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Discussion Starter #1
Am trying out spey fishing and just purchased a 9/10 14' CND Expert and tried it w/ the 8/9 Delta Spey floating that Redshed suggested I use w/ this rod. I am studying the Rio International and the Hazel's video's and tried my hand on the river twice.

I want to get a multi-tip set-up for Steelhead on the Clearwater and liked Air Flo's when I tried it with single hand casting for winter steelhead on the Grande Ronde. I didn't like Rios' version as a friend and I both had trouble w/ the Rio's stiffer loops not wanting to go through the guides very easily (could be trouble w/ the final stages of landing a fish..)

What weight Air Flo multi-tip line should I be getting w/ this rod? the 8/9 like Mike sent or the heavier 9/10?

PS- if any of you know or are a forum member that live near Sandpoint Idaho that could give some Spey casting tips, it sure would be appreciated!
 

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Junkyard Spey
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7,112 Posts
Hey promtbr...

Simon's line list recommends the 8/9/10 WC as being right for that rod and a newer caster. He is usually dead on in his choices. The 8/9 Delta is very close to the same grain weight. The two lines are also very close in casting weight on Peter's chart.

If you like the way the 8/9 casts on that rod then why get a different weight for using tips? If you don't like they way that line works then I want to get you something that will work, for you. Spey tackle that doesn't work does neither of us any good.

If you don't like the Rio loops you most likely will not like the Airflo loops any better. For fishing the Clearwater a sinking poly leader right off the line tip seems to work pretty good but learning to cast the floater first is the way to go.

If you let me know when you are coming down I will meet you somewhere on the river to help you. As for casting advice keep watching John and Amy, paying attention to the Double spey and the Circle C and practice, practice, practice.
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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1,771 Posts
Mike offers great advice as usual.

My philosophy for sinktips is to strive to replace the front taper of the line with a matching front taper that happens to sink instead of float. Therefore the line you like currently is the right line, and you need to figure out how to replace the front taper with a length of line that sinks.

That's what the Delta w/ tips has done so I would go for it. Per your difficulty with loop connections, have you seen the latest loops? They are very compact and nothing like the loops of old.

I use the Windcutter 8/9/10 with tips on that rod and like the match up a lot. I also really like the Midspey 8/9 with an 8wt type 4 tip on it (see below).

Another option is to make your own system, something us PNW steelheaders have done for decades:

Pick up a shooting head, there are many out there and they are very inexpensive. I would go with either a 9wt or even an 8wt hi-density 30ft shooting head that has a nice taper to it. I have familiarity with SA wet cel type 4 but there are many out there to choose from.

Cut the first foot off the front of the shooting head, find the end of the front taper, make sure it's at least 13ft from the tip, and cut again. You now have a 13ft taper and a 16ft dredger tip waiting for loops of your choice.

Now here's the hard part - cutting the Delta. Most lines are cut back around 15ft from the tip, but I would double-check with either Tim Rajeff, the guys at Kaufmanns Bellevue or Brian Simonseth (homer2handed) if you are nervous about it. Most likely 15ft will be just fine. Cut there and add loops of your choice.

Inventory:

You now have:

Hybrid Delta Line,
Original floating tip,
13ft finesse sinktip,
16ft dredger tip

The objective is to replace the front taper with something that sinks instead of floats. Ready to chase winter steel!
 

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Here we go again!
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620 Posts
I was using the 9/10 long delta on my 14' 9/10 Expert. It was slightly heavy, but the advantage to that, for a new caster, is that it is easier to feel the rod load with the heavier head. I thought the 8/9 a bit too light.

But hell, if Mike is willing to meet you on the water and bring a few lines, you'd be crazy not to take him up on it. Try the Delta lines he has and then you'll know, no guessing. I will say that the Delta spey tapers are great lines with great turnover, and Mike is one of the true class acts in the business. He wants you to be happy with what you've got, period. I live hundreds of miles and 3 states away from him and choose to do business with him because of his attitude and integrity. Listen to the man and you'll end up happy with what you've got.

