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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yesterday on the Russian River, I decided to try Meise's 7/8 Switch Rod (10.5' long) with the Skagit 450.

I put a floating 15' Rio tip on the Skagit, a 15' Rio Steelhead leader and 2' of Flurocarbon 10# with a size 4 Tube Fly.

I was casting from river right, no wading as the water was gin clear and wading in this part of the river in low gin clear water scatters the fish away from the wader. There was a lot of brush a few feet behind which eliminated any backcast.

At first I used a double Spey cast. After a few tries, it was obvious that I had to really extend the shorter rod up on the beginning lift versus my Sage 6126 used earlier with with same line, tip, leader, tippet and fly, to get an adequate load.

Then, it became easy to cast the head, tip, leader, tippet and fly with no running line up to 3 rod lengths of running line outside the tip. I had to mend the line upstream in the air as the shorter rod didn't do a good mend after the line landed versus the 6126. In fact in a couple of places, it was too easy to cast. I snagged and lost a couple of flies on the opposite shore some where between 65 to 80+ feet. Also, this was the first time the 15' leader worked with any of my Switch rods. Normally a 10' leader and 2' of tippet is all that I could handle.

Last but not least, with a WC or MidSpey and one of my Switch Rods, I maxed out at about 45' to 55' feet.:(

After about 30 minutes, my fishing partner wanted to try it. In less than 10 minutes we had him casting and shooting a rod length of running line. 30 minutes later, he was able to shoot up to 2 rod lengths of line. At first he had to bring in about 1/3 of a rod's length of the Skagit head to get the proper lift and motions. At the end of his run, he was casting and shooting 2-3 rod lengths of running line with the green/yellow area at the tip of the rod. After each cast, he had a great grin on his face. :) At the end of the day, he was very happy. :Eyecrazy:

Summary: Meise's 7/8 Switch Rod and the Skagit 450 is an excellent combination. It is very easy to cast in difficult situations. If you own one of Meise's Switch Rods, find the Skagit that works with it, and you will probably really like it.;)
 

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Switch 7/8 w/ Skagit

Thanks. Your report is very timely and helpful for me because I'm trying to decide between a switch rod or a light spey. My apps are summer steelhead (skating, waking, nymphing with a floating line) and pocket water in the winter. I'd also like to use it as a beach rod for the adult coho, which seem to always appear just beyond my normal max casting range. I'm going back and forth between a switch rod (7/8 or 8/9) or the rumored MKS 6/7 12'6". Regardless, I was thinking of using the Rio skagit line. What reel do you use on the 7/8? If possible, I'd like to get double duty by being able to use the same reel (different spool and line) for an 8wt Sage SP. Also, is your 7/8 the traditional action? Thx...Nak
 

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Cool Gramps...Thanks for posting that.

These are some shooting heads with interchangeable tips that we have found to work very well for our 10'6" switchers utilizing single hand double haul, low hand under hand power spey, or two hands overhead.

Of course these recommendations will vary with the angler, but is a good guide.

Real world distances acheived will be in the 50' to 80' range with under hand power, and 80' to 100' plus with two hands overhead, single hand double haul.

Rio WC with tips using only the main belly and running line looped to the kit tips <> Adapted Rio WC:

S2H10656 <> 6/7/8 WC adapted with 15' floating to type 6 sink
S2H10667 <> 7/8/9 WC adapted with 15' floating to type 8 sink
S2H10678 <> 8/9/10 WC adapted with 15' floating to type 8 sink
S2H10689 <> 9/10/11 WC adapted with 15' floating to type 8 sink
S2H106910 <> 10/11/12 WC adapted with 15' floating to T-14 sink
S2H1061011 <> 11/12/13 WC adapted with 15' floating to T-14 sink

Rio Skagits:

S2H10689 <> 450 with WC 9/10/11 tips ~ 15' floating to type 8 sink
S2H106910 <> 550 with WC 10/11/12 tips ~ 15' floating to T-14 sink
S2H1061011 <> 650 with WC 11/12/13 tips ~ 15' floating to T-14 sink


Over the past two seasons we've really spent a lot of time working with lines for the 10.5' to 11.5' switchers and the light weight speys to 13'.

We have now designed a new series of cold fresh water/salt water floating lines for all of the switchers and lightweight "Trouters"

We call these lines the "River Extra" series, and in essence they are floating short belly spey lines with advanced grain weight forward tapers.

These are made for us to our call-outs in the UK through Beulah USA.

They have incremental belly lengths determined by grains within the tapers.

These vary from 42 to 48 feet, presently with grains from 150 to 550.

They are good all-purpose floating lines for the 10.5' to 11.5' switch family of rods as they can be used as single hand double haul, single hand spey, two hands overhead, or two hand under hand....All with equal efficiency.

