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Discussion Starter #1
I just found this book at the local library and am really enjoying it!

However, I am finding that some of the lessons and techniques are in contrast to other speycasting sources; specifically, hand position (RH close to the reel?), stance (however, this was answered by you guys a post or 2 ago), and RH always on top no matter which shoulder is cast over??

I have searched this site and am still wondering why the differences.

I would like to mention that this book as also been very helpful and I have only learned as much from Combs's "Steelhead Fly Fishing" (which lead me into this damn sport in the fist place) :smokin:
 

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JD
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Different strokes for different folks

Mike Maxwell was unique. A pioneer of PNW use of the two handed rod. First to coin the term "Spey rod" as the rest of the world, across the pond, refered to them as Salmon rods.

Enjoy the book. Although some of his methods and ideas may be as out of date as Seal Dri waders, he figured it out by himself. And it worked for him.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Maxwell

Defintely didn't intend any disrespect. Still a neophyte, but was only getting confused as to things like hand placement, and wondering why these techniques could run so contrary to "mainstream" casting styles.
 

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JD
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no disrespect taken.

Just a brief history on Mike Maxwell so you might understand where he was coming from. And why some of his ideas were not always in line with what you see today.
 

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What you see today

varies a great deal. John Hazel (DeschutesAngler.com) fishes short head lines with right hand up. The Scotts, at least the distance casters, fish same foot as top hand forward. Underhand casters use a short, close to the body, compact stroke.

Maxwell, as all casters are to some extent, was unique and used a rather uncommmon mix, but he could cast and fish well. Try some and find out what works best for you, as there are many ways to cast a line with a 2-handed rod.
 

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I own one of his rods and I can tell you, it definately is a unique rod. While he suggests a double taper line, I've fished a CND G.P.S on it, as well as a Rio 550 skagit and both are castable. Ultimately Maxwell seems to have had a very unique casting style and therefore a unique approach to rod building. I've handed the rod to very capable casters only for them to be completely unable to cast it.
 

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Jack Cook
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Mike

I cast and fished a lot with Mike over the years. Even back then I found many of Mike's unbreakable rules to be contrary to my own experience. What I did find was that by watching Mike cast and trying to understand his rules and the reasons for them I have become a much better caster. Like everything there is little worth casting in stone. Mike was a great caster. Few could toss as much line with little or no effort time after time.

Things like 'right foot forward'. If you cast with your right hand up and right foot forward you will be forced to twist the upper body muscles which will cause the weight shift Mike was looking for. He could not articulate it like that but the results were there.

There is much good in Mike's methods. You just have to be a miner to find 'em.
 

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Mike

Argos,

I too fished with Mike a few years before his death. He had extremely rigid rules that produced functionality for his life. His rule of the right hand "up" for all cast was not to be, as Jack said, written in stone. It was however something he knew, if the caster would attempt to become proficient at would lead to a preferred cast. Today I enjoy kack-handed casting and find it equal to or as powerful as the cast created by the front of the hand.

Enjoy the book and know that the verbage in it, is very much the way he spoke in life.

Tom Hill
 
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