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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all-
I'm new to the spey game and I have several questions. First, can I get some imput on the Loomis GL3 speys, especially regarding the type of action it has, its suitability for a beginner, and its overall quality compared to other speys? Second, I unfortunately don't live near any salmon/steelhead rivers, and I don't fish one particular river or river system all of the time (though I do go steelhead fishing three to four times a year). For that reason, I need a versatile rod-- i.e. one that would be of use in the Pacific Northwest and the Great Lakes. I've been fly fishing long enough to know that there are precious few jack-of-all trades rods, but I would like my first spey to be as unspecialized as possible (maybe the spey equivalent to a 8'6'' 5 weight trout rod). That said, what would you suggest? I will add that most of my fishing will be done in the late spring-fall. Finally, as a beginner, would you recommend a rod with an overhead action, or a traditional action? I have always fished with my beloved Scott ARC single-handed rods, and most of my fly rods, other than my saltwater gear, are on the medium to medium-fast side of things, but I'm not sure that my single-hander experience translates to the world of long rods.

I'm sorry about the long (longwinded?) post; any help/guidance will be greatly appreciated. Thanks, and Tight Lines!
 

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I use a Loomis 8/9 gl3 as my primary

light tips rod for both summer and low water conitions. Add to that larger/heavier flys. The rod is a 'fast' aka stiff progressive 'european' action rod that will fling either the 8/9 XLT or comparable RIO aclrtr a mile. (First rod; then you may want to consider one of the RIO tri-tip lines).

Personal opinion here only but if you're going to be 'self-taught' a traditonal style lighter blank may be easier to pick up and run with. You will also find the Euro blanks take more out of you during a day's fishing than the lighter (14' and down 6-9wt speys) traditional blanks. Several folks here LOVE their lighter wt Scott speys, and with good reason. (This is where Rick Jorgenson pipes up :>) )

If you have the choice/chance try two or three different 'action' rods side by side. Only keep in mind your preferrence for rod actions will change with your ability level.

You post doesn't mention where you live, but suspect there are board members in your immediate area who would be most willing to let you 'test drive' a rod or two.
fae

"and most of my fly rods, other than my saltwater gear, are on the medium to medium-fast side of things, but I'm not sure that my single-hander experience translates to the world of long rods."

Read right past this part of your post. If you like medium/med-fast rods then the Scott's (and you're comfortable with the brand) may be your ticket. If you're reasonably handy with a single hander you'll be blown away by how fast you get the hang of a spey rod. Timing from one to the other (any cast) is still the good old "one-two-three" timing. Major dif. is that with a one hander 60% of the time the lines behind you and you can't see what's going on. Or if you blow it, you've got just about zero options in 'saving' the cast.
fae
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks; that helps. As for where I live, I'm right in the middle of spey-casting country-- Dallas, Texas :) I do travel fairly regularly to Oregon and to Michigan to visit my steelhead fishing buddies, but I would love it if there were someone else in the Dallas area who could help me out.

JE
 

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Loomis rods

there was quite a bit of discussion about Loomis rods in the past. You can findit in the ISC Archives: the last item off of the main page. You can do a search on "rods" , " Loomis", etc.
I tried a GL3 out some time ago and liked it. However I do like slighlty faster rods, like the T&T and Scott SAS rods. I thought tht it was very similar to the European action 9 wt Sage and the St Croix's. Past comments suggested tht you overweight the rods, ie, use a slightly heavier line.
 

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Best all-round rod.

JE,

I'll go on record, the best all-round speyrod out there is the 14' Loop Yellow, followed closely by the old Sage 9140-3. Both are very similar rods (they should be as the are designed by the same guy). There is just something about the 14' Yellow, it is light yet strong, it handles tips and drylines equally well. It is slow enough to cast long-belly lines yet quick enough to do a great job with mid and short belly lines - it is a special rod.

The 9140-3, is just a tad more powerful, a true 10 wt (the Loop is probably a 9/10). It is a Euro rod but don't be fooled, it is a sweet rod. It can be a real cannon when needed on bigger water, yet when properly lined (with a 10 wt) it works smaller waters very nicely.

As with every "jack of all trades" there are compromises and there are definitely "better" rods for a given situation but as you noted, there are very few that can do it all. This topic of being restricted to one rod only (gasp!) comes up often among my fishing friends and these 2 rods normally emerge at the end of the discussion.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the help. I'll definately take a look at those rods. And you're right; the thought of just one rod is sort of disturbing.

Take care,
JE
 
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