Spey Pages banner
41 - 45 of 45 Posts

· Hacker
Joined
·
725 Posts
This is how I learned to cast with my weak hand on top while avoiding frustration: When we step into the top of a run to fish, we typically start real short, with just the tip/leader out, and work our line out a couple pulls at a time. Make it a habit to always use your weakest casts here, when starting short. Continue using the weak cast, adding line two pulls at a time and fishing the casts out, until you get enough line out that your casting starts to fall apart. At this point, without frustration, simply switch to your stronger cast and keep fishing. Keep doing this at each new run, and at some point your casting with your weak hand will become good enough that you never find the need to switch to your “stronger” cast. Go Cougs.

Thanks Zack!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,124 Posts
Quote: 'It’s called a semi parabolic taper you might have heard about it,'

By way of reply. Yes, I have made one or two parabolic rods myself. An apt description of such rods, by Ron Barch in 'Best of theThe Planing Form'- a compendium of essays by rod-makers:
'The name (parabolic) given to this fly rod seems to confuse some anglers; hence, we shall attempt to describe the action. When under stress of casting or playing a fish, the parabolic forms a parabolic curve, uniformly progressive.'

Malcolm
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,434 Posts
This is how I learned to cast with my weak hand on top while avoiding frustration: When we step into the top of a run to fish, we typically start real short, with just the tip/leader out, and work our line out a couple pulls at a time. Make it a habit to always use your weakest casts here, when starting short. Continue using the weak cast, adding line two pulls at a time and fishing the casts out, until you get enough line out that your casting starts to fall apart. At this point, without frustration, simply switch to your stronger cast and keep fishing. Keep doing this at each new run, and at some point your casting with your weak hand will become good enough that you never find the need to switch to your “stronger” cast. Go Cougs.
I am very right-hand dominant (sometimes I think I have a mental block with my left). But I really wanted to learn left-hand up and did exactly what you suggested here @Attack. While I am not very proficient on the left-hand up casts, I can now cast fishable single speys and sometimes not even thinking about which hand is up. Of course, the moment I start thinking: everything goes "plop".
 
41 - 45 of 45 Posts
Top