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Discussion Starter #1
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Just a small sample for a good friend in KS. My way of returning the favor for showing me around an incredible fishery that is just about to go absolute bonkers with the shorter, cooler days.
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Wiper Bass (White bass Striped Bass Hybrid) are the main attraction. This one is a typical 18-24", 4-6 lbs, conservatively.

Schools of Thread-fin shad in the lake support a very healthy population of Wipers and when they go into their feeding frenzies - it can be the most amazing surface action to be had anywhere. The lake is also known for its big hard- fighting Smallmouth Bass which will often follow below the schools of shad and Wiper. There are also Walleye and the lowly Blue Channel Catfish which will take flies as greedily as any of the lake's more popular denizens. A seven weight rod with full floater is best for the Wipers. Hard fighters as they will turn their deep bodies against you and also best for dealing with the near-constant winds. 15-20 miles per hour all day, and that's on the good days. The walleye aren't much of a fight, but tasty. The Catfish grow upwards of 30 pounds at Milford and have a big fan-fare also. The majority caught on flies go to about 8 pounds.

Anyhow - Thank you Sherman, and have a blast for me buddy.
Cheers.
 

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Sweet! Thanks for showing us something (fish and flies) a little different.

CT
 

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Cool flies Vic !!
Never heard of Wiper Bass , they sound like a formidable opponent though .
Nice post my friend :)


Mike
 

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Thank you, fellas' - Shifting gears. You know...

Mike - I had never either and formidable they are! Not only at the end of your line - they also have their own way of getting back at you. The safest way of handling these guys is by the belly and with your fingers collapsing the spiny-dorsal fins. So you have them in your hand (like the footballs they are) and you simply toss them back in head first. They are immobile and fairly safe to handle this way. If you try and handle them another way they will flare their gill plates which are razor sharp with a pair of spikes along the edge, not to forget those spiny dorsals. Let me tell you... they know just how to use them.
 

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nice ties

those bucktails look a lot like a fly that i used to fish in my wake for coho. we would fish them just behind the boat in the salt water, just off vancouver island, and the coho would smash them! kind of like a clouser. :hihi:
 

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those bucktails look a lot like a fly that i used to fish in my wake for coho. we would fish them just behind the boat in the salt water, just off vancouver island, and the coho would smash them! kind of like a clouser. :hihi:
pauliedog - yep those are my take at the Clouser Minnow.

From 12 o'clock clock wise: 3 Muddlers, 2 Deceivers, 3 Stripper Sliders (a muddler variation of sorts,) 3 more Deceiver (gray over white shad, and black over olive off to the side) and finally - 5 Clousers.
 

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pauliedog - yep those are my take at the Clouser Minnow.

From 12 o'clock clock wise: 3 Muddlers, 2 Deceivers, 3 Stripper Sliders (a muddler variation of sorts,) 3 more Deceiver (gray over white shad, and black over olive off to the side) and finally - 5 Clousers.
those decievers are beauties too... i love the red in the throat. some multi species ties there i think, not to mention the wide array of applications . nice work!
 
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