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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm doing a bit of research to set up my big rig - a 9143 Z-Axis that I am building up from a NOS blank for tossing long heads - and want to get some understanding of what to look for in a running line pertaining to diameter vs grains. I know thicker gives you loop stability, but not too thick or you end up with excessive drag in the guides and coiling. There doesn't seem to be a chart or anything obvious to find so I am asking for help. I usually set up little trout rigs and light steelhead stuff, sub-12 foot rods and 350 or less grains. Regular 25 or 30lb mono is great there. Can I ask for some clarity on what to look for to set up my new big stick?


(I did read the OPST Lazar vs Berkeley thread. If anyone wants to offload a bunch of mono, PM me and I will send you a spool to fill.)
 

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Sage, Redington, Hardy, G. Loomis
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140 Posts
For my 9 and 10 weight spey rods, I run 40-50lb lazar line. On my 13'9 9/10 Demon I have 50lb lazar line on it. Works wonders, shoots far, doesn't coil that much, easyish to handle in the cold with bare fingers.
 

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Broken Down Spey Freak
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If the intent with long heads is to go for distance then mono is really the best choice. I use to like coated lines in cold weather but I don't bother anymore. Get some 30-40# pro spec and I think you'll be happy. Big game or Stren Catch fish works well too.
 

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Broken Down Spey Freak
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Using underhand casting styles such as Klaus Frimor or Goran Anderson with long heads is near impossible. You just can keep enough line out of the water to cast efficiently. As far as a long leader, while it does and should provide the anchor it also allows the fly to get lower in the water column without the use of tips or polys. For me, I don't worry too much about turn over. Sure I want the line to straighten out and get the fly fishing but once it hits the water it only takes a second or two for the current to straighten things up. Meanwhile the fly is sinking. This, of course, is with a wet fly. For skating/waking I try to get the best turn over I can so the fly is fishing immediately. Again though, it really doesn't take that long for it to happen.

One other thing I usually don't see mentioned, especially when it comes to long lines, is timing. If you can get the line moving just before you release the runner it can make a difference. Release too early and of course no energy transfer and no cast. Release too late and the head will turn over too soon and you likely short cast. If you can release just after the line starts to roll over out of the water then the process has started and will keep going assuming there's enough energy. It takes some conscious effort but if you can just hold back for that brief moment the running line will be just along for the ride.
 
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