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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I recently moved over to Oregon fron Montana and am just getting into this spey thing for my new steelhead fling. I've gone a couple of time with a guide and am Feeling the itch. I'm thinking seriously about the Loomis Roaring River series, in particular the Dredger or Greased Line, but I'm a little lost about which one and size/weight. I'll be fishing mostly on the Deshutes for steelhead and would like to go light but would like something with a little diversity for over the mountains on the Sandy and Clack. Any thoughts?
 

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Welcome to the Board

FF. I would suggest something of the order of the Meiser 13' 6" for 7/8, either FES or MKS. I have used the Sage 7136-4 on the Deschutes and it is a lot of fun too. There are a few times and places where I wanted more distance, or better action in the wind than I could get with the Sage.

When you fish the Sandy, or on the West side with tips, just put a Skagit head on and these rods will work great. A salmon or big steelhead, might push the Sage.

I am not familiar with the Loomis rods, but they have a great reputation, so I am sure you can find one with the same general capabilities as those I suggested and you will have a great time.

Since you are new to spey, one of the best things you can do is to get some good instruction. That will shorten the learning curve. If you do that first, you will get to try a number of rods and find out what you like before you make your first purchase.
 

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T&T 1307 (built by Bob Meiser :smokin: )

This is an incredible rod. It handles the 6/7 Mid Spey like a dream. For tips the Rio Skagit 450 plus the tip of your choice. Bob Pauli turned me onto the Skagit line after extensive line/rod research and I couldn't be happier.

Meiser's work is incredible and his guarantee is better than most in the industry plus you get to deal with a great guy.

Chris
 

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Contact River Addict/Ed Ward and Meiser via this board

Fish_Finder#1 said:
So, I recently moved over to Oregon fron Montana and am just getting into this spey thing for my new steelhead fling. I've gone a couple of time with a guide and am Feeling the itch. I'm thinking seriously about the Loomis Roaring River series, in particular the Dredger or Greased Line, but I'm a little lost about which one and size/weight. I'll be fishing mostly on the Deshutes for steelhead and would like to go light but would like something with a little diversity for over the mountains on the Sandy and Clack. Any thoughts?
Contact River Addict aka Ed Ward via private mail and arrange to get Skagit casting lessons from Ed Ward. He will have the appropriate Loomis rods to try and Skagit lines to try. That would probably be your best investment ever in the Two Handed rod world.

Then, contact Bob Meiser and have him loan you a couple of rods to try on the D.

Then you can decide what rod to buy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So would the Skagit style be the ticket for these situations. I hear that the Dredger is the Skagit rod of the series though I've also heard that they are fairly slow in feel. I've become much more accustom to a faster rod so I'm leaning toward the Greased Line series. Do you think a 14' 8/9 is a bit too much for the deshutes steelies even though it may be the ticket on the sandy? Also would the 15' 7/8 be to long?

On another note, Bob Meiser makes his rods available to borrow? That pretty generous. I'll have to look into this...
 

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So many questions

when we begin this process of learning. Part of the reason for suggesting lessons, is to give you a chance to answer some of thesw questions "hands-on".

The Mesier FES is a greaseline style rod, that also works well with tips and a Skagit style line. The MKS is a tip/Skagit style rod that also works well with longer floating lines. The question for me would be what am I going to do most? If it is mostly tip work, then I would gravitate to the MKS. If it is mostly floating line work, then the FES.

Rods are an individual thing, so you may like one style a lot more than the other, and is is nice to know that before you purchase, rather than later, Gee I wish...

The 8/9 will work on the Deschutes. I have a 15' for 7/8, the Highlander series, coming from Bob Meiser, that I plan to fish a lot this summer on the Deschutes.

Bob Meiser is one of the Board Sonsors (see sponsor list at top). He sends out rods for folks to test out in fishing conditions, then you get to make the choice. This is a great service.
 

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Steelhead are cool!
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Burkheimer 7133 would be a great rod for the Deschutes or the 7140.
The 13'6" 7/8 MKS by Meiser is a great rod also.
 

