Spey Pages banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm sure you guys get a lot of posts like this, so feel free to stop reading here. :chuckle:

Yesterday I got a chance to cast a couple two-handed rods, and I was intrigued by all the "wierd" casts I saw others making. So, I dug in on the internet and found this wonderful website on spey casting and tackle. I think I've read just about everything on it, and thought I would turn to you guys for some advice. After just a day, I'm hooked and am looking to get a rod and line for summer and winter steelhead in the northwest, if there is such a rod that can "do it all."

I've never fished with a two-handed rod, and have absolutely no experience with steelhead and salmon, but I think I'm ready to try something new, and seeing those guys casting 14 footers got my heart racing. I would consider myself a decent overhead caster, (I can double-haul out to 90 or 100 feet without much trouble on a calm day) and have been flyfishing for years. I'm mostly a dry-fly man, and have always preferred short, medium action rods on small streams, so this sort of fishing is a huge departure for me. I do have some experience with heavier line weights. (bonefishing mostly)

Anyway, I was hoping to get some advice on a rod, and maybe a line to go with it. I can't break the bank on this one, so I was hoping I could find a rod in the 14ft 8-10wt range that retails for under $500. The problem is, no fly shops in my area (Boulder, CO) sell two-handed rods, so I really don't have a chance to get my hands on them all and try them out. Even if I did, my casting skills are so pathetic that I don't think I could tell a good rod from a bad one.

I read all the rod reviews on the site and found them very helpful, and I was hoping that some of you guys might make some general recommendations on rods that fit my price range. Also, is an 8-9wt rod suitable for steelhead and maybe light salmon in the Pacific Northwest and BC? Should I be considering a lighter rod?

Anyway, thanks for reading my rambling post.

Jordan
Boulder, CO

P.S. If any of you know a casting instructor in my area, I'd love to get some first-hand instruction. I ordered Simon G's book, but nothing takes the place of a live teacher. I checked the FFF website for instructors in my area, but my state has only one, and he is on the other side of the mountains. I fear that for now, this is something I'm going to have to try to pick up on my own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
646 Posts
Jordan,
Welcome to the club of spey addicts!

You will not find a better site with more comprehensive information and a better group of guys willing to help.

My recommendation is that you attend one of the many spey claves (Clearwater, Sandy etc.) and get your hands on as many combinations as possible. You'll also be able to get lots of hands on experience with guys willing to help.

IF I had it all over again I would buy a balanced combination and then spend a thousand bucks on casting lessons. IF I had done this originally I would be five thousand bucks ahead and ten times the caster.

For rod combinations and all of your spey needs you will find no finer spey shop than the Red Shed Fly Shop (www.redshedflyshop.com) and no finer guy than Mike Cummins. Truly the best shop in the business. He will be able to set you up with a quality balanced outfit and in fact will send you a variety of combinations to try.

Again, welcome.

Chris
 

·
Pullin' Thread
Joined
·
4,694 Posts
Jordan,

A 14' 9 wt in 2-hand rods is the equivalent of the 9' 6 wt is single hand rods. In other words, it is the "all around rod" that can be used for both summer and winter steelhead. It will be a little heavy for low-water summer run fishing in late summer/early fall and a little light for large fly, big water winter steelhead. However, both can be done with it and since you asked for a recommendation of a single rod for both, the 14' 9 wt is it.

As to brands, there are several selling rods for less than $500.00. CND, St. Croix, Redington, TFO, Lamiglas, G. Loomis, Echo, Carron, and Scott all have 14' 9wt 2-handers for $500.00 or less. As to which is best for you, it depends on the type of action you like described in terms of how fast or slow the rod recovers after being bent, how far down the blank you like the rod to bend when casting (tip, middle, butt), how stiff the rod is, etc.

The best thing to do is cast as many of the 14' 9wt rods as you can selling for $500.00 or less, which may be a problem since you live in Colorado. Therefore, I suggest you pick a 2-hander that has an action similar to what you like in single-hand rods. If you like a fast single-hander, look at the G. Loomis Devron or Alta, Carron, or Redington rods; if you like a medium-fast, moderately stiff single-hander look at the Scott LS2; if you like a more moderate single-hander with fairly fast recovery, look at the St. Croix, or CND Custom; and if you like slower, softer rods, look at the CND Expert, Lamiglas, or Echo.


These rods range in price from $250.00 for the TFO and Echo to about $500 for the G. Loomis and Scott.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Jordan,

I completely understand living in a "spey vacume". Most of the information I've recieved in my part of the country has been misinformation. Adding up rods, lines, ect. I've spent alot of $$ to find a set up for what I do. I've had to teach myself to cast, and teach myself the spey language.

Thankfully your targeted waters are the PNW. The vast majority of the info you'll find on here is PNW related. I've had to take the info here and tweak it a little to make it work on my waters.

It's easy to get discouraged, but don't. The vast majority of people I've met or talked to in the spey community are great people (well spoken, helpfull, and generaly of higher ethics). Basicly a better class of angler.

Unfortunately there is no majic combo for everyone. I got countless recomendations, and.........what I like is way different than any of them. You're opinions on tackle will change with time, you'll hook yourself a bunch of times :rolleyes: , and eventualy ............you'll put it all together and find your groove.

P.S. Don't forget to factor the line into the budget. A line, tips, cheaters, ect can reach $200+
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks a lot for all the good info; I knew that if I went trolling here I would catch something! A 14' 9wt sounds like it is the rod I am looking for - an all around rod, and a place to start. You'll be glad to know I have a slew of books and DVDs converging on me at the moment, via amazon.com. Hopefully some of that info will penetrate my thick skull.

