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Spey Is The Way
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Discussion Starter #1
I live in New Brunswick, Canada and fish atlantic salmon. The common setup here is a nine foot rod for a nine line. Spey rods have not caught on that much here yet. I realy want to try spey fishing and due to the fact I know no local people with a spey rod this is what I am thing of getting. It may not be what you would recomend but it is what I can get the easiest. I just want to know if this will get me started.
Rod:St. Croix 14 feet 9/10 line
Reel:Okuma Integrity large arbor 10/11
Line:SA Mastery Spey XLT 9/10
Thanks for any help or comments. I don't know why, but I have always wanted to use a two handed rod and I can get this local. Mail order from the US is not great these days due to the dollar. Again thanks for any help. :)
 

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just say no to bait
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115 Posts
Hi Leo,
I couldn't help but notice you have chosen a long head line and was wondering if you had checked out short or mid lines? There are advantages to all three. It seems here on this board that people have strong preferences about which lines they favour.

Without trying to to explain all the benefits and opinions here. Reading the various threads and searching the topic may help in your purchase. Have a good time with it and enjoy whatever you buy.

N I
 

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SRO Direct Dealer
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I have fished many hours with a St Croix 14' and the 8/9 XLT. It is a very good match. Just mark the line at 85'. Up to the mark in your hand the combination is pure pleasure. More line out the tip starts to over load the rod. Start with about 40' out of the tip and go from there.

Rich
 

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Spey Is The Way
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Discussion Starter #5
What is a mid spey line?
 

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Midspey

lines are about 65 feet in length. The windcutter/delta style lines are roughly 10 feet shorter in length.

You might want to read more about lines on Dana's Speypages site.
 

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Pullin' Thread
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I also recommend you not start out spey casting with a liong-belly spey line like the XLT. You would be far better served by starting with either the RIO MidSpey or Airflow Long Delta spey lines, and the interchangeable tips versions provide you with both floating and sink tips in one line package.

The St.Croix 14' 9/10 is not a bd rod; but it wil be much easier for you to learn spey casting with either the RIO MidSpey or Airflow Long Delta line in size 9/10. Another rod in the same price range ($250.00) that is a little faster and has a bit more backbone than the St. Croix is the Redington 14' 9/10.

Unless you know someone who spey casts that you can get some casting lessons from, I also recommend you get either the RIO International Spey Casting video, the Mel Krieger Spey Casting video, or the John and Amy Hazle spey casting video. Get one of these video, watch it several time before taking your rod out to the stream, and begin by casting on a lake from a dock to learn to basic cating moves. This will go a long way to helping you learn to spey cast while keeping frustration to a minimum.
 

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Here we go again!
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My 2 cents

I am a fairly new spey caster and have been playing with several lines and feel that the Rio Windcutter is the easiest line to learn on. I too have a 9/10 (CND) and have mid and long belly lines, but the shorter head Windcutter is better for slowly perfecting form. For me anyway.
 

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Board Consensus

seems to be that you can pick up some bad habits with the WC lines and still get the line out. The midspeys keep the form right, if you ever want to go to long belly lines, and are still easier to use than the XLT and grandspey style.
 

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Steelhead are cool!
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I agree with the shorthead or mid length. You will just whip
the water and yourself into a froth with the longbellies. Once you develop a good consistent stroke you can get a long line if you desire.

Kevin
 

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loco alto!
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there are plenty of good accomplished speycasters who learned on a regular old double taper. I personally see no substantive disadvantage to learning on a long belly line. Sure, you can't shoot as much line, BFD. Otherwise there are only advantages that come with learning casting technique over a range of distances.

Just be sure the line is matched to the rod, which in this case, it sounds like the line is too heavy for the rod.
 

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I started out with a WindCutter on the St. Croix and support the recommendations of others of learning to cast with a mid belly line (Mid Spey or Long Delta). I believe I would have learned better technique with the mid length line. The multi tip versions also offer much greater flexability in adapting to the fishing requirements.

Rich
 

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cast,mend,stumble,swear..
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Attention to detail and technique

I cast the "dreaded" sage 9140 (green blank, not the "brownie") AND an 8/9/10 windcutter... My goodness, with that combination, I don't have a chance in hell of successfully fishing, let alone casting.....if you listen to some on these pages (and I AM being a bit facetious guys!!:rolleyes: :hehe: :hehe: )...

