are used nearly exclesively for winter fish and large flies. I use my 16 foot T&T only from November to May for winter fish unless I go up to the Thompson and then it goes up there with me as well.

The rod I use the rest of the time is a fast 8/9 weight 2-hander in either 13 foot or 15 foot. And that depends on whether I am planning on casting 80+ feet or not. If it is going to be an over 80 foot day, I use the 15 footer, uner 80 feet, I use the 13 footer.

Avoid the slower rods because they will allow you to develop poor spey casting habits. Likewise, use one the mid length belly lines (MidSpey, Long Delta, etc.) that are 65 to 70 foot belly lines. They help you develop better casting technique from the beginning and are far nicer fishing tools than the short belly lines (Windcutter for instance) of 55 or less foot belly.

Why use a 2-hander when you already own an 8 weight single-hand rod? simply, command of the water and ease of casting when the brush is next to you. Do you need to have one to effectively fish for steelhead, nope. Does one help you to fish better and more effortlessly, without question.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,095 Posts
jimretz

You probably need two rods if you want to fish year round.

The Sage 7141 with the Mid Spey 7/8 and tips will handle just about any fish and any water in N. Kali and S. Oregon except the the heavy flow winter months and the bigger fish in the winter. Now that Rio has a GS for the 7/8 weights, the 7141 should be able to rocket out casts with the new GS 7/8.

The Sage 9141 should be great for the winter heavy flows and should handle most fish except the really big kings.

You need to contact Fred, meet him on the river and try one of his two hundred rods on the river. I hear that a good bottle of double malted Scotch and a lunch for him is payment.

He has a Charity Clave coming up this spring, and you can try the rods at his Charity Clave.

Stick with the European actions for the rivers you will be fishing. Buy the MidSpeys as your learning and fishing lines. If you get into a real windy situation, just remove tip two of the Mid Spey lines with tips and attach the various tips to the main body. That way it becomes a great Wind Cutter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,027 Posts
Jim,

"You need to contact Fred, meet him on the river and try one of his two hundred rods on the river. I hear that a good bottle of double malted Scotch and a lunch for him is payment."

Couple of corrections: That's 'single malt," only 10 spey rods and lunch is usually Taco Bell or a Subway sandwich. :devil:

I note that you're in Northern Calif. so if you want to make a weekend trip to the Rogue (ah, gee life if tough!) more than happy to have you try several rod/line combo's. Choosing a rod isn't rocket science ... but it's the actual working on moving water that seperates the equipment ... and what works best for you.

I've got several rods (usually at least three spey in the car when I go fishing) that I'll bring on a given outing. Idea being that each is rigged differently so I don't have to screw around re-rigging a rod over a given run of water. Many runs (due to our low/clear water conditions) can be fished with a straight dry line and long leader, others are faster/deeper and work well with a sinking leader rig. Others require gonzo casts with 15' Sage 9wt or a 10 wt with a 9wt type VI sinking tip to effectively cover the run.

If you'd like to do a 'mini-clinic' let me know. The Charity Clinic would be the best of all worlds but we're at our max. registration already. Good news is the best "winter" fishing period 'peaks' Mid March through Mid April with about 25% of the run during that period. Lots of fish in the river already so ....
:smokin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
I would add one other comment to someone considering getting into spey rodding. There is something addicting about the long rod. Yes, once technique is reasonable good it is a more efficient and less tiring way to fish. The fly is in the water more than with the single handed rod, but beyond that it is just.....can't find the right words but super fun will have to do. I used the single handed rod for 40 years before taking up the spey two years ago and it is like I felt when I first started as a kid. Don't get one if you don't want to get addicted.

I agree with the comments about lines longer bellied than the short bellied ones. I started with the Windcutter and would start with the mid-spey if I had to do it over again.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top