One last thought, if you do a search here on fishing with tips you'll see that there is a big difference in how a floating line is cast and how a sink tip line is cast. Get a line that loads the rod properly and concentrate on technique. The secret to casting tips is not so much the line as it is the time spent PRACTICING!!
 

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Junkyard Spey
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7,112 Posts
In the Long Delta the 9/10 is a great choice for a new caster and that rod. In the Delta model the 8/9 is a much better choice in my opinion. I personally like the 7/8 Delta on that rod. I do have lines on both sides of the 8/9 that promtbr is welcome to use to dial in if he can't make the 8/9 go to his satisfaction. I am most interested in him having a line that "works for him". I believe that with more time on the water he will be quite happy with the 8/9.
Rajeff told me to cut the floaters the same as the factory models (15'). I have the grain weights wrote down in the shop for 15' of that line and I will be happy to provide that info to promtbr or anyone else for that matter. I most likely even have a stray piece of sinktip laying around here for making a tip and a couple feet of Gudebrod 50# braided mono for loops that I would throw in to the deal since promtbr did buy a rod and floating line from me.
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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1,771 Posts
Thanks for the confirmation on the 15' Mike! I'll try it this winter / spring.
 

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Registered
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Discussion Starter #7
Wow, this is an active forum!

I am surprised w/ all the responses.

Mike, I am not at all unhappy w/ the rod or the line, it seems to work great the 15 or so casts out of a 100 that seem to replicate a double spey or snake roll etc.
(river left, river right, reverse casts etc are giving me fits as my practice site is the Clark Fork River and its rever left and I'm a right hander!)

I am not good enough to know if the rod/line weight is not right for me is kind of why I asked for input on suggestions on the weight of a Multi tip set up multiple sources. I like your suggestions and I definitely WILL try to stick to floating line to practice. I am an overall newbie steelheader and am really only familiar w/ dredging for February steelhead on the Ronde w/ class 3 and 6 shooting heads.

I am interested in taking a sinking tip option along if I make a trip to the Clearwater in a week or two (a local who is also taking up spey is going to show me his haunts). If I see big/ deeper water I am conditioned not to have confidence that the fish will come up to a floating line presentation.

Yes, I do know how to cut tips, make heads and make braided loops etc. I think I will just go with a Air Flow or Rio 8/9 Multi tip for now. So the Circle cast is the one for tips huh? (* cringe*)...

Love to take you up on the time on the water offer, but I'm a family dude and if I can get away 3-4 times a year between winter and fall to steelhead thats about max. Steelheading on the Ronde or the Clearwater is about 5 hrs drive for me. (might have to look at the Methow)

I can practice casting after work a couple of times a week in the late afternoons on the Clark Fork which is about an hr away.

I may have to look at that Mini spey thing on the North Fork to combine a fishijg trip with spey education.

Thanks for all the input and thanks Mike for the gret service and gracious offer! I will look you up if I make it down your way on a fishing trip
 

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Junkyard Spey
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7,112 Posts
Hey promtbr...

I didn't think you were unhappy else I would of had a phone call. :chuckle:

Also I started to add but was interupted, I will gladly send you a 9/10 Delta demo line so you can see for yourself if it helps in your casting.
 

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Here we go again!
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620 Posts
If you're fishing river left and you're right handed you should have no problems. Face 45 degrees downstream and practice your single spey. Don't try to cast straight across at 90 degrees, just concentrate on aiming at that 45 degree spot and keep your casts to about 50 feet or so. You'll get the hang of it. As for the circle spey/snap T, it is easier than the single spey. Get ahold of the Dec Hogan video, great demonstrations of these casts.

You might want to keep that floater intact and just use the 10 foot sinking trout poly leaders. They will be a breeze to cast and will still get your fly down. They work great with the Delta lines.

Keep it simple until you get real comfortable.
 
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