I'm going to keep on reading the boards and digging into what resources I can find, adn will definitely let you guys know whqat rod I end up with! As line, I thought the Rio Windcutter 8/9/10 looked pretty good, since it has all the different tip options. I also have a reel that I think might do the trick. (Ross BG-5) All I really lack is the rod and the skills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Jordan,
If you wan't a WC 8/9/10. I've got it. I've got all the tips, wallet, and cheaters too. It's all brand spanking new in the box. I had a 14' 9 too, but I sold it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Jordan--
Call Anglers All in Denver. That's were I got my spey casting lessons-- at a multi-day clinic given by Simon G. himself, no less. If I remember correctly, they have some two-handers laying around that you can try (and, of course, buy), too. Have fun.

JE
 

·
loco alto!
Joined
·
3,054 Posts
Jordan, unless you plan to fish the biggest winter rivers for the biggest winter fish, I'd recommend an 8 wt as the all around rod.

IMO, a 9 wt might have been standard 7-10 years ago, when the market was dominated by more noodly rods with slow recovery. Today we have better rods and higher performance (even if soft action, they recover quickly). A 8 wt can be cast quite far and fights fish very well, unless you are tackling big chinook.

Ask yourself, is a 6 wt really the current standard for trout, or is it the 4/5 wt?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the pointer to Angler's All. They offer lessons, and have some rods in store to try out. I'm heading down there now to check it out. (Denver traffic be damned!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Help

Jordan,
I am leaving for BC for two weeks but when I get back you are welcome to try the rods and line set ups I have. I live in Arvada so we should be able to hook up without too much trouble. Only problem is finding flowing water large enough to do the casting. I have only been able to cast at a local lake to try to get the timing for the upcoming trip. Talk soon.

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I was in your shoes a few weeks back

Having never touched a two-hander..I called Red Shed Fly Shop.. I got the CND Expert 1308, a Delta 7/8, and the Tioga 12..all in all a lot of bang for the buck. I caught my first spey rod fish with it last weekend - A 30# King. I think it's the perfect rod for GLs fishing. I've made a bunch of tips using braided mono loops and have a few sinking leaders as well..

The Hazel video was great - I was able to make fishable snake rolls, single, and double speys in a matter of minutes. I would definitely recommend it. I also grabbed the Simon G. book and gleaned a few tips from it as well. I can't believe how much fun the whole thing is..even when you're not catching - casting is tons of fun.

Matt
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
974 Posts
Jordan,

A couple thoughts:

Spey friendly shops are few and far between here in the Midwest as well. At some point, it is like buying your first single-handed rod, you just have to take the plunge.

The Ross BG-5 is going to be too small for the line that you are talking about. Spey Lines take up a lot of space compared to single-handed lines.

I would hold off on buying a line until after you purchase your rod.

Good luck!
David
 

·
Pullin' Thread
Joined
·
4,694 Posts
Jordan,

I noticed on a different post of yours that you have been fishing and like using quality cane rods. Since this is the case, I'd recommend you look at the slower, softer, full-flex 2-handers like the 14' 9wt CND Expert, Loop Black or Yellow series, and Echo because they will have a feel somewhat like what you like and are used to in the cane rods you have been using. In other words, you will feel them bend to the cork like your cane rods when cast.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
974 Posts
Jordan,

Before you run and get a 14' 9, where are you planning on fishing and at what time of year? You may want to review your rod rod choice with your fishing options when you visit the fly shop just make sure you get the best rod/fishing combination.

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Wow, the information just keeps coming! Thanks!

Fishinfool: Have a great time in BC! I'm defininitely jealous!

David: As for places I'd like to fish with this rod, I mostly had the larger rivers of the PNW in mind. I definitely plan to try for some winter Steelhead this year. I was hoping to find a rod that could cover a pretty wide range of water and seasons - just something to learn on, and get my foot in the door. If I know myself, other rods will follow as I zero in on the kind of fishing I like and some specific destinations.

Flytyer: Yes, I have been known to fish cane rods here in Colorado from time to time. For as long as I can remember, I have been a short-rod enthusiast. (I grew up fishing tight, brushy, fast-flowing streams of TN and NC) Although graphite excels in many areas, I think the best short fishing tools are still made of cane. Although my area stinks for 2-handed rods and resources, it's probably the cane capitol of the world.

As to specific rod models, I've got to wait until I get a lesson or two under my belt. As it is, I can't tell a good rod from a bad one, other than in terms of cosmetics and components. My plan is to learn a little bit about how to cast, and then try to get my hands on as many rods as possible.

Thanks a TON for all the good info here - you guys have been great!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
Spey friendly shops

.................David,I don't know where you are located in thte midwest,but the Manistee, the Pierre Marquette,and the Muskegan, all have shops or guides that know their way around a two-handed rod. If you stop in they will be more than happy to spend some time with you,and answer any questions.
 

·
Steelhead are cool!
Joined
·
572 Posts
I would recommend a 8139 Burkheimer or 14' 8/9 highlander from Meiser.
Both are great rods and will work for heavy winter tip work and a long dry line for summer.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
974 Posts
spey machine said:
.................David,I don't know where you are located in thte midwest,but the Manistee, the Pierre Marquette,and the Muskegan, all have shops or guides that know their way around a two-handed rod. If you stop in they will be more than happy to spend some time with you,and answer any questions.
That is true. I am in Chicago-area and fish mainly in WI and fish MI only about 2 - 4 a year (something I will have to change). I know of only one shop in Chicago where a owner/manager/key employee regularly fishes a spey rod and they stock spey rods.

I just said spey shops are few and far here.

David
 

·
Member FRSCA
Joined
·
2,264 Posts
Jordan,

Depending on which route you go, I have a Ross BG6 I can let go for ALOT less than what they cost new. Its a bit small for the 14ft 9wt class, but it does the job on a 13ft 7 or 8wt rod. Drop me a PM if you interested.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top