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Kent
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5 Posts
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Hi All,

I am new to spey casting and am putting together my first spey system. Lots to learn for me. Very fun too.

I have a 13 ft 2 handed 7 weight rod and will use a Skagit max 525 grain head. Will mostly be fishing for steelhead in Michigan and an occasional trip to BC. Mostly swinging flies on medium sized rivers in the midwest.

I think the next step is to get medium MOW tips. I know rio sells a MOW package of 6 tips. Wondering if I need to get the package or just a few individual tips or possibly some other sink tip entirely.

What would you experienced spey cast fishers recommend?

thanks for any advice,

Kent
 

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259 Posts
I'm a big fan of the OPST Commando Tips. You can get the three pack, or buy them individually, but I believe they simplify the choice of tip for a given spot.

Given your rod, I would recommend the 132 grain 12ft ones. They are labeled "riffle", "run", and "bucket"; which are pretty self explanatory.
 

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Wandering the Driftless
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20 Posts
I've found MOW tips hard to find stocked in various fly shops. I'm using the T11 medium ones and have been happy with them so far.

Other than the OPST commando tips, is there some competitor that is more popular, easier to source than the RIO MOWs that I'm naively unaware of?

I have started to use a little 4-6" loop to loop junction of 40# mono between the MOW tip loop and the tippet to keep the 0X or less tippet from cutting into the MOW tip loop too much given the big diameter difference.
 

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Broken Down Spey Freak
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2,319 Posts
It all depends on the water your fishing and they type of fly you tie on. Deeper faster water and cold weather will require a heavier tip. A weighted fly may allow for a lighter tip.
With MOW tips you can get various mix of float and sink. IMOW will give you intermediate and sink. Both come in split sections to acheive a goal. It real deep and or fast you may want to look at a full sink tip of T8 T10 etc.
Hope it helps.

Dan
 

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Premium Member
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687 Posts
availability

Hi
In this post someone mentioned not being able to locate MOW Tips..... One of the sponsors of this forum is The Fly Fishing Shop in Welches Oregon. They have a fine web presence and are fully stocked with whatever tips you might need. Here is their information:

Welches, OR
(800) 266-3971
[email protected]

(note: I don't have any connection other than being a customer)

We have some fine shops that all carry all of the products around Bend here too and if you need names I can get them for you. It's good to support sponsors for the pages...........

Good luck!
Loren
 

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I would go with the Imows. The 10' floater has has its place as well for getting bobber rigs way out there. JMO
 

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newcomer to spey casting
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477 Posts
Medium iMOW tips, one in the half intermediate half sinking configuration, one in the 2.5 feet of intermediate and the rest sinking configuration. The advice from john-speypages above to add a small tail of heavy mono with a small loop to avoid 0X leader from cutting into the MOW tips is key! Loop your three to five foot leader to the 40# mono, preventing wear and tear on the iMOW tip.The MOW or iMOW tips will last a long time if you do that.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
 

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JD
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3,620 Posts
Years ago, I asked Ed about using a length of intermediate line behind T-14. He was against it because, not being able to mend the intermediate section, he would not have the control he wanted. You have to understand how Ed fishes a MOW tip/ weighted fly setup. Ed does not rely on the T material to gain depth. He uses it to maintain depth. If he wants to make the fly rise up over some structure & then drop back down, he is able to do that by mending.

It took me a long time to figure out all this stuff regarding big heavy intruder flies. But the long & short of the casting part is, the sink rate (T stuff) is less important than the core material and the weight of the stuff. It takes mass (grains/foot) to turn over mass! T-14 is built on 35lb mono, the lighter T stuff is built on lighter, more flexible stuff. A longer sink tip will take longer to get down, but it will stay down better under tension. Shxt flows down hill. T-14 weighs duh, 14 grains/foot. If the tip of your (Skagit) head weighs less than 14 grains/foot, it's gonna have trouble transferring the energy on down thru a length of T-14.

Anything less than T-14 lacks the mass required to kick over those big heavy flies. If it lands in a heap, you have no control over the fly until the current straightens everything out. A fish could suck it in & spit it out & you would never know it. :Eyecrazy: I operate on the K.I.S.S. method. Start off with either a 6ft or 9ft T-14 MOW tip, put the other one in my shirt pocket. Fish one rig long enough to get a feel for what it can & cannot do. Adjust as required.
 

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There's a lot of different information in here; but the OP is a beginner and a lot of this will probably lead to more confusion. We should be helping to simplify their progression, not offer a million different options.

This is why I think the 6 tip MOW option isn't the best idea. The OPST ones at least are labelled to what the best water they may be used in, and I think that's a good idea if they're looking to buy a pack.

I think the best singular option is to buy one tip and use the hell out of it. Is the water you tend to fish slower, like a slow walking speed? Go buy one 12ft tip of level T8 and use it everywhere. If your water is a touch faster, go buy a 12ft tip of T10 or T11. Use it till it breaks. Learn to mend for depth. Don't get distracted over too many options.

Any online shops should have level T-tips in stock.
 

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There's a lot of different information in here; but the OP is a beginner and a lot of this will probably lead to more confusion. We should be helping to simplify their progression, not offer a million different options.

