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Dana--The switch cast looks a lot like a single spey with a much larger anchor point, or maybe the anchor point is just farther down stream. What's the difference between this cast and the single spey? Nice pictures on both. BFR
 

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New Casting Videos

Dana,
Thanks for listing this site, they're not as good as those at your Spey Pages but they're a nice additional reference.

On the subject of video clips, any chance we might twist your arm to add a clip to the Spey Pages of the Perry Poke cast.

Try as I may to understand written descriptions I've read of the cast, I can't grasp what the heck the various writer's are trying to convey. The visual imagery might just help me and a few others out there to pierce the veil of fog. Thanks, John
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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I can't think of a better way to celebrate the upcoming server upgrade than with a collection of videos, but for now we need to hold off just a bit longer. Each video burns several mb per download, multiply by the number of people who watch and you are quickly into the red zone for bandwidth limits.

Sean and I hope to complete the upgrade next month, if it works for Dana the Perry Poke will be one of the featured casts.

thanks for your patience and contributions,
Juro
 

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chrome-magnon man
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Discussion Starter #5
BFR,

the switch cast can be looked upon as a single spey without the change of direction. What you are seeing in Tak's images is the anchor made downstream of the caster. The switch cast is what Jim Vincent calls the "liveline roll cast" in the booklet and videos. In the switch the line is simply picked up and cast back downstream again.

Now just to confuse things a little there is of course the "Grant Switch" which is a highly efficient form of the single spey described by Jock Scott in the book Fine and Far Off. In the Grant there is a change of direction, but the top hand does not describe the saucer shape during D loop formation common in the more traditional forms of the single spey.
 

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Dana,

Thanks for the explanation. It seems like you'd be limited to using a fairly short head with the switch as well as the limitation of basically being able to cast directly downstream of where you are, whereas with the traditional single spey you can cast with a bit longer head (your anchor is farther upsteam) and you can cast a bit farther upsteam. What's the main advantage of the switch over the single spey, besides just moving the rod through a shorter casting stroke? BFR
 

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chrome-magnon man
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Discussion Starter #7
anchor placement

Tak is simply placing his anchor there because he doesn't need to change direction with the switch. If he was executing a change of direction he would have brought the anchor upstream of his position.

Single speys and switch casts are not limited to the choice of line system. You can make a switch with a shooting head or an extended belly line; the same holds true for a single spey.

If you have a look at Tak making a single spey here you'll see him make a change of direction with a long belly line.

The switch cast is an important building block of any spey cast. Once the change of direction is made, all remaining casting motions are basically variations of the switch cast. Switch casts can also be used to lift a deeply sunk line to the surface prior to a change of direction cast. In and of itself the switch cast (again, NOT the Grant Switch) is fairly limited as a fishing tool because of the lack of directional change--you're simply popping the fly back downstream again. Tak is an expert caster (although he'd never claim that) and his switch photo series is a very helpful illustration of that key element of spey casting, the switch cast.
 

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Thanks for the clarification, Dana.
BFR
 

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chrome-magnon man
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Discussion Starter #10
yes

although I have only seen Tak cast on video, his style seems similar to Nobuo Nodera's--lots of top hand. You'll note though that the top hand drives forward, almost as if Tak is trying to push his hand through the blank, rather than a bowling motion. I've studied how Nobuo does this and it is really quite remarkable and different than what we understand in North America as "traditional spey casting", although I understand that in certain parts of the UK this style is prevalent. With this method the bottom hand certainly helps out, but it is to a much smaller degree than what we are used to seeing, perhaps only 20%.

Nobuo, perhaps you can elaborate on this style for us?
 

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Hi Dana,

Yes I totally agree with your explanation about Switch cast, it is most fundamental style of Spey casting. Anchor position is the just matter of the direction you want to cast, unless you want to cast more than 90 degree of direction change you don�ft have to bring Fly up above your position. Fly just to be slightly above the direction of cast to avoid tangle on line.
Regarding to the question about ratio of top hand and lower hand, it is not really the matter of style. Most important point is that fishing comfortably with Speycast, after all day fishing shouldn�ft get so much tired and without trouble. I found my style and Tak�fs style (This originally come from Jim Love who is excellent local angler in Grantown-on-Spey. He is great caster and instructor too) to make all movement of Speycast easier. You could control line lift and Anchor position only by upper hand so less risk of variant on Anchor position. But important, holding grip I put more firm on lower grip let�fs say 70% on lower grip and 30 % on upper grip so I don�ft get any tiredness on upper hand. Just use upper hand to control of rod movement.
In addition to this we could utilize total rod length by not moving lower hand. 15�f rod we could use as 15�f. If you pull lower hand 50%, 15�f rod becomes 14�f due of moving up fulcrum, it loose some energy of rod. Answer to your question I don�ft pull lower hand at all, even on the contrary some time I push lower hand too. (Push Upper hand 95% and push lower hand 5%) This will create extra length on rod because the fulcrum moves farther down. I also tried using both styles �gupper hand push and lower pull�h but concluded use of upper hand only, it makes me easier and comfortable fishing all day.
However good to know different casting style, so try it once then decide whichever suit you for good fishing.
:chuckle:
 

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J,

I regard to conserving bandwidth, can a parameter be established to limit video downloads by user name. Let folks know they should save the vids to their hard drivers rather than down loading multiple times.

a
 
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