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Discussion Starter #1
OK guys, I need some input on making longer casts. A little background-- I'am somewhat consistent at throwing a fairly tight loop 1-1/2' to 2' with a mid-spey line on an Orvis 14' 9wt rod. The line lays out nicely and the fly turns over (above the water) and there seems to be enough energy to shoot line. I have shot line to 105' on occasion. (1)When should I release the shooting line??? If I release the line a split second after I make the sudden and complete stop of the casting stroke, the lines seems to collaspe at the end. (2) Should I apply more power/snap or maybe less with a better timing of my release. Or maybe the anchor point and amount of anchor should change? I use 14' to 16' leader with @1-2 yards of line for an anchor about a rod and half to the side and just in front of me. My goal is to cast 120' WHY because there is this rock that holds pfish and it @120' shot. I hope that's a good enough reason to help me get a longer cast. Thanks in advance.

Klem
 

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Go to the insructor BB and check out the shooting line post started a couple of months ago. Quite a bit of info on shooting line.
 

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As a follow up comment, not sure what the current seams are like between you and the rock but in general I would think you would be better off with a long belly style line when going for those distances. Trying to maniulate a 70 foot or so head and shooting 50 feet is tougher than playing with a 90 to 100 foot head and shooting alot less line. An option would be a shooting head with running line if major mending is not a priority?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Rick

Thanks for the aheads up on "shooting line" already posted. After reading the posts, I went to the river and tried releasing the shooting line like I do with my double haul. Timing the release seems to be the key. I had one cast that measure 112' and looked good. The other casts we won't mention. The good cast FELT good and the results was a great surprise.

In repley to your P.S., 95%-98% of my spey casting is mid-spey distance with a little shooting. The "Pfish Rock" is only one place where--you know "the grass is greener on the other side". I have noticed that my normal casting is much better and more consistent since I started on the road to longer casting. A great side benfit.

Thanks again,
Klem
 

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Klem re your Orvis 14' 9wt rod

What year and model is your Orvis 14' 9wt rod, and what Mid Spey do you use with it.

I have a cousin, who is interested in this year's model.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Orvis Rod

Grampa Spey
Orvis Silver Label TL (8.5Flex) with Orvis two-hander spey line which has the same belly as the Rio Mid-spey. I cast the rod with the belly about 6" out from the tip for most casting situations. The rod is 3 years old. I have cast the Windcutter with it and the performance was great, but to much stripping for the longer cast. Also tried the XLT, BUT My ability (probably) or the line didn't seems to match. The line collasped and distances 90' out were terrible. I'am happy with it. I worked (past tense) at the Orvis shop here in Salem and got a GOOD deal on the rod and line. Don't see to many Orvis spey rods at the clinics, so Iam in the minority with an Orvis spey rod.

Hope this helps,
Klem
 

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Klem re your Orvis 14' 9wt rod

Thanks for the info.

Is your 3 year old Orvis rod similiar to the current Rod that Orvis carries?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The Trident TLS

Grampa Spey
The rod you are lookin' at is probably the Trident TLS (8.5 flex).
It is built on the Trident series and is a step above the Silver Label series. I've cast the TLS and perfer it over the Silver Label TL BUT did not have the money to upgrade at the time. In my book the TLS is a good choice. If you are in the area (Salem) on a Sunday afternoon (4-5 o'clock), a few of us get together at Wallace Mairne Park's old boat launch and spey/single hand cast. You are welcome to join us. In fact, everyone is welcome.
E-mail at [email protected] for directions to the park. Our gathering is turning out to be very enjoyable. Last week two newbies joined us.

Klem
 

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Klem

Thanks for the feed back re the Orvis Rod.

Thanks for the kind offer re Spay casting. I live in Napa California and would not be able to make it.

Thanks
Dave
 

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a couple of questions and a comment

1. Klem, when you cast the MidSpey for distance, do you hang the entire head out the rod tip?

2. What are you doing to manage your running line when you are shooting for distance?

3. How quickly do you complete your casting cycle (from beginning of the initial lift through to the final delivery)?

4. How clean is your fly line?

These 4 points are critical when it comes to effective distance casting. Probably #3 is the most important overall, as it deals with how well the rod is loaded and then unloaded during the cast. When I am working with people on their distance casting (or trying to improve my own!) I find that most of the time a caster is completing their casting cycle too quickly. Slowing down each step of the casting cycle often generates amazing results. Often in my schools I'll take a long belly line, hang the whole head out the rod tip and execute a painfully slow single spey in order to demonstrate effective and efficient loading of the rod. It would seem that with a long line out you'd need to get things moving and keep them moving quickly, but as long as line tension is maintained and a caster is properly accelerating the rod to a firm stop both during the D loop formation and the delivery cast, you can actually make the initial movements of each part of the cast very slowly. It is the combination of continuous smooth acceleration and the weight of the line that gets a really good load into the rod, and once you release that energy the line really flies.

When you are casting, keep an eye on the rod. You should notice it bent throughout the entire casting cycle except when it has straightened after the release at the end of a casting stroke (D loop formation and delivery cast). If you are doing things well you will notice that the rod is at its maximum bend a split second before you stop it. If the bend is not increasing as you are working through your cast (whether forming the D loop or making the delivery cast) this means that you aren't properly accelerating the rod. Think "slow-to-fast" thoughout the casting cycle and see if this helps to increase your distance.
 

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Good Answer

Slowing down is really hard to do, as is trying to "pull the rod" with the top hand, instead of pushing the rod through the cast.
Works well when I can slow down and pull.
Leroy...................
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The SLOW DOWN

Dana and Leroy,
Great points gentlemen. #1 (Head) 6' beyond seems to work the best. I have tried 2' to minus 2'. #2 (Line management) - Place one coil on my pinky and one on my ring finger. I let the line naturally pull-off with a relaxed hand. #3 (Tempo) O.K.---I shall painnnnfully Sloooow Dooown. Timing and Tempo is one of the keys to single hand casting. I shall apply a "Slower" tempo to the spey cast and see what happens. #4 - I clean the line often so that should not be an issue.

A bunch of us get together each Sunday and spey cast (when we are not fishing). Today I shall attempt the Slow Down. Leroy, come on down and join us. Your company would be greatly appreciated. Stan "the Man" is always there doing his thing. We meet at Wallace Marine Park in Salem @3:30ish.

Thanks gentlemen,
Klem
 
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