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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I am looking for switch rod in 12' length class 5/6, line weight 300gr (Skagit) in medium/fast or fast. Actually I have a similar rod from theanglersroost, but it is too slow. The blank is made of IM6 carbon, I am looking for something faster.

I searched the market a bit, but 12' rod in class 5/6 seems to be niche with few options. 12' rod mostly start in class 7 and rods in class 5/6 are mostly shorter than 11'6.

Do you guys have any ideas or recommendations?

Thanks & kind regards,
Bastian
 

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Hi Bastian,
difficult, if you don’t describe, what you want to use it for. Of course there are Loomis IMXPro in 11‘11 in #3 and up, also NRX 12’ in 5/6. The latter I owned. The IMX Pro offers a stronger tip in general and might be better also for Skagit heads.
But Loomis is nearly completely out of Europe meanwhile and not easy to get to try...
I had a test casting shortly with the Guideline NT8 11‘9 in 7/8 (SH classification). Very impressive around 20-22 Gramm Scandi. It might meet your wishes for a faster rod, but would need a Skagit around 330 grain for my taste.
It’s easy to get for a test casting.
If 300 grain is your limit for Skagit use, try the Airflo NanTec 11‘3 #6 (also SH classification). For distance alone, you won’t miss anything in rod length.

Depending of course what is your fishing application... water, fish...
 

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the loomis rods mentioned are great options. but for 300gr Skagit you are looking at either a 3 or 4wt with most companies. some companies use a single hand rating.
 

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Loomis imx pro 5wt sounds about right. The 6wt would work also. The 6wt throws a 350 Opst Head. The nrx 5/6 would be sweet also. Orvis just put out a 12’ 6wt Clearwater. Also echo has the new compact speys in the 12’ lengths.

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi all,

thanks for your answers so far!

Just a few additional infos on the planned application of the rod: I mainly fish a broad river in central europe. No trout, no salmon but asps and chubs, sometimes perch and pike-perch/walleye. Most times the river flows not very fast, but I want to be able to cover much water in short time with limited space in the back. The river is so wide distance matters as well. That's why I started to use spey casting techniques and double-handed rods.

- The Loomis you propose sound suiting, but it seems difficult to get them in Europe - and there are beyond the price range I had in mind.
- Guideline seems difficult as well
- the Echo compact spey can be bought in europe, but the recommenced grain weight for the lowest class #6 is >390

Bastian
 

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You won't see much longer casts using new #5 rod because line weight has much more effect to performance than the rod. Heavier Scandi taper together with long mono leader will increase fishing range but cause less disturbance because its front taper is lighter and longer. To cast heavier line you need to use stiffer rod so you might loose few more fish but fish which stay hooked feel bigger.

Esa
 

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Gary Anderson of ACR (Anderson Custom Rods) makes an 11'-7" 5 wt. that might meet your needs. I have the 7 wt version which casts a 480 grain short skagit much to my liking as well as a 435 grain Scandi; i'm not sure about the 5 wt. He is well known on this forum and you could contact him.




















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300gr in skagit are a little low for a 5 dh

i use it on my winston microspey11' wt4

if you can try the salmologic skyborn 11 278gr , I have the 11 wt308gr and i am really happy of it but the gr indicated on the rod are more for scandi than skagit

my orvis clearwater 12 wt5 is around 375gr in skagit

or you can try a redington hydrogen trout spey 11,6 wt4 in skagit it works with a 300gr
I have the hydrogen trout spey 11'wt2 and I like it
 

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1. Choose or buy the line(s) you need
- for the size and weight of the flies you want to cast
- for the fishes you are hunting for
- and the distance you need for your water.
A short Skagit is not the best for distance and for the big rivers you are fishing, by the way...
Buy also a Scandi to your Skagit line.
2. Then try as much rods you can get into hands with your own lines.
3. Forget the rods you can’t get into hands easily for a serious try by your own on the water you fish.
4. If you do this, you don’t have to be afraid to make the biggest of all possible mistakes.
5. The rod you buy, whatever it is, will not be your last rod...
 
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