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Discussion Starter #1
I'm trying to understand the relative value of each of these types of lines. I'm currently using WC on Sage Euro's or a Winston LT and find that they work just fine. I've never used a Long Belly. The longest line I've used is a Mid Spey. The rod I use are 6-126 G IV, 8-124 G IV, 10-140 (old GFL), and Winston LT 9/10 140-4. Am I missing the boat here? I usually fish the Clearwater and Grande Ronde. Thanks for the input.
 

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Probably an over simplification for an answer ..

but the question is: do you want to spend the extra time (each cast) stripping in line, or not, between each cast. If Im 'dry lining' it, I'll pass on the stripping, shooting tips ... well part of the price you pay to chuck heads. (Exception to this would be the sinking poly leaders which can be worked right off the end of a full floater. )

fae
 

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Thanks for the Thought. I'm normally moving down stream during the stripping process so I guess I never thought of it that way.

Thanks:)
 

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Junkyard Spey
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I'd say, "if it ain't broke don't fix it", but if you want to try and 8/9 or a 9/10 80' line and you get up, down, or over to see me sometime I can arrange a test drive. Take care, MJC
 

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You are definitely not missing the boat. This topic has been discussed (and flamed) a number of times on this board. I think the only conclusion that can be made is that both styles work, both have pros and cons and you should use the system that you are comfortable with. I would suggest that you maybe take up MJC's offer and try a long-belly - you may find it useful - or you may not. Like he said "if it ain't broke don't fix it".
 

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Discussion Starter #6
MJC - Thanks I'll definately(SP?) take you up on your offer. If the gods are with me this weekend. :)
 

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loco alto!
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this has been hashed to death on here, but newcomers to the site can benefit tremendously from our more matured fruits of prior bickering

I'm like a lot of other folks who swing both ways. I prefer a long belly line when fishing full floaters, and a short belly line when fishing fast sinking tips. A long belly line makes it physically and practically difficult for me to lift and cast a heavy sinking tip - I wind up having to strip in line anyway after the course of a day, just to make a decent fishable cast. Conversely, with a full floater, a short belly line requires me to strip when I could simply cast and get on with fishing. For me, using both approaches maximizes my fishing time.
 

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more of the same ...tips for short bellies and floaters long belly..

only thing is and this is not the casehere but long bellies seem to be better for Extreme long distance ( further than 99.9% of us can cast)
and long bellies will make you a better caster if you stick with them..
On the other hand Windcutters are much much much easier to cast and allow for many casting faults.
it's all a matter of what you want... The main reason i switched to long bellies is because I wanted to become a better caster..
 

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A few thoughts

Not to overwhelm you with information, but the best way to find out is to try them both.

Most of us agree on ideals of long belly for full floaters and shorter bellys for sinktip work. Here are a few more.

Consider a short belly line if

* you have brush-covered banks or other obstructions around
you where you'll do most of your casting.

* you typically fish small streams

* you plan to do a lot of stripping (esp fishing for Coho, searun
cutts, etc

* you're not really into the art of casting and just want the
quickest way to get your fly to the fish

* you prefer to fish a shorter lighter rod, and especially if you
plan to use it to fish larger flys and sinktips


Consider a longer belly line if

* you're into the art of casting and are looking forward to
spending some time learning the various techniques.

* have open banks / larger rivers where you plan to do most of
your fishing

* use a longer (at least 14') spey rod

* will use it for mostly floating line work

Bear in mind that none of these are absolutes. I'm sure there will be plenty of readers thinking/replying, "Hell, I use an XLT on my 7136 with deep water express tips all winter. I can cast it 130', even in a headwind!!!" :rolleyes: To those exceptional casters, I tip my hat. These suggestions are what I've gathered from interacting with a lot of average speycasters and what they find works for them.

Additionally, there's tremendous skill in the casting of shorter belly lines. Guys like Goran, Ed Ward, Dec Hogan, and Harry Lemire show that there's a lot to learn to truely cast these lines well. It's just that these lines will also allow the beginning speycaster to cast fishable distances (60'+) quicker and more consistently than the longer belly lines. (IMHO :) )

One point of dispute - Rob mentioned that long bellys are better for Extreme Long Distance. I'd have to respectfully disagree, as I've seen Goran Anderrson cast as far or further than any of the long-belly deitys with his short shooting heads. I don't know the exact conditions they cast under at the "World Speycasting Championships" where Steve, Way, and others compete. Sounds like from a pier on a lake. This may give an advantage to the long-belly casters, as most seem to choose this type of line. Then again, all the grass-based competitions (almost all the recent ones in the PNW) have been won by short-belly casters. On the river, tho, I don't think the long-belly lines have any advantage of the shooting heads when similar length rods and line weights are used.

Good Luck!

Brian
 
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