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Thanks to the efforts of Mark Yuhina, we have a date for the New England Spey Clave = May 5, 2012.

Location is Barkhamsted, CT, American Legion and People's State Forest on the Farmington River.

http://www.ct.gov/dep/cwp/view.asp?a=2716&q=325054

Planning to have factory reps. attend with rods and lines, and demos for spey casting.

No charge for the day, the event is pre season and Matthies Grove will not have any fees.

We will check if fees apply for campground on West River Road that weekend.

Matthies Grove picnic area on East River Road:
http://www.ct.gov/dep/lib/dep/stateparks/maps/peoples.pdf

Regards,
FK
 

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Nice to have one close; I've marked it on the calendar. Will sombreros be mandatory?
 

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wonderful!!!

Wow... great post Fred,

Thank you sooo much for organize those details! You are the super organizer!
I can't wait to attend the event!! :)

Thank you!

Mark
 

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This is great news!

I've not been spending much time on any forums this past year but glad to find this!

Todd, will be great to see you in CT - next stop after the Farmy will be the Big Ditch :smokin:
 

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Hi Adrian - it is good to see you around here!
 

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Hey Tyler - great to be back.

The annual Spey gathering at the Cape Cod Canal goes from strength to strength and this year the VT contingent caught fish :smokin:
 

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Now that I am officially retired I would like to once again get my West Coast butt out onto the flats of the Cape... don't know exactly when - but it is on the list!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hey Tyler - great to be back.

The annual Spey gathering at the Cape Cod Canal goes from strength to strength and this year the VT contingent caught fish :smokin:

Adrian,

Would you or one of your associates be willing to give a discussion or demo, specific to salt water DH casting and equipment at the clave?

People have expressed interest in this area and the event planners have rather limited experience.

Regards,
FK
 

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Adrian,

Would you or one of your associates be willing to give a discussion or demo, specific to salt water DH casting and equipment at the clave?

People have expressed interest in this area and the event planners have rather limited experience.

Regards,
FK
Fred,

That would be an interesting "break-out" topic. I certainly don't class myself as an expert. When it comes to casting, I put myself in the "experienced beginner" category with aspirations to achieving intermediate status someday.

Many situations in the salt are no more than an extension of the techniques used on rivers - although the scale maybe be bigger, the evironment a lot harsher on gear and the fish potentially somewhat larger :)

The Cape Cod Canal is a special case that presents a unique set of challenges and opportunities. Not sure if Paul Cheaver hangs out here - he has probably logged as many hours with d/h gear there as anyone?
 

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I agree with Adrian, Paul is the guy I know of with by far the most experience with DH in the salt: a Canal specialist, but lots of beach time also.
My perspective is one of a beginner starting to learn. I've been fly fishing the salt for a long time, but only 4-5 years with DH gear & techniques. So far I've found the Canal to require mostly Spey (mostly Skagit) casts with occasional overhead possible; the flats completely overhead; the beach mostly overhead with very occasional Spey. I have found that I typically want a heavier set up for the Canal. One thing that is great about all three of these very different environments is the high % of intercepting visible moving fish.

I've already started scheming with the boss about bringing the camper down for this.
Cinque de Mayo with Two-handers and just possibly Vt. micro-brews: what's not to like?
 

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Please!

Hey Adrian and vtloon,

That's sounds fantastic!! Please invite Paul to attend the event!! I am really looking forward to meet you guys! We should have a ton's of fun! :)

Cheers,

Mark
 

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saltwater and the dh-

In my experience this means mostly estuaries and rocky coastlines, and the only setup i have used is skagit. The flies I fish and conditions I have run across require that short, heavy head that can punch thru 30mph wind while throwing big deer hair bugs, flatwings and heavy clousers.

A lot of my work in estuaries is strictly floating line and mostly shallow situations, 4-8 ft, with bass pursuing herring. to throw a big herring fly and swing it in the tide without hanging you need the floater, and you need that floater to handle big bugs. thats why I go skagit.

the rocky shores and beaches are a little different. these situations i will fish a sinktip 8-10 ft. I ran 9 ft t17 sinktip on the end of my 700 gr skagit head last year. This coupled with 9 ft leader and heavy clouser or deciever type flies gets the job done for strip retrieves.