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loco alto!
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Fish_Finder#1 said:
... which one ...
... you can never have only one :smokin:

you've got a tradeoff to consider. The fish run small on average (5-6 lbs), but the afternoon wind can be hell.

lo-wind, for fun, I like a rod to cast 6/7 mid or long lines.
hi-wind, I like a rod to handle a WC 7/8/9 or 8/9/10. I'm lazy. These slightly heavier lines makes casting into the wind a sure thing, so I can focus on fishing.

I've tried 4 GLX Greased Liners and found them all to be great. By my tastes, the 14' 8/9 would be too much. It handles 8/9 mid lines. For Deschutes fish, I think rod power of 6/7 or 7/8 mid lines is about right. I've only cast one Dredger and it was pretty soft, but quick recovery, so if you have a soft-slow-tuned stroke that can generate good line speed with that rod then it might work for you.

beg, borrow, and steal before you decide. A 13' vs. 15' rod are night and day. I use both. Lots of people I know really prefer one or the other.
 

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I had the privilage of taking a clinic taught by Steve Choate and Way Yin. Steve had the Greasline 15" 7/8 with an XLT line and it was amazing to cast. Everyone who cast it got a big smile on their face. I was thinking it would be an excellent Deshutes/ Umpqua rod as the line was zipping through the air. I was also fond of the new Scott LS2 14' 8wt with an XLT line.

I would strongly agree with everyone who recommends getting instruction immediately. There are many good rods that will fit the criteria you have, but matching them with the right line and using them properly is going to make the biggest difference to your casting and fishing experience.
 

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Here we go again!
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I have not fished the Deschutes yet, but have cast the Loomis rods and the 15' 7/8 is really more like an 8/9. Compared to other 7/8 rods I've tried, the Loomis 7/8 was as much a 7/8 as the Sage 7141 is a 7 weight.
It ain't! :tsk_tsk:

I think the nicest all around light steelhead rod I've thrown yet is the Burkheimer 13'3" 7 weight, as it throws tips with ease and is a super sweet dry line rod. It may be shorter than you'd like though if you're courting 14 and 15 footers. The Burkie 14' 7 weight is a dream to cast a dry line on, but I doubt it would handle tips well. Everything I've heard about the Meiser 15' 7/8 is that is is an amazing rod with dry line or tips, I'm looking forward to trying it out. The one thing I'd seriously consider here is, why pay over $900 for a production rod when you can get a custom Burkie or Meiser for the same or less? The difference is amazing! Not to knock the Loomis line at all, but the price point is just way too high for what you get.
 

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Fish finder,

As you are finding out everyone has an opinion with what rod to get and not necessarily the rods you are asking about. ;)

A good all around rod would be an 8wt. Any of the rods 13 to 15 feet will work fine. Everything kind of goes in cycles with spey people. A couple years ago it was Long rods with long belly lines now it is going to a little shorter rods with shorter belly lines and skagit casting. It will come back around again I am sure at some point.

As a beginner it might be easier to go a little shorter 13-14 feet 8 or 9 wt. I would venture to say most guys here started out with a 14 foot 9 wt rod. I don't have a lot experience with the Loomis road but see there are some in that catagory. I think an 8\9 will be fine on the deschutes (though a 7 would be just fine down there too) and give you a good cross over to the Sandy or other rivers.

One of the sponsors of the site is the The Fly Shoppe in Welches, OR not sure how close you are to there but they have done a nice article that describes the rods you were asking about and about the series of rods you were looking at too at http://www.flyfishusa.com/rods/g-loomis/g-loomis-th.htm. Check them out it will help.

I would say for a beginner a little faster rod is better. A little easier to learn on. (some may disagree with me). One thing one of the best caster told me was there are no bad rods anymore you just have to get the right line for the rod and it will cast just fine. I believe that to be true. Some rods suit different peoples styles better but there are no bad rods.

So look for a 13-14 foot rod in the 8 to 9 wt range with maybe a faster action and I doubt you will go wrong if you match it with the right line.

JJ
 

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The advise that was given to me when I first started was cast a lot of rods and buy the one you like. Fast or slow learn to cast the action you like. In the end you will spend less time and money.
Mike
 
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