This is why I think the 6 tip MOW option isn't the best idea. The OPST ones at least are labelled to what the best water they may be used in, and I think that's a good idea if they're looking to buy a pack.

I think the best singular option is to buy one tip and use the hell out of it. Is the water you tend to fish slower, like a slow walking speed? Go buy one 12ft tip of level T8 and use it everywhere. If your water is a touch faster, go buy a 12ft tip of T10 or T11. Use it till it breaks. Learn to mend for depth. Don't get distracted over too many options.

Any online shops should have level T-tips in stock.
This is really good advice and something a fishing buddy and I have been discussing. A lot of times I find myself wondering if I have the exact right tip on and I'm fishing at the right level when in all actuality you can do a lot with casting angles and the weight of the fly on the same tip.
 

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You can start with a set of tips. I believe you'll find which ones to leave in your wader-pocket and the one that will be easiest to cast right away.
 

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Dom
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3,163 Posts
12.5' t11
10' t11
7.5' sink t11 mow
5' sink t11 mow
10' intermediate tip in 90-110gr range for low and clear conditions

And most importantly....

Intermediate skagit if you going to do any out of the boat fishing.
 

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Hi All,

I am new to spey casting and am putting together my first spey system. Lots to learn for me. Very fun too.

I have a 13 ft 2 handed 7 weight rod and will use a Skagit max 525 grain head. Will mostly be fishing for steelhead in Michigan and an occasional trip to BC. Mostly swinging flies on medium sized rivers in the midwest.

I think the next step is to get medium MOW tips. I know rio sells a MOW package of 6 tips. Wondering if I need to get the package or just a few individual tips or possibly some other sink tip entirely.

What would you experienced spey cast fishers recommend?

thanks for any advice,

Kent
My thoughts here would be to keep things pretty simple, but do give yourself some flexibility. I have yet to use the OPTS tips, so I won’t try and compare them, there are lots of other options for sinking a fly; but for the sake of simplicity I can address MOW/IMOW tips. For winter fishing you could probably do just fine with one full sink MOW tip (my personal preference for a 7wt, and a 525 Skagit Head would be T-11, but T-14 is certainly doable). Depending on the water you’re fishing, a half sink/half float or intermediate is very handy too, and a full intermediate definitely has its place. You really don’t “need” any more than that, and could do ok with just one tip by choosing your water and adjusting your technique a bit, but those three tips would give you a lot of flexibility and keep costs a bit more reasonable.

Whatever you do, don’t fall for the gear trap; wasting large amounts of fishing time fussing with your tips, your leader, your fly selection, changing this, trying that, wondering if maybe the other one was better... etc. Usually once I have a sink tip on I will adjust my technique to fit the water until it gets to the point where I don’t feel I can effectively fish the water with the tip I have on (ie I keep getting hung up, or I’m having to rush the fly through too fast to avoid getting snagged), then I will switch tips...or sometimes I might just move to another piece of water, depending.
Good luck,
JB
 

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All Tangled Up
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677 Posts
I'm sorta with Jason here. Keep it simple.

For a 525gr skagit, I'd advise the medium (T-11) tips. If it were me, keeping it simple, I'd go with one tip 10' length of T-11 (full sinking), one tip 5/5 iMOW (5 ft intermediate, 5 ft T-11), or, 5/5 MOW (50/50 float/sink). You could cover a lot of water with those two tips. You can accomplish the same basic goal -- having a little flexibility to cover different water depths/speeds -- in many different ways, but if you find yourself using six different tips in a day you're probably over-thinking it.
 

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Beulah Burkheimer Meiser
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I'm a big fan of the OPST Commando Tips. You can get the three pack, or buy them individually, but I believe they simplify the choice of tip for a given spot.

Given your rod, I would recommend the 132 grain 12ft ones. They are labeled "riffle", "run", and "bucket"; which are pretty self explanatory.
I love MOW tips but I think the OPST 12 footers are the most versatile tips. I think you are right Coalbe.
 

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Im far from a expert but was able to have some success when I first started swinging flies by just keeping it simple.
I purchased 30' sections of T8 and T11 and cut each 30' section into three tips (8ft, 10ft, 12ft) and just carried those tips in a wallet for the first few seasons. Worked great for me, and cost a little less then purchasing a MOW set.
 

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Read the mass & maintain depth explanations some where before. This time I am writing it down on the the cuff of my favorite fishing shirt and never washing it.
 

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If that’s going to be your only Rob for a while I would suggest getting the fLoading, 5/5 And the 10 feet of T 11.
 

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Im far from a expert but was able to have some success when I first started swinging flies by just keeping it simple.
I purchased 30' sections of T8 and T11 and cut each 30' section into three tips (8ft, 10ft, 12ft) and just carried those tips in a wallet for the first few seasons. Worked great for me, and cost a little less then purchasing a MOW set.
I have constructed my own tips from T-material as well and found it to be a very flexible method. Out of curiosity: what would be the recommended way for a beginner to construct the loops at the ends of the tip?

(Being old school, I have nail-knotted thick monofilament at both ends of the tip, and then tied perfection loops at the ends. But I certainly do not think that this is the recommended method.)
 
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