I almost find it blasphemous to overhand my dh, its just not the way the rod is designed for its application. My experience fishing the cape flats comes from before I started using DH rods. Me and my bro have talked about this at length, but I have no doubt that I could cast skagit on the flats without disturbing these fish from the experiences I have had targeting them with the SH. When casting the dh skag style, if you are kicking up huge commotions and throwing water like a bucket, the technique probably needs work. Its a lot of grains to be chunking around but with time and practice you can do it with little commotion. Also, when that 700 grain head comes flying down into the water, you can land it with ease with just a little drop of the rod tip. Clear water or murky water, fish dont like a big splash over there head in shallow scenarios.

When I think about wade fishing flats and sand beaches as is the case down the cape, I kind of think people put to much emphasis on line speed and distance. How many times do you see someone false cast 5 times to work out 70 ft of line, only to hit the water on a backcast, lose momentum and throw a pile of spaghetti. Where if you are using the dh and a sustained anchor cast, its the same amount of work every time. Also in my surf fishing experience down the cape, blasting 90 deg from the beach probably wont yield the best results, also, unless you are in some serious waves. thigh deep with 3 footers rolling at you every 4 seconds, There should be no reason the dh cant be used with a sustained anchor cast.

This is just my look on things, certainly not meant to ruffle feathers nor do I claim to be an expert. just giving examples from things i have experienced.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Adrian, vtloon, mkspey 83,

Fantastic discussion, if any of you guys are planning on attending, please bring some flys and your rods/lines.

Nothing formal for discussion, we will set up a table for interested people to sit down and visit with you and learn some details of the DH rods in the salt water environment.

1. What lines to use for beaches, deep structure, inlets and shallow water.
2. Advantages of Spey casting vs. overhead DH.
3. Presentations of the fly vs. raw max. distance casting.
4. Discussion of fly patterns.

This is a very important part of a Spey Clave,,,,, sharing information with other FF.

Regards,
FK
 

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Mike - your experiences definitely mirror my own. The only other variable I would add is the concept of "swinging" flies on a floating line in the surf at relatively short ranges. I was a diehard intermediate/fast sink fly caster on the beach until I ran into some guys who really knew how to read the beach and subtleties of the current patterns. Watching them pick up nice bass right under their rod tips was a humbling experience :)

The past couple of seasons my sightfishing/flats approach is throwing a fast sinking head (I use the Rio Striper line) to get the fly down fast. This has dramatically improved my hook-up ratio at the Sight Fishing Graduate School - a.k.a Brewster Flats. I haven't really though about using the d/h on the flats but interested to hear more - you can never have too many "arrows in the quiver".
 

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Hey Adrian-

yeah I have always wanted to swing a fly in the surf on a floater, just thinking about that fly undulating in the waves and moving with the current... How could a bass not eat it. The floating line in my opinion is very over looked in our striper world. The last few years I have started using it on the boat around some of our rock piles and small islands in Boston harbor. Its a great way to present the fly in some of our ledges and rips. The takes on the surface from a big bass are hard to beat.

Its been a while since I have waded the flats down the cape, few years anyway. But when I did fish them it was with a fast sinking head. Its awesome watching a fish chase down your fly in those situations. Even better when they tip their tail and eat your crab fly off the bottom.. Its wild the way these fish will forage the flats. Im going to have to head down the cape this year, been too long.
 

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Todd (VtLoon)
If you bring the beers....I will bring..... ummm.....ummmm....ummmm
ME
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Not that far from the Lake George!
 

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Interesting thoughts and some things to try. I had never considered Skagit casts on the flats; almost all my flats time is with a single hand...for lines either Int or sink-tip. Except for the canal, in my saltwater DH to date I've used a 40+ or 40+Beach which are great and low effort for overhead. You can Spey cast these; it's not optimal, but it's ok for most outflows and for along beach flow .
Also, I'm more inclined to use DH if it looks like a pure blind casting day or it is really honking. My semi-bionic shoulders thank me.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Traces of didymo were noticed in Feb/Mar and then disappeared. Through the summer and fall no additional didymo was found.

The river is a tailwater with two cold water dam releases upstream relative to the trout management areas.

It is a non issue at this time however, it will be researched again this spring to find any new evidence of didymo. If it is discovered again, we will have salt water washing available as recommended by TU.

I personally dedicate one set of waders and boots to the Farmington and have a second set for other rivers in New England.

Regards,
FK
 

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can't wait!
 
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