....The lower grained River Extras are also ideal for the very light weight grained Trouty Speys from 11.5' to 13' <> Starting at 3/4 wt ~ 150 to 250 grained rods.

These lines have been a long time in the works, and I now have them here in the shop.

We will have these available in the near future to 650 grains.

Drop an E-mail if interested in trying these out, or to pass around.

Meiz
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Reply to Cnaka

cnaka said:
Thanks. Your report is very timely and helpful for me because I'm trying to decide between a switch rod or a light spey. My apps are summer steelhead (skating, waking, nymphing with a floating line) and pocket water in the winter. I'd also like to use it as a beach rod for the adult coho, which seem to always appear just beyond my normal max casting range. I'm going back and forth between a switch rod (7/8 or 8/9) or the rumored MKS 6/7 12'6". Regardless, I was thinking of using the Rio skagit line. What reel do you use on the 7/8? If possible, I'd like to get double duty by being able to use the same reel (different spool and line) for an 8wt Sage SP. Also, is your 7/8 the traditional action? Thx...Nak
I was really pleased with the response of the Switch Rod with the Skagit 450.

Meise's Switch rods and the Skagit lines can be used in a boat, on the shore, wading and in tight quarters. My Sage 5120 and 6126 are sometimes to long for certain brush and overgrown streams. Also, they are not made for casting from a boat, and I have been using Meise's rods from my boat and my son's for over 3 years.

The Rio Outbound 8 weight lines work great with this rod, and you should be able to cast to the Coho and other coastal critters if you have room behind you for an overhand or the so called underhand cast.

I used the Loop 3W reel with the Skagit 450. A lower price alternative reel which has good ratings from the Striper users might be the Redington CD 11/12. The reel sells for $149 and a spare spool for $75. You could put the Skagit 450 line on one spool and an Outbound on the other with the small diameter 30# backing.

What you might consider doing is ordering this reel and a Skagit 450 with the backing.

Then get Bob to send you a 7/8 Switch Rod and the MKS. Then, you could try both of them to see which you like best.

I have used the 7/8 Switch rod for pocket water and fishing indicators with a WC 678 without tips 2 & 1, and it is an awesome rod in tight quarters to medium size rivers. It works well with an 8 wt one handed line for pocket water and indicator casting/fishing. You can lob cast a large indicator, good size weighted fly, and some tungsten beads 40 to 50' up stream, and mend the line down to you and then let it drift downstream for another 40 to 50'. It has landed 5 to 7 pound trout with no problem. If Shad on the American or Russian River were close (before the Skagit and Outbound lines), a 3 to 5# Shad was brought in very quickly. It has landed Stripers from a boat up to 10 pounds.

Buy the reel and the Skagit line and get Bob to send you both rods and try them. Then buy the one that works best for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
More personal observations re Meiser's Switch rods and various lines.

Robert Meiser said:
Cool Gramps...Thanks for posting that.

These are some shooting heads with interchangeable tips that we have found to work very well for our 10'6" switchers utilizing single hand double haul, low hand under hand power spey, or two hands overhead.

Of course these recommendations will vary with the angler, but is a good guide.

Real world distances acheived will be in the 50' to 80' range with under hand power, and 80' to 100' plus with two hands overhead, single hand double haul.

Rio WC with tips using only the main belly and running line looped to the kit tips <> Adapted Rio WC:

S2H10656 <> 6/7/8 WC adapted with 15' floating to type 6 sink
S2H10667 <> 7/8/9 WC adapted with 15' floating to type 8 sink
S2H10678 <> 8/9/10 WC adapted with 15' floating to type 8 sink
S2H10689 <> 9/10/11 WC adapted with 15' floating to type 8 sink
S2H106910 <> 10/11/12 WC adapted with 15' floating to T-14 sink
S2H1061011 <> 11/12/13 WC adapted with 15' floating to T-14 sink

Rio Skagits:

S2H10689 <> 450 with WC 9/10/11 tips ~ 15' floating to type 8 sink
S2H106910 <> 550 with WC 10/11/12 tips ~ 15' floating to T-14 sink
S2H1061011 <> 650 with WC 11/12/13 tips ~ 15' floating to T-14 sink


Over the past two seasons we've really spent a lot of time working with lines for the 10.5' to 11.5' switchers and the light weight speys to 13'.

We have now designed a new series of cold fresh water/salt water floating lines for all of the switchers and lightweight "Trouters"

We call these lines the "River Extra" series, and in essence they are floating short belly spey lines with advanced grain weight forward tapers.

These are made for us to our call-outs in the UK through Beulah USA.

They have incremental belly lengths determined by grains within the tapers.

These vary from 42 to 48 feet, presently with grains from 150 to 550.

