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I am confused about the Loop color system. We don't have a Loop dealer in the Chicago-area and the Loop website does not give enough information to really tell the rod series about. Can anyone give a description which clarifies the difference in the rod series? It seems from the posts that there are fans of each of the series.

This is for information only, I have enough rods on my wish list. :hihi:

Thanks,
David Dornblaser
 
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It gets hard to put all this into words, but here's an attempt:

Green Line: Quite fast with flex mostly in the tip. Works well for underhand speycast and overhead casts better than other Loops.

Blue Line: More progressive flex profile, but still fairly fast. Might be the best Loop rod for a combination of different types of speycasts and overhead casting.

Grey Line: This one is particularly hard to pigeonhole. It's flex profile is more progressive than either of the above two, but the graphite used allows for very fast recovery. It's probably the easiest casting speyrod I've ever used. Significant distance can be achieved with fairly mediocre technique (I'm living proof of that!)

Black Line: I believe this one has a flex profile between the Blue and Grey, but the lower modulus graphite makes for a different (slower) recovery. It used to be Loop's "bargain" line but today the price is just slightly lower than the Yellow and Blue.

Yellow Line: Definitely the slowest of the Loops. Its flex profile is similar to the Grey line, but the recovery is much more relaxed. I use my 12'4" 8/9 Yellow Line more than any other Loop (and I have a bunch of them) as it handles the vast majority of Great Lakes steelheading I do. It also is a terrific match for the Miramichi and similar Atlantic salmon rivers.
 

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Loop Yellow series

Hi David...just wanted to back up what Jr Spey had to say. Last year I bought a Loop blue series rod. I am a novice at spey, however seasoned at one handed, and have no problems laying out 70' casts with my one handers. I had a very experienced teacher showing me the spey ropes. I did not really like the blue series too much and found it a fast rod, requiring the utmost in attention and work. I traded the blue in for a 14' yellow in a nine weight. When I was at the shop trading it in the fellow kept trying to talk me into the Sage VPS rod and another..I cannot recall. At any rate I went out the next morning fishing for winter run fish with two experienced casters on a local river...the conditions couldn't have been worse. The wind was blowing sooooo hard it was causing waves to run upriver. Both the other fishers I was with were casting the VPS and the other unknown rod. I had both of them cast my Loop Yellow and both commented on the power of the rod and the way it loaded. The rod does the work for you and helps considerably with the timing. I was laying out 90 foot casts with a 15 foot sink tip looped to the end of a shortened 9/10 midspey first day out. One of the fellows I fished with is now a convert and a Loop pro staff member. The Yellow is a canon and will do anyone proud. If you want to read a good write up on the yellow read Dana Sturns review on the speypages.

http://www.speypages.com/speypages.htm


Everyone I have ever given the rod to and had them throw a line with was very impressed. The Yellow kinda grows on you too, and is great for video taping, as the rod shows up nicely.

You will not be disappointed in the yellow...it will cast a mile without a lot of work, and at the end of the day you still have some energy left to tip a few scotch. I love mine and will not switch from it.....to me it feels like a beautiful cane rod....it is something that has to be experienced to appreciate. And don't let anyone tell you slow progressive action is bad.....a fast fast rod is a lot of work and requires great timing.....I like to feel the rod flex and load ....like dancing with a great partner....it should be a pleasant experience, not a work out.

Hope this helps

Paul
 
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I have a Loop Blackline in 12' 4" and 8/9
It overhead casts a SA T40 competition line, 54' and 625 gns like a rocket, 120 feet no problem. I also have a Loop adaptive sink head for it. Very nice and easy to cast bit of gear. Max
 
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