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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Intruders...just sounds cool. Seems to be a pretty big infatuation with them on this site. I am, and I don't even own a single fly!

Was getting ready to buy a bunch of stuff from irish angler and tie some, but my wife shot it down. She can't understand why I need more materials, so I haven't been fishing them yet.

But I had some questions and comments...

A pretty ancient fly?
Developed to fish the brackish water right on the coast where ocean and river meet and definitely imitate a prawn or shrimp??

Recently while fishing on the local waters, I have seen some massive crayfish. I have also noticed the guides and bait-crowd using similar crustaceans targeting spring chinook.

Does the intruder style-fly repesent, or perhaps successfully fool that massive steelhead brain into thinking this is the real deal? Or does it just illicit aggresion? Don't touch my stuff?

And these suckers are huge! Not sure what size hook you would need to tie something this big! Like mini lobsters...
 

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loco alto!
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I envision the fly as squiddy and I think that was the original inspiration. You can probably tie Intruder-alikes using materials you already have. My version continues to evolve and is far from the original in detail, but keeps a few salient features and catches fish when I want a large profile pattern that breathes.

think squiddy. My version uses long thin saddle hackles for the tentacles, attached fore and aft and supported underneath by various materials so they won't collapse, I use most anything in the middle of the fly for color but not too much bulk (chenille is easy, palmered with saddle hackle if desired). Finish it at the head using schlappen, sparse marabou, or any bushy feather that suggests the "squid body" ahead of the trailing tentacles. Like many flies, when it comes to materials and bulk, I find that less is more.

I tie mine on the largest waddington shank, trailed with size 2 or 4 hooks, but others use cotter pins on the cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
squiddy

Squid, I think that is what I meant to say regarding the costal waters...but the "original" idea is to imitate a squid in an estuary type enivironment?
 

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or large prawns

if you see pictures of some of the large prawns that come straight off the edge of the nw coast, and see the vibrant orange in some of them, and then you ee the huge size of them, you might soon connect the hot orange of some patterns to the large body of the intruder pattern.
 

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here is a snippet of a interesting article I read by Harvey Thommasen that talks about what steelhead eat during thier ocean phase :

"Steelhead are voracious eaters and grow rapidly out in the ocean. Predominant food items found in the steelhead stomachs caught in the ocean include fish (eg Greenling, anchovy, herring, and lantern fish), squid, and amphipods. In a number of studies squid were the most important food source consumed by steelhead in the ocean. Crustaceans like euphausiids, branchyurans, anomurans, and copepods have also been found in steelhead but they appear to be less important than they are in the diet of salmon species. Interestingly, feathers have been found in the stomachs of up to 10% of fish sampled in studies. In contrast feathers are almost never found in the stomachs of ocean caught salmon."

regarding fly selection Harvey has this to say:

"If you believe that steelhead bite a fly because they mistake it for food then it makes sense for the fly fisher to select a fly which mimics a salmon egg, amphipod (shrimp), squid, aquatic insect (eg Pteronarcys californicus), salmon fry, or small lamprey larvae. "


In my own personal opinion I think they are effective because of the territorial and aggressive nature of steelhead, although it probably wouldn't hurt if it looked like a squid .
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I wonder if the "crayfish" that I am seeing are just litter from bait fisherman? I saw one in perfect condition and also some claws and pieces.

This is right at Eagle Creek on the Clackamas.
 

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loco alto!
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crayfish are native to the basin. It is common to find them dead or alive, in whole or bits, on many rivers. The sandshrimp used as bait by gear anglers are saltwater critters and can't survive in the river. Google some images to see the difference, or visit your local bait shop
 
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