They are good all-purpose floating lines for the 10.5' to 11.5' switch family of rods as they can be used as single hand double haul, single hand spey, two hands overhead, or two hand under hand....All with equal efficiency.

....The lower grained River Extras are also ideal for the very light weight grained Trouty Speys from 11.5' to 13' <> Starting at 3/4 wt ~ 150 to 250 grained rods.

These lines have been a long time in the works, and I now have them here in the shop.

We will have these available in the near future to 650 grains.

Drop an E-mail if interested in trying these out, or to pass around.

Meiz
Good News Bob re your own lines and all of the lines that work with your Switch rods.

The performance of your 7/8 Switch Rod with the Rio Outbound 8 weight full sink and a sinking Striper Fly borders on the scary. On my local river, I have GPSed a golden spot for Stripers. With your 9/10 Switch Rod and Rio's 350 Striper line I can cast 65 to 70' with minimal effort. With the OB and your 7/8, I whacked two boats about 25' beyond where I normally hit the water with the 9/10 and Rio 350. The fly goes out with minimal loop size in basically a straight line when casted. I have to drawn about 4-6 feet of the OB head in past the rod tip to be able to roll cast to set up my overhand cast with a lot of underhand pull. We use line buckets with water in them to hold the running line.

The only line that didn't work with your switch rods was Rio's 5/6 WC floater. It never loaded your 5/6 nor Gary's 5120.

My standing joke was try to find a line that didn't work with a switch rod. Having said that I could never in even basically perfect conditions do standard Spey casts really effectively with your switch rods re distance and quality of cast. I could do a lot of things to get my fly to where the fish were in small to medium streams with these lines. For me, standard spey casting with the Switch rods was not productive.

That was what was so pleasing yesterday with the 7/8 Switch Rod, the Skagit 450 and a floating 15' tip and even a 15' leader. My very ugly Double Spey and some equally ugly and very unique Skagit thrashing setups cast 50' to 80' with no problem and very easily.

This means we can cast a Switch Rod with a Skagit line a good distance in tight quarters or from a boat, a drift boat or even from a one person pontoon raft. That will open up a lot fishing this spring and summer.

Santa is bringing a couple of Rio floating OB lines that I was going to try with my spey rods. Now the Switch rods will be first in line to be tried and maybe used with those lines.
 

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I,ve talked to Bob Meiser in regards to his switch rods as I've been thinking of the 7/8 myself.After reading these reviews I'm pretty much convinced.
 

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Cnaka,

At the risk of irritating the "Meiz", may I suggest that when you talk to Bob that you ask about rods that are not on his site. The Meiz has been very busy and his site has not kept up. It scary calling Bob because he always mentions more rods that I want. :hihi:

Rober Meiser's spey rods are beautiful, here is a pic of a rod I received in the late fall. The details, feathers, etc. are well done. Rober Meiser turns his own cork. The cork on this rod is some of the best that I have ever seen. And, oh yeah, this is a pefect rod for the rivers that I fish.

cork:



Rod, sorry for the bad pic, but it was almost dark:



Good luck with your choice between the switch rods or light speys. I am going to take a hard look at the 11'7" light spey.

David
 

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DB

Great pics! I have one of Meiz's MKS 13'6" 8/9 with a Bougle Salmon. Meiz's workmanship is impeccable. At Speybum's, I hear about all types of voodoo going on in Bob's lab and I wonder if he has a team of elves down there working the magic. After fishing with the MKS, I'm definitely under the spell. Thanks for sharing!

Nak
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Meise's switch rods and his 7/8

Cannon said:
I,ve talked to Bob Meiser in regards to his switch rods as I've been thinking of the 7/8 myself. After reading these reviews I'm pretty much convinced.
In my old hands, Bob's Switch rods are the only way to go re casting from a boat, personal pontoon boat, tight casting situations while wading or from shore. I have been a little frustrated by not being able to do a good Spey cast with them re distance in good casting situations.

That changed this Wednesday with the 7/8 Switch Rod and the Skagit 450. I was able to Double Spey cast in bad casting situations and fairly good situations. A couple of times I lost a fly on the other side of the river, and my friend lost one. The shortest distance was about 65' up to 75' with the lost flies.

If you ever fish in meat lines, the 7/8 works great with any 7, 8 or 9 weight floating or sinking one handed line I own and the Teeny 200 and 300 with overhand casting. Just strip the line to the sweet spot, roll cast to set up the overhand/head cast and then cast and shoot. There is basically no strain on your elbows, shoulders and biceps with this cast versus a one handed rod and trying to shoot a head and heavy fly.

Have Bob send you a 7/8 Switch rod to try with one of his new lines and buy or borrow a Skagit 450 to try. Then, go with the best line or both of them.
 