Have seen the posts here and elsewhere where the shorter head spey lines (windcutter and delta spey are the most often referenced) are bemoaned for giving casters bad habits that may ultimately hinder their ability to cast a longer belly line. Seems many feel these short belly lines are to easy to cast badly, but still cast... Perhaps, but you can tell when you've used poor technique, and when you've hit it just right. The effortless cast, rewarded by line trying to literally rip the rod out of your hands is pretty indicative of timing, line placement, rod speed, casting pressure, etc. being just right. Feel that once, you'll never forget it. And if you really want to be good at spey casting, you'll practice and practice and practice and perfect all aspects of the cast. And for one who's diligent at that aim, he/she can learn that just as well on a windcutter/delta, mid-spey/delta long, grandspey/XLT, etc. And I'd contend that the rewards of at least getting a line out in fishable water (easier with a windcutter than the longer lines, as the assumption states) far out weigh the frustrations of flailing a longer belling line and doing nothing but lassoing one's neck... :whoa: As John Hazel states in his classes, the spey rod is nothing but a fly delivery device, used to get the fly to the fish. Don't care how ugly the cast is, if its to the fish, its fishing. If someone can effectively fish a roughly "speyed" windcutter, what more does he/she REALLY need???

Besides, the windcutter didn't seem to hurt me much, after casting it exclusively for the past year. a month ago, picked up Skilly's CND Custom 1308 with his "mystery" 74' head spey line, and could cast the head, plus shoot 10-20' of running line with relative ease. First time out. As with any rod/line/what ever, while the equipment is of importance, you gotta pay attention to the details of the mechanics. my buck and change.....:whoa:
 

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just say no to bait
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Another benefit with the shorter head spey lines such as the Windcutter or the Delta spey is the ease of shooting line and the stripping retrieve. Shooting line is no big deal, altough it is fun. However the retrieve is. I have hooked many Pacific salmon on the retreive and feel it is an important part of fishing the fly. I don't know if this is applicable to Atlantics.

N I
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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In fact stripping the fly is extremely applicable to atlantics, and there are many posts (try search on stripping the fly) whereby some of the most notable AS guys confirmed the importance in number of takes.

While fishing the Gaspe' last summer I was enlightened to the importance in this presentation technique by Topher Browne, who is quite the salmon angler himself.
 

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Wulff triangle taper

is what i'd recomend,i've got two of these rods for sale,no problems as they do make great `summer' rods;lightweight/throw small flies/dry lines well,just not really a ten wt,,,;)
 

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Wish I'd signed up here earlier. I've just ordered the 15ft St. Croix and the 10/11 SA mastery spey line. My old Hardy Marquis Salmon No. 2 will have to do for the reel, at least for the time being. According to the answers to your question though, Leo, looks like I'm in for a ton of trouble. I currently use an 11ft rod and have been fishing for over 40 years, and can cast a pretty long line with that...so, maybe not. I'm making my annual pilgrimage to Labrador on the 4th of July and will be taking the spey rod with me. Hope to tear myself away from the great fishing to do a little practising.
 

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Pullin' Thread
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Chare,

You got a good, ballance set up, and it is a great way to get stared spey casting. You should try and find someone to teach you how to spey cast to make your learning curve easier and faster. Either go out with someone you know who is a decent spey caster, take a spey casting class, or attend a spey clave, any of these are well worth the time and effort. If none of these is possible, get the RIO International Spey Casting video or DVD, the Derek Brown video, or the John and Amy Hazel spey casting video in order to see and have spey cast clearly explained.
 

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I have two spey casting videos,flytyer...Derek Brown's and Mel Krieger's,but the other options are non-existent. However,I'm a little concerned now that the SA XLT Mastery spey line will be too much for the rod. I've ordered the rod from Cabelas and the recommended line weight there for the rod was 10/11 so that's what I ordered. I should have it by Monday. Wish I'd signed up here earlier though..then I think I would have at least dropped back to the 9/10 Mastery or perhaps to a different line altogether. Too late now though. Hope it's not such a bad match that the rod just ends up gathering dust. I'll let you know after this two week trip I'm taking to Labrador (for Atlantic salmon)
 

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Junkyard Spey
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Hey Chare...

If you are uncomfortable with your line choice and have time ask Cabelas to exchange it of a Mastery Spey 9/10. There shouldn't be any problem doing that. Should that not be an option just keep a portion of the head in the guides. As a new spey caster you may not be able to cast the whole head to start anyway. After casting your outfit for a while if you find the sweet spot is less then the whole head you can cut it there and add a loop also cutting you running line at the junction of the rear taper and head and adding a loop there as well. You will then have a line fitted to your rod and style. The whole loop to loop operation is really quite simple and won't take an hour of your time. Good luck on your trip. Catch a BIG one. MJC
 
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