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Grampa Spey:thanx for the info.I talked to Bob via e-mail first about his 11'7" 5/6/7 rod and told him the applications I wanted to use for it and he responded back suggesting the switch rod.I've just started to learn to Spey cast and have taken a couple of lessons(at $50/hr. and just losing my job last week being the fault of my own and a moral conscience,that will be put on hold).The double-hand rod I'm using is a Loomis GL3 12'6" 8/9 and is suppossedly a med.fast blank.I find it to slow for my liking but then again,basically I know nothing when it comes to double-handed rods,though I prefer a fast single-handed rod as I have a short,fast and aggressive casting stroke, the Loomis double-hander seems slow to my natural rythm(sp.) if you like to say.So this is my dilema,I'm looking for a faster double-hander in that 12 foot range mainly for overhead casting from the beach for Pacific Salmon but also to Spey cast in rivers for Steelhead and Salmon(our Steelhead on the east coast of the island are all but decimated and this years Salmon returns were only 20% of the numbers expected back,Coho taking the worst beating).Most of the rivers on the island are small,as you mentioned in one your posts you could throw 50-80 feet with the Spey which is all I would need.For overhead casting sounds like the rod can fire out 100+ feet of the line which at times I do need to reach fish,especially Coho.I can throw 100+ feet with two of my single-handed rods(Loop Blue 11'2" 7wt. and a GLX 11'6" 8/9 with a Airflo 40+ line).With the larger grain window on the switch rods I think I could get a few more feet,which I've needed at times to reach those teasing Coho.By the way,I'd love to get a Striper on the fly.Bob was telling me about the Striper fishing in the southern Oregon rivers and estuaries.The way are Pacific Salmon are declining(one theory is the warmer coastal waters),maybe one day it might be an idea to try and introduce Stripers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Reply to Cannon re Meise's rods

Cannon said:
Grampa Spey:thanx for the info.I talked to Bob via e-mail first about his 11'7" 5/6/7 rod and told him the applications I wanted to use for it and he responded back suggesting the switch rod.I've just started to learn to Spey cast and have taken a couple of lessons(at $50/hr. and just losing my job last week being the fault of my own and a moral conscience,that will be put on hold).The double-hand rod I'm using is a Loomis GL3 12'6" 8/9 and is suppossedly a med.fast blank.I find it to slow for my liking but then again,basically I know nothing when it comes to double-handed rods,though I prefer a fast single-handed rod as I have a short,fast and aggressive casting stroke, the Loomis double-hander seems slow to my natural rythm(sp.) if you like to say.So this is my dilema,I'm looking for a faster double-hander in that 12 foot range mainly for overhead casting from the beach for Pacific Salmon but also to Spey cast in rivers for Steelhead and Salmon(our Steelhead on the east coast of the island are all but decimated and this years Salmon returns were only 20% of the numbers expected back,Coho taking the worst beating).Most of the rivers on the island are small,as you mentioned in one your posts you could throw 50-80 feet with the Spey which is all I would need.For overhead casting sounds like the rod can fire out 100+ feet of the line which at times I do need to reach fish,especially Coho.I can throw 100+ feet with two of my single-handed rods(Loop Blue 11'2" 7wt. and a GLX 11'6" 8/9 with a Airflo 40+ line).With the larger grain window on the switch rods I think I could get a few more feet,which I've needed at times to reach those teasing Coho.By the way,I'd love to get a Striper on the fly.Bob was telling me about the Striper fishing in the southern Oregon rivers and estuaries.The way are Pacific Salmon are declining(one theory is the warmer coastal waters),maybe one day it might be an idea to try and introduce Stripers.
After reading this, you might want to have Bob send you one of his new fast action 8/9 Switch rods ( I haven't used one) as well as his traditional 7/8 Switch Rod to try. Then buy the one you like the best.

Later on when you are employed again, and if you still can't reach out there for the Cohos or go for the really big stripers, you might try a Sage TCR 8123-4 or 9129-4. Both are in the 12' range you like and are awesome rods if your timing and casts are on when using them. I have the 9129-4, and after a couple of hours of casting it, I feel it. With the 9/10 Switch rod, I can cast basically all day with a few short breaks. Also, you can buy about 2 Switch Rods for the price of one of the TCR cannons.
 

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hi everybody i have been reading this thread and see that some are talking about the 11'7 567 of meiz. i have that rod built it from a blank, and it is by far my most verstile rod, i have landed fish from pumpkin seed sunfish to deschutes redsides, smallmouth bass, and my biggest fish to date a 30 pound chinook that was on accident. the rod is wonderfull i use a rio midspey with tip to removed for overhead casting mostly and also have the hardy mach1 line. after using this rod and reading this thread am giving serious thought to switch rod. try the 11'7 for anyone interested in a light spey you will not be upset.
 
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